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Old 12-29-2008, 05:39 AM   #11
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Oh, Jenny, that sounds yummy. I have a Victorio Strainer that functions as my food mill. Best money I ever spent, since this is my second one. I wore the first one out. They come with a variety of different size cones that separate seeds, including things like raspberries, so that would be a piece of cake to use.
Hmmm, I'm wondering about our northwest property line that faces the road. They would make a good living fence I'm thinking.
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Old 12-29-2008, 08:23 PM   #12
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Doccat, your strainer sounds great, more flexible than my food mill. I'm pretty sure the mill wouldn't do raspberries; at least, the mesh is bigger than the seeds of the wild blackberries I gather, so I imagine it wouldn't.

Fortunately, blackberry cobbler is supposed to be a little crunchy.
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Old 12-30-2008, 07:53 AM   #13
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We too have a food mill that has holes a bit on the large size - thus my wife's "almost seedless" blackberry jam...
BTW, our blackberries - both wild and cultivated - have been quite unproductive the past few years, apparently because of a mite-borne viral disease deliberately introduced in an attempt to control multiflra rose (yet another introduction gone awry).
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Old 12-30-2008, 09:17 AM   #14
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Well, I was thrilled to discover this newer version has an motor as an additional attachment. I use to have kids to turn the crank, but the motor makes process large amounts of produce a snap. And I do use the "pulp" from certain veggies and fruits to make jellies and relishes.
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Old 12-30-2008, 10:34 AM   #15
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Suunto, I'm sorry to hear that about your blackberries. We haven't seen the problem here, but I bet it migrates. I can't see any virus controlling multiflora only -- don't they know how fast those things mutate? If it's spread to the berry brambles, it could eventually spread to apples, too. Does it at least have an effect on the multiflora?

Bushhogs have a pronounced effect on multiflora...
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Old 12-30-2008, 10:39 AM   #16
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Doccat, I meant to say that the optional motor on your strainer sounds wonderful. I've been trying to reduce my dependence on electric appliances in favor of manual (though you can have my food processor when you pry it out of my cold, dead hands!). But something that works both ways? That's fabulous!

Whever I finally fork out the cash for a grain mill, it's going to be a manual, but one of the ones you can hook a motor to... or a bicycle.
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Old 12-31-2008, 12:19 PM   #17
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The disease (rose rosette disease) does indeed kill off multiflora roses, but it also has unintended consequences (such as on blackberries - our raspberries thankfully appear unaffected - so far...). Also, I have seen no effect on any of the dozen-odd apple cultivars on our property. For more information on rose rosette disease, see http://tinyurl.com/a3pc
Unfortunately, much of the multiflora rose growth on our property is on hillsides too steep to bushhog safely.

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Originally Posted by JennyC View Post
Suunto, I'm sorry to hear that about your blackberries. We haven't seen the problem here, but I bet it migrates. I can't see any virus controlling multiflora only -- don't they know how fast those things mutate? If it's spread to the berry brambles, it could eventually spread to apples, too. Does it at least have an effect on the multiflora?

Bushhogs have a pronounced effect on multiflora...
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