Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Enjoying The Fruits of our Labor > Recipes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-06-2013, 09:14 AM   #1
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
bumblebee How to Make Creamed Honey - Part 1


How to Make Creamed Honey


Everyone is familiar with that sweet liquid honey produced by honeybees and sold in jars or plastic containers at the grocery store. It’s a favorite sweetener for beverages and as a spread on breads, muffins, toast and pancakes. But there is another form of honey that you may not be familiar with - creamed honey. How to Make Creamed Honey - Part 1-creamed_honey_2.jpg

If you are one of those who enjoy eating honey but think that liquid honey is too messy to use, creamed honey is an excellent alternative. Even if you don’t mind the occasional sticky mess with liquid honey, creamed honey has some nice advantages. With creamed honey there is no mess, no fuss and all of that sweet goodness melts in your mouth. Creamed honey is 100 percent honey but it does not drip like liquid honey; it has a smooth consistency and can be spread like butter. And with creamed honey you always have the option of gently heating it to return it to liquid honey.

It’s easy to make your own creamed honey. A jar of creamed honey would be a great addition to those holiday meals, or a unique homemade holiday gift for special friends. Or you could just enjoy that silky smooth sweetness as it melts in your mouth on your favorite bread, or paired with almond butter on a toasted English muffin. Instead of that ordinary peanut butter and jelly sandwich you could have a creamed honey and peanut butter delight. The adventurous can try flavoring some of their creamed honey with cinnamon, raspberry, blueberry, pecan, strawberry, apple, lemon, blackberry, peach, jalapeno, huckleberry or hazelnut flavorings.

Creamed honey is also known as whipped honey, spun honey, granulated honey, churned honey, honey fondant, and (in the UK) set honey. All of these names though, are not quite literally accurate.


What is creamed honey?

Creamed honey is 100 percent honey. It has all the flavor and nutrition of liquid honey, but it spreads like butter at ordinary room temperature. And unlike liquid honey, it doesn’t drip. Creamed honey is a special kind of crystallized honey. Well-made creamed honey possesses a creamy texture because the crystallization process has been precisely controlled. Creamed honey contains a large number of small crystals, which prevent the formation of larger crystals that can occur in unprocessed honey. How to Make Creamed Honey - Part 1-creamed_honey_1.jpg

Honey is creamed by mixing one part finely crystallized honey (creamed honey) with nine parts of liquid honey. The mixture is then placed in cool storage to promote rapid crystallization and produce a small crystal structure that results in a smooth creamy texture - hence creamed honey. The precisely controlled crystallization process may lighten the color of the honey, but it does not affect the taste or nutritional value.

Unfortunately, creamed honey is usually one of the least promoted products in a beekeeper’s product line and it can be hard to find. This situation can be traced, in part, to the fact that most crystallized honey is produced through a natural or uncontrolled process that usually results in large, coarse crystals that are hard, difficult to spread, and not especially palatable.


What is raw honey?

Occasionally you will see a jar or plastic container of liquid honey labeled as “Raw Honey”. It's easy to understand what raw means when you associate it with uncooked vegetables where any form of heating is avoided to ensure all of the natural vitamins and living enzymes and other nutritional elements are preserved. Raw honey is becoming more popular as people seek out healthier diets by moving away from highly processed foods. Raw honey is the original sweet liquid that honeybees produce from the concentrated nectar of flowers. Collected straight from the extractor; it is unheated (or only slightly heated), unpasteurized, unprocessed honey.

Usually raw honey can only be purchased directly from a beekeeper or one of their local sales outlets. It looks cloudier because it has only been strained unheated through a coarse filter to remove any large particles of beeswax, pollen, propolis and any other coarse materials; small particles of beeswax and pollen are still in the honey. The small particles of pollen are left in the honey. Raw honey will usually granulate and crystallize to a thick consistency after a few months. It is often preferred as a spread on bread and waffles, or dissolved in hot coffee or tea. Crystalized raw honey can be gently heated to return it to a liquid state. However, since most consumers are naturally attracted to buying and eating crystal clear honey, raw honey which looks cloudy, is often not commercially available on supermarket shelves.

Almost all of the honey found in the supermarket has been heated to a high temperature for pasteurization (heated to 150 degrees or more) and for easy straining through very fine filters. It looks cleaner and smoother, more appealing on the store shelf, and is easier to handle and package. Pasteurization kills any yeast cells in the honey and prevents fermentation. Heating also slows down the speed of crystallization in liquid honey.

On the downside, when honey is subjected to high heat its delicate aromas, yeast and enzymes may be partially destroyed. Among manufacturers there exists no uniform code of using the term "raw honey". There are no strict legal requirements for claiming and labeling honey as "raw honey". Thus, you may also find honey labeled as raw honey that is unprocessed but has been slightly warmed for a short period of time to retard granulation and allow light straining and packing into containers for sale.
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 09:15 AM   #2
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
bumblebee How to Make Creamed Honey - Part 2


Two easy step by step guides for making your own creamed honey.


