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Old 09-09-2009, 07:44 AM   #11
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true, but, oh!, the prices!!
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Old 09-09-2009, 12:29 PM   #12
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I guess they figure if you can afford a boat you can afford to pay premium prices to repair and maintain it.
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Old 02-12-2010, 11:42 AM   #13
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The old house preservation is a really great thing to do on restoring the historic view of the house. Sometimes the wrong thing that they do is they are trying to change the materials like the wood windows, they were changing them into a vinyl.
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Old 02-12-2010, 12:42 PM   #14
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ricaroofers. And the vinyl will not last as long as the wooden one's. I am working on the windows in my 100 year old house. the main problems are that the joints on the thin muntons have given way. Some windows were damaged in hurricanes a few years ago so I need to r eplace a lot of glass. and in some cases the lower sash frames have been eaten away of squirrels/possums.

ricaroofers: Do you have any photos of the traditional phillaphine architecture?
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Old 02-24-2010, 02:36 AM   #15
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I don't relish your work on replacing the muntons and glass in those windows. Just a couple of years back one of the companies I was working for was converting an old school house into a home. Of the original 18 nine over nines that they had they managed to salvage 13 of them. All of the muntons had been repaired or replaced and since I was one of the few on the site that knew how to do glazing I got the job of placing all the glass panels and glazing all 13 of those nine over nines....it felt like it took me forever. Just to do one sash took me 1 hours...
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Old 02-24-2010, 10:21 AM   #16
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Fortunately mine just have 2 panels each. My main problem is that something has been eating away the lower rails of the sashes -- they all need an inset repair. Plus I have some glass blown out by the hurricanes. And Ill never find the original wavy glass to replace it. It is available but quite expensive.
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Old 02-24-2010, 11:51 AM   #17
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If all you need is a few panes, there's always junk/resale shops, salvage operations, etc. that might have odd sashes that might be cannibalized for glass or other parts (I have done it with other things, but not with glass panes).
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Old 02-24-2010, 11:59 AM   #18
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I recently visited a Habitat for Humanity Resale Store in my area. Lots of nice stuff for home renovations at great prices. Might be worth checking one out:
Environmental Initiative: Habitat ReStores -- Habitat for Humanity Int'l
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Old 02-24-2010, 06:12 PM   #19
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My glass panes are 40 x 18 in for each, so there are not a lot of them around. I have found salvaged sash though -- some of which I have to cut down to size, but it saves all the mortise and tenon and inset work to replace the parts that have been eaten.

Thanks for the link to Habitat, Cirsium.

We have a local group based in the Auburn University Architecture department. A program called Rural Studio was started in this area several years ago. They mostly do innovative architecture -- for example using hay bales, and tires, but they also do restoration work.
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Old 02-24-2010, 06:16 PM   #20
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Rural Studio is the legacy of Sambo Mockbee who died very young but was able to mobilize an architectural concept that is still very much alive in this area.

Architectural Record | Features | AIA Gold Medal Winner | Samuel Mockbee
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