Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Reduce That Ecological Footprint > Sustainability

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-11-2013, 09:07 AM   #11
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

After all that fussing about the federal taxes and handling-- ol'e lazy me went over to look on Amazon at the lye; sodium hydroxide. It is not too bad!

Someone warned on one of the reviews, not to order too much, or you get flagged as a meth manufacturer. I wonder what would be too much?

If I want to continue soap making (if I ever get my kitchen down stairs finish) I can continue to do this hobby.

Oh, and I am never, ever going to put anything like putting a dried herb in mine again. I don't like exfoliates in my soap--I don't think they can ever be crumbled up enough. That took me a while to finally decide that -.

What is really fun is thinking about stuffing various herbs in a quart jar of alcohol 90 proof - to be used some day in soaps.

In the summer time the wild chamomile grows out in our fields everywhere.

Down in the swampy part of our farm -- the "Touch Me Nots" or maybe it is called "Lady slippers" that is the problem with using common names, but it is fun to imagine stuffing them in a jar of alcohol and knowing someday that will go into some soap.

Does anyone know if Balsam is just a tame version of the long leggy wild ones that grow in wet areas? it is suppose to be real good treatment for poison ivy.

Maybe I will grow some more of those calendula and put those in a quart of alcohol.

I also noticed that Amazon offers potassium hydroxide too. I bought a book to make shampoos a long times ago but never got around to making any because I could not easily get ahold of potassium hydroxide and so now I can.

The internet, and amazon -- it is just so easy! If they don't charge a bunch of shipping. Amazon is not as bad as other companies.

I was going to order five pounds of arrow root flour last night for only 4.00 -- amazon was letting this company advertise on it - but it took me out of amazon when I clicked on it . I was going to order it until I found they were charging 21.00 for shipping.
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 03:45 PM   #12
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidambar View Post
Down in the swampy part of our farm -- the "Touch Me Nots" or maybe it is called "Lady slippers" that is the problem with using common names, but it is fun to imagine stuffing them in a jar of alcohol and knowing someday that will go into some soap.

Does anyone know if Balsam is just a tame version of the long leggy wild ones that grow in wet areas? it is suppose to be real good treatment for poison ivy.
Here is a link to what I know as touch-me-not or jewel weed (Impatiens capensis) :

Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis).

I think that is what you are thinking of. There is also a yellow (I. pallida) species that is native to a large portion of the United States as well.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 03:59 PM   #13
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

The price of the lye is cheap... they don't tack the haz mat fee on until you check out. I think before your order you better ask what it is otherwise.... I found out what the brand is that's still sold that's 100 lye.... its Rooto Drain Opener and it comes in 1 lb containers and I think 5 lb containers. I found out they're selling it not too far from me so I'll go pick up enough to make about 5 batches of soap and call it a day.... it's not like I'm going into the soap making business or anything. I just want to learn how to make it and give my extras to friends is all.
--
Chamomile gave me a run for my $$$ last year. It almost got away from me.... it's not native. Really good thing I'd planted it in a planter because it tried to make a break for my lawn and I caught it pretty quick. That plant's tough to get rid of. I'm sure I'll be hand pulling a few seedlings I missed this year but that's not too bad... coulda been worse. Maybe I should wait on wasting what pops up until a few bloom and save the petals for some sort of a soap? I don't know that I'm into exfoliants but... I like the look of adding something to the soap so it's not that milky white color.
--
I don't know if balsam (Abies balsamea)... a northeast native.... provides relief for poison ivy or not but Tecnu sure does!!!
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 04:45 PM   #14
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Oh, I forgot about that...as far as I've read, tough-me-not doesn't really cure poison ivy. It is an old wives' tale. Unfortunately.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 07:59 PM   #15
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

jewel weed that is right -- now that Dapjwy reminded me. yeah, a lot of them are yellow -- but in this area they are mostly orange.

I have researched this once upon a time guys.
I know what I am talking about here.
And that is:
I don't remember what I found out.
Maybe it had an anti-inflammatory in it??? Sort of kind of rings a bell, but not much else. . Now what is the point of researching it, if I forget?