In order to make your own creamed honey you will first have to buy one jar of high quality creamed honey to use as a starter for your first batch. After your first batch you will be able to use some of your own creamed honey to make more. Finding a jar of high quality creamed honey might not be easy. Depending on your area, you may not be able to find an unflavored creamed honey at your grocery store. You may have to find a local beekeeper that makes creamed honey or order it online.

How do you know when you have high quality creamed honey? Place a small quantity (about the size of a small marble) on your tongue and gently push it up against the roof of your mouth. As it melts and the sweet flavor spreads throughout your mouth pay attention to any feeling of grittiness on your tongue. High quality creamed honey will feel smooth throughout the melting process. Don’t be too concerned with the taste of the creamed honey that you buy. The flavor of your homemade creamed honey will be determined by the liquid honey (9 parts) that you use.


RAW HONEY METHOD

1. Gently bring the raw liquid honey and the creamed honey to a temperature between 60 and 75 degrees.

2. Put 2-1/4 cups of the raw liquid honey in a bowl. (9 parts)

3. Add 1/4 cup of the creamed honey to the bowl. (1 part)

4. Mix the raw liquid honey and the creamed honey thoroughly, but not so vigorously that you incorporate air into the mixture. Pay close attention to the sides and bottom of the bowl so that all of the liquid honey is mixed with the creamed honey. Gently mixing with a wire whip works well.

5. Pour the mixture into containers and cover. The cover should form an airtight seal. Jam type jars or cup sized canning jars with solid lids work well.

6. Put the filled containers in a place where they will remain close to 57 degrees.

7. The filled containers should be entirely creamed honey in a week or two.

This method has a small chance that the final product will ferment if the moisture content is high, and there might be a little bit of graininess caused by some large crystals in the raw liquid honey. It will have all the nutritional value and the same flavor as the raw honey. Raw liquid honey and raw creamed honey should be stored at a temperature below 70 degrees, preferably about 50 degrees, in order to preserve all of its nutritional value for the longest time.


HEATED AND PASTURIZED HONEY METHOD

1. Gently heat 2-1/4 cups (9 parts) of your favorite liquid honey in a pan up to 150 degrees and keep it there for 15 minutes (or up to 145 degrees and keep it there for 30 minutes). Stir frequently so that it heats evenly and there are no hot spots. Heating the pan of honey in a pot of water will provide a gentle heat and help avoid hot spots. (Note: if you start this method with raw honey and you want to remove the small quantities of beeswax, propolis, bee parts, etc., remove the honey from the pan when it reaches 120 degrees and strain it through a fine filter. Then return the honey to the pan and continue the heating process to 150 degrees and holding it there for 15 minutes.)

2. After the heating time is done, rapidly cool the liquid honey down to between 60 and 75 degrees. Place the pan in an ice bath; stir frequently until the desired temperature is achieved. Small quantities could be done by placing the pan in the freezer with periodic stirring until the temperature is between 60 and 75 degrees.

3. Gently bring 1/4 cup (1 part) creamed honey to a temperature between 60 and 75 degrees.

4. Put the cooled liquid honey and the creamed honey in a bowl.

5. Mix the liquid honey and the creamed honey thoroughly, but not so vigorously that you incorporate air into the mixture. Pay close attention to the sides and bottom of the bowl so that all of the liquid honey is mixed with the creamed honey. Gently mixing with a wire whip works well.

6. Pour the mixture into containers and cover. The cover should form an airtight seal. Jam type jars or cup sized canning jars with solid lids work well.

7. Put the filled containers in a place where they will remain close to 57 degrees.

8. The filled containers should be entirely creamed honey in a week or two.

In this method the honey has been pasturized so it won’t ferment. There won’t be any graininess in the final product that could have been caused by large crystals in the liquid honey. A little nutritional value may be lost and there might be a slight change in flavor due to the heating process.


Both methods can only be as good in quality (no grittiness) as the creamed honey used to start the controlled crystallization process. Good quality creamed honey will be very smooth, easily spreadable, and not grainy. Your homemade creamed honey will have all the flavor and nutritional value of liquid honey, but it will spread like butter at ordinary room temperature. Creamed honey is already crystallized so it will not become hard and form large crystals as regular liquid honey will with the passage of time. If creamed honey is heated it will return to the liquid state.
How to Make Creamed Honey - Part 1-homemade_creamed_honey_2.jpg


A few resources:

Creamed honey theory:
master beekeeper

A raw creamed honey source:
Honey and Personal Products - Hansen Honey Farm - Best Honey in the Northwoods of Rhinelander, WI

Creamed honey source locator:
Honey Locator | National Honey Board

What is raw honey:
What is Raw Honey?

Creamed honey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Honey crystallization:
http://www.honey.com/images/downloads/crystallization.pdf

Extracts & flavoring:
Learn about LorAnn's candy oils, flavoring oils, bakery emulsions, and vanilla extracts. | Lorann Oils
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 05:44 PM   #3
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

It looks and sounds delicious. I think I've seen something similar with maple syrup.

Yum. Whaddaya say, MrILoveTheAnts?
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 01:46 AM   #4
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Default

A new list of local honey sources:
Local Honey Source - Find local sources of honey
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
creamed, creamed honey, crystalized honey, granulated honey, honey, honey bees, honeybees, make, part, raw honey, spun honey, whipped honey

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2