Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Reduce That Ecological Footprint > Sustainability

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-02-2009, 08:26 AM   #1
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default Native Soapberry - free laundry soap.

The native soap berry, Sapindus saponaria
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SASA4 is native to the Southern states. There are two varieties:
var. saponaria, wingleaf soapberry is native to the SE states and Hiwaii.
var. spanaria drummondii, western soap berry is native to the SW States.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=sasad
http://hort.ufl.edu/trees/SAPDRUA.pdf
http://nativeplantproject.tripod.com/western_soapberry.htm

How to use it (three videos on using Chinese [not native to US] soapberry.

http://www.soapberry.org/ {soapberry does not pollute the environment}

How to make soapberry extract (recipe)
http://www.soapberry.org/diy

How to use soap berry:

http://www.soapberry.org/soapberryextract

Caution:
Quote:
Don't swallow it.

Don’t get into your eyes.

Don't let children play with it.
Use up Soapberry Extract within 3 months.

*For Chemistry soap allergy or irritant person. Soapberry may made your whole life comprehensively change. Use Soapberry replaces the chemical cleanser, then the symptom may thoroughly alleviate. Frequently wash the hands with Soapberry for several time every day without worries.
*Beware don’t let Soapberry goes into the eyes to avoid irritating to the eye mucous membrane. In case Soapberry goes into the eyes, wash by clean water, after 1-2 hours irritating should disappeared.

hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2009, 12:15 PM   #2
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

bump.
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2009, 12:17 PM   #3
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Hey, someone was looking for natural soap recipes. Was it TheLorax?
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2009, 12:23 PM   #4
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

OOOOPs - you don't make soap with soap berries, you use them INSTEAD of soap.
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2009, 02:39 PM   #5
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

You put the soap nuts in a little bag and do your laundry with them. Or, you can make an extract and use it as a liquid soap for laundry or bathing.

The trees only grow in the South though. Most commercial soap nuts are imported from Asia. But the Indians and even now in Mexico used soap nuts (saponin) for soap.

I think they are available on Amazon, but if you live in the South you may have some in your back yard.

I tried the nuts from the related China berry tree -- nope -- that doesn't work!
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 12:49 PM   #6
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

I may have to find a source - I see good things about the tree as a landscape plant. And useful too - wow! Soap, medicine and a pretty tree with fragrant flowers. I'm going shopping.

Soapberry is very drought tolerant and very salt tolerant: a great choice for a garden near the coast. Soapberry makes a nice small shade tree for a low maintenance landscape. Soapberry does well in poor, dry or nutrient deficient soils. The foliage is handsome, the flowers are fragrant and attract bees, and the fruits are conversation starters (and useful, too).
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 01:14 PM   #7
Too Wild To Garden
 
Stoloniferous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Default

Please use with caution, and always be wary of information that rambles on about a plant's virtues to such an extent. Some of the red flags on www.soapberry.org - Chinese Soapberry ??? Soapberry Extract Contactus Chinese Support Comment * TestReport FAQ* SOAPBERR that caught my eye:

Quote:
Soapberry are used by Indian and Indonesian jewelers to remove the tarnish from gold, silver, and other precious metals.
If this plant is capable of removing tarnish from metals, then it's some powerful stuff, and shouldn't be assumed to be safe for the human body or for the environment.

Quote:
They are used in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for eczema, psoriasis, and for removing freckles.
Removing freckles?!

Here is some information from the Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center:

Soapberry, Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii

Quote:
The poisonous fruit, containing the alkaloid saponin, has been used as a soap substitute for washing clothes. Necklaces and buttons are made from the round dark brown seeds, and baskets are made from the wood, which splits easily.
Quote:
The fruits are considered to be poisonous to humans although they produce a good lather in water and are used in Mexico as a laundry soap.
Quote:
The root and leaves are sometimes used in herbal remedies but can be toxic and sometimes fatal in high quantities or if misused. Sensitivity to a toxin varies with a personís age, weight, physical condition, and individual susceptibility.
The site also suggests this tree as a native substitute for the invasive Chinaberry tree.
Stoloniferous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 01:20 PM   #8
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

And the native soap berry grows in Louisiana!

Stoloniferious: I am not advocating the use of Asian soapberry. I am advocating the use of native soapberry instead of importing the Asian soap nuts. All soaps are poisonous. Actually, using soap nuts for soap is less toxic to the environment than using laundry detergents.
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 01:25 PM   #9
Too Wild To Garden
 
Stoloniferous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Default

No worries, Hazlenut. I'm sure that soapberries are less toxic to the environment to some extent; I just doubt that they are harmless, and I find sites like that Chinese one to be frighteningly misleading.

If there were a variety that grew up here in the frigid north, it would be high on my wish-list.
Stoloniferous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 02:24 PM   #10
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

Soap Nuts Pro Soap Nuts

There is more information about soap nuts, including their toxicity relative to other green laundry detergents here.

Quote:
Man has used soap nuts since ancient times - primarily in Far East lands. They go by many common names such as soap berries, washing nuts, soap nut shells, wash shells, soapberry nuts, Ritha nut shells, Chinese soapberry and many more. Until recently, they have been obscure and virtually unheard of by most. There are logical explanations for this obscurity - many are sad and tragic, but true. However, what is most important is where we go from here. Integrating the benefits of soap nuts into our daily lives will be one of the greatest accomplishments of our age.
Soap nuts are more appropriately called a soapberry. I will use both terms. There is no difference whatsoever regardless of the term used. To visualize a soapberry, think of a golden colored cherry while still on the tree - they are very similar type fruits in appearance. Being more specific, the soap nut that we use for cleaning purposes is actually the pulp and skin of the dried soapberry. The seed is not used for cleaning. It is for cultivating new trees. Research is being conducted for other uses of the soap nut seed, but no other benefits have yet to be documented. Please note that all soap berries are not alike. This will be discussed in detail.
This pulp and skin contain an extremely important natural substance called saponin. Saponin is a truly natural soap (in effect at least). More precisely, and MOST importantly, it is a 100% natural surfactant
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
berry, clean, clothes, fibers, free, garment, laundry, mukorossi, native, natural surfactants, nuts, sapindus, sapindus mukorossi, saponins, soap, soap nuts, soapberry, soapnuts, wash, washing

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2