The wild chamomile around here does not flower. It forms a tiny fuzzy yellowish green like the center of the tame ones but no white petals, but it sure smells great.

I wonder how much it is to ship it then? Equil are you getting at some hard ware supply store or what?
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 09:07 PM   #16
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

Poison ivy remedy?

Photos from Wildman:

Jewelweed
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 09:44 AM   #17
Fox
 
wildwatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northcentral rural Arkansas, usa
pawprint Does this have anything to do...with anything?

Slippery elm (Ulmus Rubra), the inner bark is very slippery when wet, and it is good to eat, and has a preservative property about it. When it is fresh stripped it doesn't have much smell, but after a while it gets kinda fishy smelling, I think that is why it must be properly dried/powdered for storage purpose.

Might make a good additive to soap.

About this 'stick blender'... are the batches for making soap usually large like in a witches cauldron ...that large is normal batch size? I've seen mini boat paddles, I thought were used to make soap with. Anyway, it would take forever to mix a 'cauldron size batch' with a stick blender~~~might I suggest a weedwacker as an outdoor portable 'stick blender' for larger batches.~~~

I think it could work, I recently have been reclaiming some used drywall, after stripping most of the paper & nails out of the crushed mixture of drywall & water, I dip my weedeater into a bucket & blend till fairly smooth.

Weird game huh!

ww
wildwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 12:02 PM   #18
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

http://www.simply-natural.biz/media/pickling-crock_big.jpg

This is a picture of the types of ceraminic crocks that I own.
They number them according to size.

Answer to your question Wildwatcher ---- who thinks we are standing around naked in the forest stirring up batches of lye and fat in cauldrens -- Heee, heee, heeee -- that was too funny, by the way!

No it is smaller than that.
About the size of a 1 gallon bucket.
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 12:57 PM   #19
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

Quote:
I recently have been reclaiming some used drywall, after stripping most of the paper & nails out of the crushed mixture of drywall & water, I dip my weedeater into a bucket & blend till fairly smooth.
Wildwatcher. What are you doing with this, do you plan to put it back on the wall?

I recently had an episode of 100 year old plaster falling from the ceiling. I wonder if it could be reused in a similar fashion???
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 03:06 PM   #20
Fox
 
wildwatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northcentral rural Arkansas, usa
musical notes3 throw another long on the fire

Hi ya hazelnut, that was kind of my 'hope' to reclaim the calcium/clay solution and maybe make my own 'plaster in a bucket'. After I considered the pile of debris laying out in the yard, I thought about it, an wondered if I could easily recycle/produce at home, some useable 'plaster in a bucket'. I think they sell buckets of this stuff at the Home Depot...I think they call it spackling compound or joint compound...but the store bought stuff is more rubbery or elastic than mine (when it dries). This stuff is already paid for.

So far I think I have saved $3.00 by not taking it to the dump.

I'm thinking of adding various amendments, perhaps clay dirt, perhaps wood charcoal dust, maybe sawdust, maybe sand, maybe wood ash. I think the stuff is a good amendment to soil, because the high calcium content...so I may just end up pouring it out on the ground. It might make a more solid driveway surface, although it seems to wash away easily. I'm guessing the gypsum neutralizes acidic dirt.

It is unknown to me what it is good for, I just know if I had to have alot of calcium (for whatever), and I haven't found any natural deposits of it around my place, so it must be good to not just throw it away. I think it will store well, once I get it dry.

I know this, one of these days I'm going to have a Ginseng garden spot, and Calcium is required to grow that stuff.

Hey liquidambar, heck ya that slippery elm bark is good stuff, good clean fun with bubbles too, Ok I must agree, soapmaking in the woods... should not include a weedeater...as compared to the better way you suggest!

ww
wildwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bar, bar soap, class, classes, home, homemade soap, lye, made, make, making, poison ivy, soap, soap making supplies, soapmaking, sopas

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2