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Old 09-09-2009, 07:36 AM   #61
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Most newer saws have a safety feature that if you let go of the saw, the chain stops. One of the local small engine service man here - a veteran chain saw user - had climbed a ladder to saw off some low limbs. Some how the ladder wobbled and he cut deeply into his thigh. I think it takes some practice to learn to let go if you get in trouble.
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Old 09-09-2009, 07:49 AM   #62
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Thank you for the cautionary tale, hazelnut. You are absolutely correct; they are tools that demand respect. I am feeling a bit woozy now...
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Old 09-10-2009, 08:25 AM   #63
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When using a chainsaw, you want to have both feet on the ground, and two hands holding the saw. Years ago, I had a summer job with a landscaper who did tree work. One of my jobs was to hold the rope, tied to the chainsaw, and keep it taut while he cut off branches, high up in a tree. So, it took two people to manage a chainsaw in that situation. There were no accidents, no falls, and no blood was shed. When I have to cut a branch off of our maple tree, and there is climbing, or a ladder involved, I use a hand saw. Haven't fallen yet....
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Old 09-10-2009, 10:21 AM   #64
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It really is a good idea to plan ahead on any cutting project. Cutting down a tree can be intimidating. [Don't forget to yell TIMBER!!!] I think the hardest part is getting the saw unstuck when you make the first cut for the notch.

How to Cut Down a Tree: Video Series | eHow Videos
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Old 09-11-2009, 12:32 AM   #65
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"When using a chainsaw, you want to have both feet on the ground" That is the best advice I've read. I'll add to wear hearing protection.
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Old 09-13-2009, 07:04 PM   #66
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When I worked for a landscape maintenance company, we rarely used chain saws. Instead we used folding hand saws. They worked well for branches and shrubs. I can't remember the brand we used. I've had children since then and I've lost some grey matter.
http://http://marketplace.diynetwork.com/Product.aspx?Lid=1298-N607213

My dad would put the chain saw on the ground, put his foot on it and yank a few times. He had lost some mobility in his upper body from having a bull toss him into a gate.
I'm not recommending this but it always worked.

As for men "borrowing" tools... I had a co-work who would hide her good tools in a tool box under her bed to keep her sons from "borrowing" them. LOL

Quietman, I like your rules for lending things. My husband lends things to the neighbor and we always get it back broken. He doesn't ask to borrow the same tool twice because he knows he broke it.
(What he doesn't know is that I've taken them to my folks and gotten them fixed. Ssshhh don't tell or he'll be back for the weed eater.)
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Old 09-14-2009, 04:16 AM   #67
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Chainsaws are one of the most dangerous things that anyone will ever touch...

I try not to think about that when I am using it....
ANYTHING can happen...

You also need to wear ear protection as the decibles of a chainsaw are off the charts....

also....
your saw should have anti-vibration technology...
if not...
wear anti-vibration gloves...

The first years that I sawed...I did so without the anti-vibration gloves or anti-vibration technology in my saw...
my hands are permanently damaged...
the saw gave me Raynaud's Syndrome...
and there is nothing that can be done about that...

BTW...
I was using my Craftsman on a restoration workday on Saturday...
it had not been started for a couple months...
Where it didn't want to start the first time...
once I did get it started...the rest of the day it started on one pull...
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Old 09-14-2009, 07:44 AM   #68
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As a beginning woodworker I was intimidated by power saws: I have a vintage 12 in contractor table saw, and also the cut-off saw and a portable power saw. I signed up for classes in woodworking at a local junior college. At every class instructor stressed: safety, safety safety.

Using any kind of power saw is not something to do when you are mad at your husband or teenager. You need your full concentration and a peaceful unhurried attitude. There are too many woodworkers missing fingers and nearly every chain saw user has an injury story.

Most power saws can produce vibrational damage and damage hearing as well. A splinter in the eye is a common injury.

Nearly all saws have "kick-back". A local carpenter-woodworking artist had a narrow piece of wood fly back puncturing his stomach while he was cutting it. Not an injury that one readily recovers from.

Every tool with a blade needs due respect and a power-operated blade needs super vigilence and respect.
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Old 09-15-2009, 06:45 AM   #69
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Another option for smaller limbs is a Sawzall with a pruning blade - a fairly recent addition, blade-wise. We used this to clear our foundation footprint and it worked well on stuff up to ~6" in diameter.
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:04 AM   #70
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I like the Black & Decker alligator for small jobs.
Alligator Lopper: Electric Lopper from Black and Decker

But the solution to successfully using any power equipment is to be thoroughly familiar with how it operates: practice first. Read the instructions and keep them handy.
If what the saw is doing is a "surprise" then you haven't done your homework. You should know what 'kickback' is so that you know how to react when it happens. You should also know what to do if the saw blade binds. This is not the time to panic - its the time to be prepared and act rationally.
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advice, alligator lopper, chainsaw, chainsaw maintenance, easy2start, electric chainsaw, husquvarna, pruning, safety, sought, stihl

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