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Old 12-22-2008, 04:14 PM   #1
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Default Chokecherry Jelly Recipes

These are some from Cook.com

CHOKECHERRY JELLY 3 c. juice (from 3 1/2 lbs. of ripe chokecherries)
6 1/2 c. sugar
3 c. water
1 bottle Certo fruit pectin

Preparing Juice: Stem about 3 1/2 pounds of fully ripe cherries. Add 3 cups water and bring to boil then simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Place in jelly bag and squeeze out juice. Measure 3 cups into a very large saucepan. Add sugar, mix well. Place over high heat. Then bring to boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in Certo. Then bring to a full rolling boil and boil vigorously for one minute. Remove from heat and skim off foam with a metal spoon. Pour quickly into glasses. Cover at once with hot paraffin wax.

(This is almost exactly like my Mother's recipe. It's almost impossible to find paraffin wax any more. Just you can use regular jar lids instead. And use a water bath like so
LADLE immediately into prepared jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands tightly. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 10 min. Remove jars and place upright on a towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. (If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and refrigeration is necessary.)
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Old 12-22-2008, 04:19 PM   #2
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Default Jelly Making Advice

I've noticed many of you have little to no experience with canning and jelly making, so I'd like to recommend this site

hhttp://brands.kraftfoods.com/surejell

I key to good safe jelly making is good sanitation! Surejell has excellent step by step directions on how to do this. And remember you can also freeze jellies. Sometimes it's a real sanity saver when you're dealing with a bountiful harvest and want to put by as much produce as possible.
If nothing else, you can freeze most fruits easily. And prepare as jellies/jams etc., later on when you have more time. Nothing better than homemade bread and jelly on a cold winter morning!
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Old 12-22-2008, 05:39 PM   #3
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Hey Lady S, that is such good jelly! Yummy!
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Old 12-23-2008, 08:16 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadySapphire22 View Post
These are some from Cook.com

CHOKECHERRY JELLY 3 c. juice (from 3 1/2 lbs. of ripe chokecherries)
6 1/2 c. sugar
3 c. water
1 bottle Certo fruit pectin

Preparing Juice: Stem about 3 1/2 pounds of fully ripe cherries. Add 3 cups water and bring to boil then simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Place in jelly bag and squeeze out juice. Measure 3 cups into a very large saucepan. Add sugar, mix well. Place over high heat. Then bring to boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in Certo. Then bring to a full rolling boil and boil vigorously for one minute. Remove from heat and skim off foam with a metal spoon. Pour quickly into glasses. Cover at once with hot paraffin wax.

(This is almost exactly like my Mother's recipe. It's almost impossible to find paraffin wax any more. Just you can use regular jar lids instead. And use a water bath like so
LADLE immediately into prepared jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands tightly. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 10 min. Remove jars and place upright on a towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. (If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and refrigeration is necessary.)
Oh, this brings back memories of the chokecherries that were so abundant around our farm in north-central North Dakota! In addition to these, my mother would make jelly from wild plums and grapes ('fox grapes') that grew along the river banks. Here, we have to make do with domestic cultivars (I am trying to establish a grove of native plums on the hillside above our spring); I have yet to find wild grapes in sufficient supply to pick for making jelly, and pin cherries make a poor substitute for chokecherries. Guess I'll have to wait for the nest return visit to ND - the last time we were there, found a winery (Pointe of View) near Minot that made chokecherry wine!
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:17 AM   #5
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Over in Oregon we have the same species of chokecherry, Prunus virginiana. A simple syrup recipee for chokecherries goes like this:
CHOKECHERRY SYRUP

Ingredients :
7 c. chokecherry juice
6 c. sugar

Preparation :
Wash cherries and drain well. Place in 8-10 quart kettle and add
enough water to completely cover the cherries. Boil until tender,
about 15 to 30 minutes. Strain through a cloth jelly bag or fruit
press. Combine sugar and measured juice and bring to a boil. Boil
rapidly for 20 to 25 minutes. Pour into hot sterile jars and seal.
BONUS: You can add liquid pectin to make jelly. Follow
instructions in pectin package.
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Old 12-24-2008, 03:43 AM   #6
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That looks very simple to make, Tribal.
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Old 12-24-2008, 06:33 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TribalPlants View Post
Over in Oregon we have the same species of chokecherry, Prunus virginiana. A simple syrup recipee for chokecherries goes like this:
CHOKECHERRY SYRUP

Ingredients :
7 c. chokecherry juice
6 c. sugar

Preparation :
Wash cherries and drain well. Place in 8-10 quart kettle and add
enough water to completely cover the cherries. Boil until tender,
about 15 to 30 minutes. Strain through a cloth jelly bag or fruit
press. Combine sugar and measured juice and bring to a boil. Boil
rapidly for 20 to 25 minutes. Pour into hot sterile jars and seal.
BONUS: You can add liquid pectin to make jelly. Follow
instructions in pectin package.

Now that brings back yet another long ago (55-60 years) memory - a favorite 'treat' at that time (at least for my grandfather and me) was a thick slab of homemade bread covered by fresh sweet (unpasteurized) cream that then had chokecherry syrup drizzled over it!
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Old 12-24-2008, 10:38 AM   #8
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My virgina mountain ancestry responds positively to the sounds of that!
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Old 12-24-2008, 01:04 PM   #9
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Me too, this is not good. I am looking at seed catalogs trying to figure out where I could fit in a few chokecherry plants......LOL
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Old 12-27-2008, 06:01 PM   #10
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And don't forget to make pie from the leavings in the jelly bag when you're done! I got a food mill for Christmas that's going to make this much easier -- I was handpicking all the stupid seeds before.

I have several gallons of chokecherries in the freezer; I didn't make any jelly this summer, in the heat. Now I can, and good thing I waited for the food mill.

Lady S. -- I can still get parrafin at the grocery store here, but I use lids anyway for safety.

The "pie from leavings" trick works with wild grapes, too (that's where I got the idea, stolen from Euell Gibbons). Our native muskadines have skins too tough to eat, but once you've simmered them enough to collect the juice, the skins have softened, too. Just pulp the jelly bag leavings with a food mill (or seed by hand and whiz in the food processor), then add sugar and flour to make a pie filling.
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