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Old 07-19-2012, 04:23 PM   #21
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Wild burgamot and Joe pier weed draw in the bumbles.
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Old 07-19-2012, 05:39 PM   #22
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Wild burgamot and Joe pier weed draw in the bumbles.
Great! I've got both...only too few of them so far. I have grown some from seeds that will take some time to catch up to their parent plants. So far, two Joe Pye weed seedlings (grown from seed and planted in the ground last year) are getting ready to bloom soon...but they are only about 2 ft. tall! I'm thinking they don't have the moisture they need where they are planted...if they can survive there and stay short, I won't complain. I'll still have a taller stand in a moister location as a backdrop for the pond.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:39 PM   #23
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Finally saw a number of bumblebees today on the Hypericum kalmianum, St. John's Wort. The bees were actually rolling on the flower tops; they love the nectar of that plant. I have three of them; they form into small shrubs that contrast the yellow of the flowers with the green of the leaves. I was worried as the Anise hyssop almost always gets them busy in my yard, but this year it took the St. John' Wort blooming to get them active out there. There were dozens of them, very small worker bumblebees. The shrub has a long blooming time, so I hope they will draw still more bumbles from around the area. Everything seems to be in bloom out there. I noticed the mountain mint was being swarmed with smaller pollinators, and the Agastache was drawing honey bees.
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:02 AM   #24
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I planted two St. John's Worts this year. They do grow in the field also. I have H. frondosum, I don't think kalmianum grows this far south. I can't wait for them to bloom! I'll have to watch for bumblebee activity on the ones in the field. Actually one of my unidentified photos is one of the Hypericums, which one would be a guess.

dap, you are right about anise hyssop not being "native to your state and county" according to BONAP, but it is present in PA and KY. I stretch the rules a little more than you do though! Perhaps you could grow Purple Giant Hyssop, Agastache scrophulariifolia instead as you mentioned. Can you handle 2 to 5 feet tall? That's only a foot taller than the Blue.
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:00 AM   #25
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Congrats on your bumbles, jack.
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:05 AM   #26
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dap, you are right about anise hyssop not being "native to your state and county" according to BONAP, but it is present in PA and KY. I stretch the rules a little more than you do though! Perhaps you could grow Purple Giant Hyssop, Agastache scrophulariifolia instead as you mentioned. Can you handle 2 to 5 feet tall? That's only a foot taller than the Blue.
I think I can handle it.

After looking at a lot of pictures of them, I'm looking forward to the color--something rather lacking in my current mix.

And, I think I've been known to break "the rules" just a tad on occasion. (usually by accident)
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:12 AM   #27
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I think I can handle it.

After looking at a lot of pictures of them, I'm looking forward to the color--something rather lacking in my current mix.

And, I think I've been known to break "the rules" just a tad on occasion. (usually by accident)
You dap! I can't believe it!

I admit being partial to the blues and whites and pinks, I'm trying to plan my terraces that way but oranges and yellows keep sneaking in. I have a few leftover black-eyed susans and a threadleaf coreopsis that tagged along in a pot of prairie phlox.
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:34 AM   #28
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You dap! I can't believe it!
.
~smile~. I must really have some reputation here!

Well, over the past few years, I bought a shrub or two at a native plant sale that ended up being a bit out of my range, so I put them in anyway. Seems I lost the bare-root ones (although, they may show up among the competition in a year or two, who knows. The other is still going strong, but I can't find his mate, so there may be no nuts.

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I admit being partial to the blues and whites and pinks, I'm trying to plan my terraces that way but oranges and yellows keep sneaking in. I have a few leftover black-eyed susans and a threadleaf coreopsis that tagged along in a pot of prairie phlox.
I notice I have mostly whites, pinks, and yellows...and the pinks seem to be limited to wild geranium and pasture rose, so my field is mostly yellow, white, and a splash of orange from the butterflyweed. I really need to get more varieties in there...but my focus has been on trees and shrubs mostly. Come fall I'll have purples, "blues", and whites of the asters to mix with the golden yellows of my goldenrods.

Although I wouldn't want a yellow shirt, car, or wall color, I do like a good yellow flower out in the meadow.
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:30 AM   #29
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Since my prairie bed is mostly yellow, I wanted a completely different color palette for the terraces. I'm swimming in yellow composites right now, not that I'm complaining! The brown-eyed susan however need to be thinned after they finish blooming. A few brave liatris and echinaceas provide a bit of pink and purple against all that yellow.
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:40 PM   #30
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The bumbles supposedly prefer blue flowers and yellow (although in my yard they mostly stick to the blue) so I think I've gone overboard with those 2 colors. I have some Great Blue Lobelia just beginning to flower today. I've heard it's one of their favorites and I can't wait for them to discover it. Planting flowers for bumblebees is almost like buying a birthday gift for someone. I feel so much anticipation before the plant flowers (hoping they'll like it), and so much satisfaction when the bees find the flowers and visit them often!
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