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Old 12-17-2008, 07:35 PM   #21
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I gotta Tater fork! WOOHOO, wasn't sure what it was, but it works good! Using it with a rake is the way we harvest our taters.

I grow mine on the ground. And the orange netting was not a good idea. Our weather was so weird, the new growth as getting away from us before we could add more leaves. Back to regular mesh screen to hold the leaves down.

These are pictures of 2008's taters and cuke plant.
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Old 12-17-2008, 09:00 PM   #22
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potato rake, potato hook, potato fork........ mabe we need Latin names for tool taxonomy to clear up the confusion ;-)
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Old 12-17-2008, 09:06 PM   #23
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Doccat, looks like you're well supplied with yellow sorrel, too. My summer visitors are becoming addicted to sorrel tea.

Too bad about the orange mesh. It looks like it ought to have been a brilliant idea. Justtoo much trouble to lift up to add more leaves? How does the regular mesh screen work?
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Old 12-17-2008, 09:23 PM   #24
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We will be going back to that again. Just weight it down with some brick. I'll reuse the orange netting for trellising. It was good for a laugh, as we had plp stop to ask what that was for. Mostly newer plp, the regular neighbors all think we're crazy. LOL
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Old 12-17-2008, 11:18 PM   #25
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Quote:
Latin names for tool taxonomy to clear up the confusion ;-)
Yup, that would work. Either that or some sort of a chart where they're numbered P1, P2, P3, etc. And what's worse is that I buy unidentified tools at estate sales because you never know when you might need something that you can't identify by name and nobody else is buying them so they go cheap. I have about 4 tools out in the shed that I have absolutely no idea what they are let alone how to use them but I knew that someday I might need one of them. Female logic. No need to comment.
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Old 12-18-2008, 12:59 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
Female logic. No need to comment.
Hey, it makes sense to me.

And I have a built-in tool identification system when I get home from the yard sales (hint: I married him), and a backup system who lives with my mother and monopolizes my husband during all family functions.
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Old 06-06-2010, 10:38 AM   #27
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My big ten

1) Plastic antique wheelbarrow
2) generic hand pruner
3) Matic
4) Electric Chainsaw ( I used to use handsaws but the Eeee-Eeee, Eeee-Eeee noises provided too much fun for hubby and his friends. They would sit in lawn chairs pondering the angle of my cut, sharpness of the blade, bet on estimated time of tree-fall, contemplate grades of sharpening stones, inquire periodically when dinner might be served. All while chugging cold soda's. In their tiny defense the house rule's go
No dogs, kids or HUSBANDS in the garden!! My bad! )

5) 12" galvinized steel spikes
6) Loppers
7) metal grass rake
8) Long handled shovel- more leverage
9) 9-mil garbage bags for moving, holding large transplants
10) 50 gal. lock-lid totes for transporting compost home, and around the yard
11) Heavy-duty dolly for lugging things (Landscaping Boulders, bags of concrete, compost totes ect...) it's my salute to laziness!
12) Claw Hammer

will there be either a "gold star" awarded for inventiveness or making other "real" gardener's scream real loud?
(blinking innocently)
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Old 06-06-2010, 10:58 AM   #28
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The Italian farmers knife is one of my favorite hand tools. You can slice in at the base of a bunch of stalky weeds and they are done for. One swipe will turn the weeds into a pile of mulch. You can also use it to girdle trees.

Black and Decker Alligator lopper:

Amazon.com: Black & Decker #LP1000 Alligator Lopper 4.5 amp Electric Chain Saw: Home…



As for power tools, the Black and Decker Alligator is the handiest thing I have for woody invasives. Much less intimidating than an electric chain saw -- but you need that for woodies over 4 in in diameter.

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Old 06-06-2010, 11:13 AM   #29
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Top Ten Gardening Tools for Me

1. GardenGirl Trowel,
This ergonomically designed trowel is more expensive than standard trowels, but worth every penny. No hand, wrist or forearm pain.

Here's a uTube video showing Patty Moreno, the GardenGirl using the line of Radius ergonomically designed garden tools.

YouTube - Patti Moreno, The Garden Girl, Using Radius Tools


2. Plastic Garden Wagon to haul stuff
3. Pruners, gear driven
4. Loppers, gear driven
5. 5 gallon recycled plastic bucket
6. Canvas leaf bag
7. Plastic Cable Ties
8. Shovel
9. Plastic Leaf Rake (wide fan)
10. Steel (single bar) Rake

Bonus Must Have: Duct Tape.
I use the duct tape to repair all the holes in my garden hoses after I drag them back to yard from the woods. The numerous holes are from bear teeth/bites. The black bears are obsessed with stealing my garden hoses. I've tossed diversionary hose chunks from my garden hose graveyard into the woods. They are usually ignored. The black bears prefer the new hoses without any holes in them. Brats.
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Old 06-07-2010, 08:21 AM   #30
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Bad bears.
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