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Old 07-19-2012, 08:17 AM   #11
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I agree that that is an excellent goal, and one that I share. My property is not that large, but with a profusion of blooms spring thru fall I hope to help local bumblebees. At least now in July my yard has many bumblebees throughout the day, always at least 5 in different spots, on monarda, anise hyssop, hypericum, among others. Interestingly, while I saw many honeybees back in June (when I also had an absence of bumbles), now I rarely see honeybees among my flowers.
But, are five bumblebees "many"? Not too many years ago bumblebees were truly numerous in my garden, and I would not have ever attempted to count them all. Now, well, I saw one yesterday - the first in a week...
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:09 AM   #12
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Right now I have tons of bumblebees on monarda, anise hyssop, and cupplant. I don't know which they are, I think there are only a couple of relatively common bumblebees that live this far south where as you guys further north have many more.

Just out this morning I was amazed how many were on the hyssop and cup plant. They are tiny, workers I guess. The photos aren't good, it was early this morning, hot hazy and humid. I suppose the fourth photo should go in the Where's Waldo thread.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:35 AM   #13
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Here's another photo if anyone knows which bumblebee this is, Common?
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:43 AM   #14
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But, are five bumblebees "many"? Not too many years ago bumblebees were truly numerous in my garden, and I would not have ever attempted to count them all. Now, well, I saw one yesterday - the first in a week...
Yes, you have a point... five is not too many. But what is nice is that standing in any one point in the garden, I can spot at least five different bumbles working the flowers. I've always wondered where these bees are nesting, and how far they fly to come to my yard. It would be nice to find out.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:45 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by linrose View Post
Right now I have tons of bumblebees on monarda, anise hyssop, and cupplant. I don't know which they are, I think there are only a couple of relatively common bumblebees that live this far south where as you guys further north have many more.

Just out this morning I was amazed how many were on the hyssop and cup plant. They are tiny, workers I guess. The photos aren't good, it was early this morning, hot hazy and humid. I suppose the fourth photo should go in the Where's Waldo thread.
So many bumblebees you have on your hyssop! Beautiful photo. The way the bees love hyssop, it makes me want to plant lots more... who cares if it's aggressive, if the bees love it!
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:47 AM   #16
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I planted another one this year. I just love it! I think I only captured 7 in that shot but the whole plant probably had a couple dozen at one time. Woohoo!
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Old 07-19-2012, 01:43 PM   #17
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I agree that that is an excellent goal, and one that I share. My property is not that large, but with a profusion of blooms spring thru fall I hope to help local bumblebees.
Sounds great, no matter what size the yard.

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Right now I have tons of bumblebees on monarda, anise hyssop, and cupplant...

The photos aren't good, it was early this morning, hot hazy and humid. I suppose the fourth photo should go in the Where's Waldo thread.
At least someone is getting a lot of bumbles this year.

I love the composition of the first photo with the cupplant...too bad it wasn't just a little more in focus--too many of mine turn out that way too. It makes me want to plant cupplant.

LOL about the Where's Waldo thread.
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Old 07-19-2012, 01:45 PM   #18
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I planted another one this year. I just love it! I think I only captured 7 in that shot but the whole plant probably had a couple dozen at one time. Woohoo!
Another one that has been on my radar...anise hyssop.
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Old 07-19-2012, 03:00 PM   #19
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Bee's right about anise hyssop seeding around. Place it carefully where you don't have to worry about self-sowing. I think it would be a great plant for you dap as you have natural areas to cover and it's a wonderful pollinator magnet.

Yeah, bummer about the focus on the bee on the cupplant. It was way too early for me to be out this morning, I even considered going out in my nightgown but sometimes UPS or the neighbors drop by and I thought better of it! I hadn't even had my morning tea yet! I'm just glad the bumblebees like it here!
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Old 07-19-2012, 03:42 PM   #20
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Bee's right about anise hyssop seeding around. Place it carefully where you don't have to worry about self-sowing. I think it would be a great plant for you dap as you have natural areas to cover and it's a wonderful pollinator magnet.
You have me very intrigued. You are right about me having the space for it...I just hope I won't find it too aggressive for even my taste. I'd like to think it would have competition to keep it in check...and I do want drifts of flowers...so just how large do the patches grow...or is it more of individual seedlings popping up all over?

I did a little research and it looks as though Agastache scrophulariifolia is the one native to my area. My "bible" says that A.foeniculum is native to Western U.S. What I read online had me excited, but I don't think I can expect this one to behave the same way. One thing "scares" me: it is called purple "giant"-hyssop. Sounds like it ranges from 3-6ft...with my luck, it would be 6 (or even 7)!

I'm still going to look into it. Thanks.

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Yeah, bummer about the focus on the bee on the cupplant. It was way too early for me to be out this morning, I even considered going out in my nightgown but sometimes UPS or the neighbors drop by and I thought better of it! I hadn't even had my morning tea yet! I'm just glad the bumblebees like it here!
Funny...you probably were wise, but if you did get spotted in your nightgown by a UPS man, you'd have a story to tell for Lib...but, it can't beat 4B's...um...experience.
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