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Old 10-29-2009, 11:17 PM   #11
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Yaa, good idea to transplant your scurfy pea fast before the roots start establishing or you'd be whacking off roots to move them. You must be totally excited about your scurfy pea. Apios americana is one I started here. I'm really looking forward to them taking off for me. I bought a number of these plants. Maybe 4 or 5 of them last year or the year before. You find some cool links. You growing any of these for yourself?
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Old 10-30-2009, 01:35 PM   #12
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Not growing any of these but would like to try the groundnut/apios americana. I have been looking into how to grow them. Since they are a vine like plant and once established can grow up to ten ft per year they can be grown as a ground cover (in the wild area behind garage).Or maybe let take over a raised vegetable bed for a couple of years keeping cut back for control as the tubers grow. That might be best if a harvest experiment were the priority.

Are you going to try eating them?
There is this site where several options are mentioned for cooking. He calls apios americana, hopniss.

Hopniss: North America's best wild tuber? Also Known as Indian Potato or Groundnut (Apios americana). An article by Sam Thayer.

From The Forager Volume 2, Issue 3. Summer/Fall 2002 Sam Thayer

Quote:
Preparation: After procuring some hopniss, the first step is to wash them. I like to do this while sitting near a lake or stream, with a pair of binoculars handy to check out any birds that visit. I simply use water and a vegetable brush, making sure there is no dirt or sand clinging to the vegetables. You can do this cleaning before or after cutting the individual tubers from their chains. Cut off the nodules and any rotten areas, and discard any soft tubers. The inside of the tubers should be white or slightly off-white.
The most common way that I eat this tuber is served like refried beans as a filling for burritos and tacos. To give them this texture, I simply peel them, boil them, and run them through a meat grinder. (I'm sure that other sorts of food processors, such as blenders, would suffice.) The key with "refried" hopniss is to add a proper dose of taco seasoning and something tart such as lime juice. Such burritos will please most lovers of Mexican food. I often mix the refried hopniss with ground venison, which is likewise delicious.
His book is great. I learned about chokecherry leather from him...
The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants by Sam Thayer

Cooking them seems best as some people get ill eating them raw.

Purdue University has some cultural information I found helpful.

Domestication of Apios americana

Reynolds, B.D., W.J. Blackmon, E. Wickremesinhe, M.H. Wells, and R.J. Constantin. 1990. Domestication of Apios americana. p. 436-442. In: J. Janick and J.E. Simon (eds.), Advances in new crops. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

Quote:
Domestication of Apios americana
Although apios in its native habitat is found growing on water-logged and acidic soils (Reed and Blackmon 1985), observations under field conditions indicate that apios grows best on well-drained soils. A pH less than 5 or as high as 8 may also be detrimental to growth. Adequate moisture is important, but excess moisture encourages longer rhizomes.
Cultural Techniques
Most of the research involving cultural practices has been directed towards developing techniques to screen large numbers of plants. Direct-seeding has presented problems. Seeds may take 10 to 30 days to germinate. Seedlings are small and early seedling growth is not vigorous. Seedling death, presumably from insects or diseases, has plagued this technique for starting apios. The most satisfactory method has been to start plants in peat pellets. After germination, when the shoots begin elongation, the plants are pinched back to the first leaves. This prevents the plants in a flat from twining on each other, allows for better root development prior to planting, and permits plants from slower germinating seed to reach sufficient size to transplant.
Tubers are planted intact. The buds that give rise to the shoots and rhizomes occur at the distal end of the tubers. The potential of dividing tubers into sections prior to planting needs evaluation. Generally the larger the tuber, the more rapid the early growth.
Weed control is the most labor-limiting step affecting the number of plants that may be evaluated. Prior to planting, beds are fumigated under black plastic with methyl bromide. The black plastic is removed before planting. Using black plastic as a mulch has proven unsatisfactory as the tender vines of untrellised plants may be severely damaged from contact with the hot plastic on sunny days
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Old 10-31-2009, 07:05 PM   #13
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I'm not a forager. Everything I grow other than the few veggies and fruits I grow for the local critters. This is good information to have at my finger tips, "The most satisfactory method has been to start plants in peat pellets. After germination, when the shoots begin elongation, the plants are pinched back to the first leaves. This prevents the plants in a flat from twining on each other, allows for better root development prior to planting, and permits plants from slower germinating seed to reach sufficient size to transplant.". I tend to leave plants be once they're established to let them go it on their own. I'll remove non-natives that start crowding them. I better not leave this plant on its own to reproduce. Thanks for pointing that out to me.
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:44 PM   #14
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Apios americana sounds like something that I could find a place for here. I'll put it on my wishlist. Thanks for the post.
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Old 11-02-2009, 12:23 PM   #15
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Equil,I don't think you have to worry about helping the apios americana along by growing seedlings unless you have little moisture in the soil.
These plants will create more plants wherever the vine touches soil and the tubers if left in the ground will create more plants, like sweet potatoes. Cuttings will even root very easily.
Only if you are harvesting the plant for human consumption or creatures are digging all of your tubers and tops before it gets established,should you have to even consider reproducing.

I'm not what you would call a forager either but think many more species of food plants should be used rather than the few agriculture has considered worthy of growing.
Diversity in what we as a species grow and eat ,rather than the few mono-culture crops now being utilized would be better for our health as well as the environment don't you think?

Hey benj1, if you do try it please let us know.
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Old 11-12-2009, 03:33 AM   #16
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I planted it in areas that are more upland and are somewhat dryer. Critters do dig... have you ever read the book the Diggingist Dogm http://www.fiona.co.jp/GMO_FILES/IMA...EST_DOG_S2.jpg? That's what it looks like sometimes.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:06 PM   #17
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I am reviving this thread because I was about to make a post about Pediomelum species, and then I came across this interesting post from a couple of years ago.

I am interested in 2 native species: Pediomelum argophyllum (Silverleaf scurfpea) and Pediomelum esculentum (Prairie Turnip). Gloria, are you still growing either of these? Is anyone else growing either of these plants? I found the Indian Breadroot in Sally Wasowski's Gardening with Prairie Plants, and it looks like a great plant for a garden!

Silverleaf scurfpea: Minnesota DNR
Prairie turnip: Minnesota DNR (Indian Breadroot)
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Old 04-21-2012, 07:40 PM   #18
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I've been looking for some Prairie Turnip for a while so if you run into any.... lemme know if you could. I'd like to buy 6 plants if I could. Preferably a genotype local to northern IL but I'm getting kinda desperate so I'd take a genotype from southern WI.
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Old 04-22-2012, 02:23 PM   #19
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The only place I'm aware of is a native plant nursery near me, in western MN. That's most likely not what you're looking for, but if you're curious anyway, here's the place: Morning Sky Greenery: Native Prairie Plants Nursery.
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Old 04-22-2012, 10:03 PM   #20
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You know I have had that bloody scurfy pea for four years now and it still has not bloomed. Last year added three more. They grow but no blooms. Hoping this is the year.
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apios americana, argophyllum, eats, esculentum, gardening, indian breadroot, native plants wildlife, native species, pediomelum, prairie, prairie plants, prairie turnip, scurfpea, silverleaf, turnip

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