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Old 01-17-2013, 09:56 PM   #1
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Default Persimmon Tea DIY

I’ve got a few persimmon trees…. specifically Diospyros virginiana which is native to the lower 2/3rds of my state. I found this article on how to make tea from the leaves and tried it, persimmonpudding.com Persimmon Leaf Tea. Supposedly.... drinking the tea helps relieve allergy symptoms. I haven’t noticed any “relief”. I still like the tea because it is a decent source of vitamin C and….. it’s free because I’ve got the trees right here. A tsp of crushed leaves is plenty to make a cup of tea. The taste is hard to describe. It wasn’t bad but…. it wasn’t anything to write home to mom about either. I found I liked it a lot better when I made 5 C of persimmon tea at once and tossed in 1 bag of ‘Good Earth’ original. I buy a lot of tea and I’ve never seen persimmon tea for sale anywhere but online. This place sells 2 oz for $6 plus what ever shipping is, Order Page: Wild American Teas, Persimmon Leaf, New Jersey Tea, Witch Hazel, Mulberry Wild Crops Farm on line store from the Ozarks. I’m only adding it because they list out benefits of persimmon and mulberry tea.
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I grow Red Mulberry here too, Morus rubra. It’s locally native to me and I did collect a bag of mulberry leaves but forgot where I put em or I would have tried making tea with them.
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Anyone else making their own tea from native species? I’ll be collecting way more persimmon leaves next year. Mostly because I noticed sometime about a year ago the boxes of tea I was buying were the same size but the number of tea bags in the box dropped from 20 to 18 even though the price went up. I probably would’ve caught that sooner or later but who really reads the box when everything looks the same? It wasn’t until I bought 10 boxes on sale and put the new boxes in my cabinets side by side with the other boxes of the same brand that I caught the number of tea bags. This year I’m noticing that the price went up again and that some of the boxes now contain only 16 bags instead of the 20 just 2 years ago.
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Old 01-18-2013, 10:28 PM   #2
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Thank you for this!
One of the lasting effects of Kawasaki disease - and atypical Kawasaki disease --- is long lasting problems with lipid metabolism.

The second link Equil that you gave says it helps in lipid metabolism. So, this has my attention.

Lipid metabolism seems to be a problem in diabetes too.

When I typed in lipid metabolism persimmon and pub med I came up with these studies.
Both said it helps.

Pub med had this study:
Supplementation of Persimmon Leaf Ameliorates Hyperglycemia, Dyslipidemia and Hepatic Fat Accumulation in Type 2 Diabetic Mice
or this
Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidin against Diabetic Oxidative Stress

These studies said that proanthocyanidin found in persimmon leaves controls blood glucose levels, controls the production of triglycerides and other things.

They used Asian type persimmon for their studies though?
Never did say or not say anything about the American persimmon tree.

Considering these studies have zeroed in on faults in lipid metabolism - Japan is well know for Kawasaki disease --maybe that is the reason that the Asian persimmon trees were only studied?

Maybe I am jumping to conclusions.

However: looking at the authors of these two studies - they are Japanese researchers.

I do own two Asian persimmon trees by the way.
They have had a time of it in this colder climate; though they are now getting bigger and healthier every year. I suspect it was cedar rust that attacked them one strange year when the weather conditions were just perfect for cedar rust. It was really bad - something I have never witnessed before and hope to never see again -- I mean like an orange gelatin blob splashed down from outer space, and consumed the cedar trees surrounding our farm. Healthy apple trees suddenly were totally covered with an orange powder. If has not been so bad since, and perhaps the persimmon trees are fairly resistant; unless the Cedar rust is unusually bad - like the plague of the Middle Ages.

Unless the persimmon tea is just real expensive maybe I should buy it?

Equil is your family big tea drinkers?
If so how did you manage that?
Tea- period they barely drink -let alone persimmon -that you said is nothing to write home about?

Perhaps mix it with something else they do like?

By the way Kawasaki disease may be thought to be a Japanese disease. but I know some people very close to me that had blonde/ with a little red hair that had it too.
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Old 01-19-2013, 04:29 AM   #3
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Kawasaki disease.... I know like next to nothing about it.... very little research out there into proanthocyanidins.
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Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae is the pathogen responsible for cedar apple rust but... it wouldn't have affected your cedar trees the way you described. Check this thread out for some AWESOME photos of telial horns on cedars, Cedar-Apple rust?.
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Don't get overly impressed. I'm the tea drinker. My mom was a tea drinker. Most of my friends drink it too. My husband is a coffee drinker like his mom. The kids don't drink coffee but they would drink tea if it was mixed 50/50 with cranberry or apple juice or white grape juice. They don't even care for Arizona Tea which is popular these days.
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Old 01-19-2013, 09:15 PM   #4
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If your child had a fever of 105 following a vaccine - a vaccine reaction --it probably had a form of Kawasakis.
All of the tiny to mid size capillaries are inflamed.

Cedar rust thread that you sent me too - were in the dominant stage . Tiny little galls. Oh that is only one part of the life cycle.

Let me try to find a picture of what happens to those funny looking galls -- one fine, moist, humid, hot, spring day.

Oh never mind - I see you had some links over there to the orange gelatinous mass - sorry!


I wish I took pictures of the cedars that spring! The gelatinous mass that streamed down the cedars were at least a foot long - they even curled like those Christmas ribbons that you take the edge of a pair of scissors too. I was out clearing the fence that day. I have never seen it so bad. It was also a rather unusually hot spring too.

You could also tell that it did affect the cedar trees for once. They looked near death all summer and the next summer we lost a lot of them in high winds - a lot of limbs splitting off, trunks splitting right in two.

But once more I would like to say I am grateful for the heads up on the persimmon tea, and the suggestion I put it in the apple juice and cranberry juice. I will see what I can do. Every thing I do -- I hope will add up to making a difference.
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Old 01-20-2013, 12:16 AM   #5
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Next year pick as many of those tiny little gall thingies you can find on your cedars and burn them or bury them a coupla feet deep. That'll help a little.
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I would LOVE to see photos if conditions are right this spring to produce the foot longs on your cedars!!! Sounds like yours put on a better show than mine do!!! I used to describe what happened to my Hawthorn trees as the Great Pumpkin exploding over the top of them.
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Old 01-20-2013, 01:16 AM   #6
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Equil:
you said, "I would LOVE to see photos if conditions are right this spring to produce the foot longs on your cedars."
Heee,heee, heeee, and the pox on you too!

I am not bragging about having foot long cedar rust - I am complaining!

I hope to never see such a thing again, and probably won't..
I should have taken pictures of just how bad it was, it had to be an historical - once in a life time event (I hope so)

The spores travel as far as 3 miles away if not more.
Cedars are very common and numerous around here - that would be impossible to pick them off to matter, but thanks for the suggestion just the same

It was so bad that year that you could see the rot beginning on not only the Asian persimmons but on the regular American persimmons. I had to cut out as much as I could and then put tar on the wound after soaking fungicide in the wounds.

Fungicide is probably the most dangerous stuff on the planet too So I was not too happy about it.

It is humbling though to know that only by the grace of God, that we really are at the mercy of what ever the weather brings-- just an extra moist and hot spring would give cedar rust such an advantage that it could stress normal species that usually are not bothered by it.

They are slowly getting better though.
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