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Old 07-03-2012, 01:36 PM   #1
Heron
 
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Default being prepared for any thing....( power outages, etc.

lets talk taking care of your home and family in emergencys shall we ...
will you have water if power goes out?
will you be able to stay warm...
will you be able to cook...
will your meds be ok out side a fridgerator ( insulins etc.
will your food rot in freezers and fridges
will you have food on hand for the animals and your selfs with out depending on cold foods?
what will you heat with?
seriously, a nice garden or yard is awesome, but if you can not eat it, or you do not have a way to eat in the winter or disaster what good will a pretty yard do for you?
Im just making suggestions on how to be self sustaining when things go bad.
I know that many of you came from homes that were self sustaining, some on farms, some who canned and are doing that now... for the rest of us who never saw a cow face to face, has never grown a thing except tomatoes ( and mine are crappy to boot ) thinking ahead is critical when its to late to have the things you should have had on hand.... Lets discuss shall we Im here if you have any questions ok

my back ground.... old, raising grand kids by my self and a teen... live in a most non hospitable climate.... and has a super high will power to live lol.
Never seen a natural disaster in my neck of the woods, except for wild fires, and live a quiet life.....
just call me peachy keen all is well lucky lady....
one who just could not think of such things... one who really cried for those going through it but never experienced it for my self ( disasters) that got me to thinking big time.. what if.... what would I do ???? well my will to live kicked in and I have been working ever since to educate folks on how to survive when disaster hits.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:33 PM   #2
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Doozer, you must have been reading my mind! I started researching on generators today. I know I can't afford the hugely expensive ones that run the whole house, so am thinking about a good quality portable. The only one I know of so far is Generac. Any recommendations about generators from your experience with them?
Everybody else welcome to jump in....I want to at least have a window unit and the refrigerator running! Possibly the tv, if possible, to keep up with the news. (we do have a weather radio.)
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Old 07-04-2012, 12:08 AM   #3
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Im so glad you asked !! I purchased 2 5000 watt generators, one on ebay brand new for 55.00 and one from murdocks, not sure but I think around 250.00 and both are great. I could not afford a big one, but I did not want one either.I figure the small one will do my fridge and my heater if need be, other wise I will be eating all the fridge stuff first to rid it and of the use of power for it, and depend on my little cooler which will take little power. and Im working on my solar panel I bought at a gin show that actually has a cigeerett lighter attachment that will run the little cooler ! I can put insulin in that and know its going to stay cool. this great little pannel cost me 49.00 and I see now its almost twice that price.. here it is here... it does a lot and will save me batteries and charge many things I own. http://www.highballblog.com/2011/10/...nel-review.htm
this will keep your batteries for flash lights charged, and it has a light attachement that I love Light up your night | GOAL ZERO Light-A-Life

what I do is set a goal as to what I want to buy each paycheck, then I get it, then mark it off my list. my goal this next week is a tent and another light....
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Old 07-04-2012, 12:17 AM   #4
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I will go out to the garage tomorrow and see what my generators are called ok. I cna not remember LOL
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Old 07-04-2012, 12:46 AM   #5
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The first, and I believe most important, consideration in selecting an emergency generator is matching the generator's capacity to the electrical load that will be attached to the generator. The generator's capacity will be stated in watts or kilowatts (kilowatts means thousands of watts). For example, 3.5 kilowatts means 3,500 watts.

The generator's capacity must be equal to, or greater than, the electrical load. The load is the sum of the wattage of everything that is attached to it. For example, three 100 watt light bulbs would be a load of 300 watts.

To determine the capacity of the generator that you need you have to add up the total wattage of all the electrical things that you want the generator to operate. When selecting a generator you start by determining the load that you will need. That information will come from each item that you want to have electric power. Light bulbs have the wattage written on them, motors and heaters have labels that state the wattage requirement, etc.

For initial planning purposes, the charts at the bottom of this pdf document will give you some idea of the size of generator you will need.
http://www.nyseg.com/MediaLibrary/2/5/Content%20Management/NYSEG/Usage%20and%20Safety/PDFs%20and%20Docs/nyseg%20EmergGennyseg.pdf
(The pdf also has a lot of good information on other aspects of emergency generators)

For the final planning you will have to look at the labels or manuals of the actual items that you want to connect to the generator.

Just as for wattage, you will have to match the voltage and current requirements of the load to the generator's specifications.

Since an emergency generator for many people is likely to be a gasoline powered generator, it's important to remember that gasoline has a short storage life. You can get the storage life up to about 1 year if you add a product such as sta-bil fuel stabilizer to the gasoline.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:08 AM   #6
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There also are generators as small as 6.5 kw that use propane instead of gasoline..
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:36 AM   #7
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Good topic.

Begin to make arrangements, and have decided that if the power looks like it'll be out for more than a day, I'll be ready to pressure can all the venison in the freezer. Toward that, I'm getting ready to can some chicken in the next weeks, having never pressure canned a thing. Wish me luck.

Did the math earlier this year as New suggested and determined (much to my disappointment) that powering my extant fridge via pretty much anything under a couple thousand dollars (solar panels/batteries) would not be possible for more than a day or three. Logistics also formed part of my particular decision relative to rejecting a gas-powered generator, including placement, fuel storage / longevity / availability, etc.

Contemplated a small propane freezer for the precious frozen venison, but that too is a larger investment than I'm prepared to make now ($1,300). Next year...? The numbers don't quite add up even though I traded $600 worth of stuff for this year's venison, LOL.

Traded some other stuff for an inverter --> marine battery combo that should power/charge the phone/computer for a while.

Stocked up on candles, oil lamp and fuel.

The two-burner propane stove with grill will serve to pressure can and hot sterilize water from the nearby river if it comes to that. I'm researching a biosand filter to better clean out river water impurities, but need something other than the cement-based device I see everywhere. I'm thinking PVC pipe.

A solar/crank/battery-powered radio capable of receiving ham signals (among other frequencies) is in the mail.

Thank goodness I'm not on any medication that requires cool temps. A little solar-powered cooler setup as Doozer describes sounds like something that might be good to have around. Check. On further research, I see that one of those portable 12-V fridges takes 5.8 amps. Won't work for me in the big pinch Further research needed to find one that needs fewer amps.

For refrigeration, I think my personal solution is to give it up and prepare accordingly.

Look forward to hearing others' solutions to powering and water...and learning what you find most important to save / have continue to work.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:52 AM   #8
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Doozerdoo-

Good topic.
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Old 07-04-2012, 11:02 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suunto View Post
There also are generators as small as 6.5 kw that use propane instead of gasoline..
A propane system would be a lot more flexible too. It's easier (and safer) to store large quantities of propane rather than gasoline.

In addition to running a generator the propane can be used for heating, cooking, refrigeration, etc. But, as Soundsgood pointed out, some of these options can be rather expensive. Especially if they are only going to be used during an electrical outage.

It all starts with determining what you really need during a power outage. Once you know that you can begin planning for a system that will meet those needs.

Things like solar panels and battery/inverter combinations are going to be very limited in the electrical power that they can provide. The wattage produced and the wattage needed still have to match up. Matching up voltage and current needs is very important with these kinds of sources for electricity. You also have to understand the difference between DC (direct current) and AC (alternating current) when using these kinds of systems.
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Old 07-04-2012, 03:21 PM   #10
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We had real gasoline shortages in our area for a couple of days, so if we get a generator, it will be propane. (That said, we were very fortunate--only a day without power, a full fridge and freezer that lost nothing, and a gas stove, so were were able to enjoy coffee and cooked food during the outage.)
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