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Old 07-14-2009, 10:40 AM   #1
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Default A new way to farm fish and feed the world

A new way to farm fish and feed the world
Scientists at Columbus Center hope to show viability of 'greener' aquaculture
By Timothy B. Wheeler
Baltimore Sun reporter
July 1, 2009

A new way to farm fish and feed the world - baltimoresun.com
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He didn't catch this glistening branzini. He raised it - and thousands more - in large fiberglass tanks at the Columbus Center at the Inner Harbor.
"This is a happy moment here," says Zohar, director of the Center of Marine Biotechnology at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. "Green fish, as good as it gets. Clean, environmentally friendly, sushi-quality fish, delivered to the restaurant a few hours after harvesting."
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"These fish are as clean, green and organic as you can get," say Zohar, who has bred and raised striped bass and blue crabs in the Columbus Center laboratory. He's focusing the center's efforts on fish that he believes have commercial potential, such as branzini, a popular European fish that is farmed extensively in the Mediterranean to protect what remains of the wild stock. But Zohar notes that he's raised daurade, or sea bream, another Mediterranean fish, and recently began working with cobia, a popular sport fish also prized for its flavor. Staff members are preparing to try bluefin tuna in larger tanks.
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:16 PM   #2
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Some decry the sacrifice of vast quantities of less valuable fish to feed the pricier farmed ones.
It takes 2.5 pound of feeder fish to make 1 lbs of farmed fish. Most farmed fish are carnivores. Example: Instead of raising cattle that eat grass, you raise tiger for meat. You have to feed the tiger by going out and catching wild sheep. You eventual fatten the tiger up and eat him.

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a closed-loop fish operation like the UM center's could ease harvest pressure on the world's wild fish stocks without generating the environmental problems that crop up in open-water fish farming.
If they can develop a more sustainable fish food source ie plants and algae it can have a very positive environmental effect.

Until then I'm eating wild caught sustainable fish.
Marine Stewardship Council - home — MSC
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:18 PM   #3
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The symbol on product that are sustainable. Marine Stewardship Council - home — MSC
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Old 07-16-2009, 11:29 PM   #4
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Have you ever read the book 'Cod' by Mark Kurlansky? I think you might want to.
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Old 07-17-2009, 01:18 AM   #5
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I've added the book Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World to the WG library bookshelf. Looks like it has something to say about sustainability and overfishing? The thread is here:

http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...html#post29935

If anyone has read this book and has a free moment, could you please drop into the library and let us know what you thought of it?

Thanks!

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Old 07-17-2009, 10:45 PM   #6
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A free moment! Ha. That took me darn near a half hour to write... you owe me.
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Old 07-17-2009, 11:31 PM   #7
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LOL. Well, if I said "when you have a spare afternoon", no one would ever write anything.

It was an excellent review, BTW. Very detailed and informative-- and including objective criticisms and your thoughts on the subject. Well done.

So, when can you whip up another dozen or so???? <hahahahaha>
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:36 AM   #8
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I'm afraid I'm out of spare afternoons after this week. I'll whip them up when I see threads for them. Seeing the thread prompts me to reply if I've read the book. Like most around here, I read mostly non-fiction. I happened to enjoy 'Cod'. You haven't seen me review a book I don't care for yet. I tend to lose objectivity when I start slicing and dicing a book.
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Old 07-23-2009, 09:25 PM   #9
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I've been toying with the idea of Aquaponics and am going to visit a local engineer who set up a large hydroponic system (and as far as I know, not for what you think, as far as I know he only grows real food, shame on you for thinking that of me, or him) in his basement. This may have some utility, if some sort of vacuum pump (self-sustaining or at least of minimal electrical requirements, like windmill irrigation) system could be figured out.
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Old 07-23-2009, 10:33 PM   #10
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They use infrared aerial photography to catch pot growers. I use metal halides in my basement. I've been known to propagate wetland species in kiddie pools in the basement. I got a knock on the door from two Officer Friendlies... who were both very respectful and friendly... who asked me what I was growing in the basement and if I'd care to show them. Absolutely!!! Nobody ever wants to see what I grow. I was very excited that not one but two people were interested in what I was growing. After about a half hour of talking their ears off about this plant or that plant, I finally asked them if they wanted something to drink or a snack while they were on break. They politely declined and stated they weren't on break. I asked them how they had heard of the types of plants I was growing and what prompted them to come and learn more... they both sort of looked at each other before offering up info on infrared photography and how my house was aglow. I guess growing pot in basements and closets was the way to go BEFORE infrared aerial photography. They thanked me for the "tour" and left. I guess I wasn't "their type". They won't be coming back to this house. No way do they want to get stuck taking another tour of my basement.
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