Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening

Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/wildlife-gardeners.php)
-   Photo of the Month (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/photo-month/)
-   -   July 2015 Photo of the month winners (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/photo-month/12878-july-2015-photo-month-winners.html)

EllenW 08-06-2015 10:20 AM

July 2015 Photo of the month winners
 
2 Attachment(s)
Thank you to everyone who submitted photos. They are all winners but I had to choose two.

First place goes to Wildwatcher's squirrel photo that was so popular with everyone.

Second place goes to katjh for the photo of the Compass plant. I love the big plants too and this photo reminds me of this time of year.

Congratulations!

wildwatcher 08-06-2015 04:12 PM

Wild Arkansas Squirrel Wins Tomato eating contest!
 
Oh boy!!! I'm so glad I've won it is such an honour!:happydance

And I'm happy for katjh for her outstanding winning entry.:bouquet

By the way katjh, if you want your 2nd place prize, that I was offering 15 Apiaceae Osmorihiza Longistylis, [Sweetroot] seed, send me a PM with your name & addy...and I'll send you a letter size envelope with those 15 seed from my garden this year (2015).:wave

Same goes for you havalotta, your entries of the peafowl, & the iridescent blue pollinator, you too shall have your 15 Sweetroot seed if you so desire them, send me a PM with name & addy, and I'll post them right away.:hi

Hey kchd, if your listening in....I'll email you my original pix, for the WG calender, as soon as possible.

wildone

katjh 08-06-2015 09:03 PM

Wow! Thanks, Ellen :)

Congrats to you, Wildwatcher for your 1st place photo! Sorry you had to sacrifice your tomatoes to get the photo though :)

I'd love some seeds! Looks like a good choice for my dappled shade parkway. I'll send you my address.

havalotta 08-15-2015 06:17 PM

Congrats..I'll have to get back to you on the Sweetroot offer there dear wildone.
Again....Sorry to say, there'll be a delay in the delivery of your Winners certificate.

dapjwy 08-15-2015 07:26 PM

Congratulations! :)

havalotta 08-17-2015 10:11 PM

Ok.. What's sweetroot, how big does it get, what type of light and its ground-moisture requirements. Is it medicinal? It sounds like it might be. Teeeeeeeeach me-us!

wildwatcher 08-18-2015 08:15 AM

Sweet root, as far as I know...
 
Hi havalotta, Check out my post #13 on this page, which gives the latin name and a few pixs http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...h-contest.html

As far, as growing conditions, I think some rich dirt, plenty of calcium would be a good start, but whatever is in your ground is probably enough, small gravel & clay doesn't seem to bother it at all, if it is somewhat rich in organic matter and a well settled dirt is good. If you were growing ginseng, you might plant sweetroot in a similar area, allow nearly a square foot of ground for each plant, they don't like being crowded too much. Well drained dirt, but steady moisture because it is a 'root crop', much like a carrot, only the green part gets bigger than a carrot (and is somewhat beautiful, I think), and the root part doesn't get nearly as big as a carrot, and it is sort of whiteish-tan colored. Mature wild plants in my area grow about 3' tall, and about 1' wide, I've never seen one any larger than that. The top dies back every year, but sprouts new growth, early each spring from the root.

This perennial plant loves the shade and loves a good amount of mulch thru the year, but you may have to thin the mulch just a bit in late winter so they can sprout up thru the leaves, especially when growing from seed. Once established in a 'woodland setting' nature will provide enough mulch. The natural ones growing here, live in the bottom of the ravine. If you dig in the area of sweetroot, dig 8" deep so as to keep as much of the root intact, the root also sends off little feeder roots, don't cultivate the dirt around mature plants unless you have a good reason. I've eaten the root fresh, it is kind of peppery/licorice/sweet tasting, and fiberous, but can also be properly dried & stored for later consumption.

I like the interesting reminder I get from the plant, the fragrance of licorice only comes from somewhat mature plants, and only after the plant has bloomed (mid spring) the leaves hardened off a bit in the summer, and exude their fragrance when crushed. (kind like a mint plant smells good when you rip some leaves off of it) I tried drying some mature leaves, and all the fragrance quickly left the dried leaves.

You may have to protect your mature sweetroot plants, if the deer find it, they will surely eat it, I don't mind chewing the fresh purplish stems myself, reminds me of sugarcane. If your careful like the deer sometimes are, the plant will sprout new leaves after they have ate the part of the green top, especially if it is still early in the spring, but I wouldn't take any early stems until your plant is at least 5 yrs. old. Focus growing on the root, and the thing should survive well for many, many years.:hi

Some people note from the internet, they say the seed can be crushed & used to spice up a cake, but the seed I have are really hard seed & sharp pointed, difficult to crush, tis easier for me to replant the seed, than to try to cook with it. Sweetroot is a native plant to N. America. I do not know of medicinal properties of this plant, but I think it does have it's own power that gives me enjoyment!

wildwatcher

katjh 08-18-2015 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wildwatcher (Post 153361)
Hi havalotta, Check out my post #13 on this page, which gives the latin name and a few pixs http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...h-contest.html

As far, as growing conditions, I think some rich dirt, plenty of calcium would be a good start, small gravel & clay doesn't seem to bother it at all, if it is somewhat rich in organic matter and a well settled dirt is good. If you were growing ginseng, you might plant sweetroot in a similar area, allow nearly a square foot of ground for each plant, they don't like being crowded too much. Well drained dirt, but steady moisture because it is a 'root crop', much like a carrot, only the green part gets bigger than a carrot (and is somewhat beautiful, I think), and the root part doesn't get nearly as big as a carrot, and it is sort of whiteish-tan colored. This perennial plant loves the shade and loves a good amount of mulch thru the year, but you may have to thin the mulch just a bit in late winter so they can sprout up thru the leaves, especially when growing from seed. Once established in a 'woodland setting' nature will provide enough mulch. The natural ones growing here, live in the bottom of the ravine. If you dig in the area of sweetroot, dig 8" deep so as to keep as much of the root intact, the root also sends off little feeder roots. I've eaten the root fresh, it is kind of peppery/licorice/sweet tasting, and fiberous, but can also be properly dried & stored for later consumption.

I like the interesting reminder I get from the plant, the fragrance of licorice only comes from somewhat mature plants, and only after the plant has bloomed (mid spring) the leaves hardened off a bit in the summer, and exude their fragrance when crushed. (kind like a mint plant smells good when you rip some leaves off of it)

You may have to protect your mature sweetroot plants, if the deer find it, they will surely eat it, I don't mind chewing the fresh purplish stems myself, reminds me of sugarcane. :hi

Some people note from the internet, says the seed can be crushed & used to spice up a cake, but the seed I have are really hard seed & sharp pointed, difficult to crush, tis easier for me to replant the seed, than to try to cook with it. Sweetroot is a native plant to N. America.

wildwatcher

Thanks for all the info, Wildwatcher! :smileyclap

wildwatcher 08-18-2015 08:49 AM

Hey katjh, did you ever send me a PM with your address info? I have been looking, but I can't send you or havalotta any seed if I don't know where to send it too.

ww

havalotta 08-18-2015 03:40 PM

They look real nice next to your mayapples but now I'm seeing here that they grow into 3 foot plants! Hmmmm so not IN with the mayapples I had received from you but behind them would work yes?

Quote:

root fresh, it is kind of peppery/licorice/sweet tasting, and fiberous, chewing the fresh purplish stems myself, reminds me of sugarcane....
So it is perfectly safe to eat all parts correct? just making sure because I'm open-game at trying new things. Have you ever boiled, fried or pickled the roots or stems? Sure send me a few. Do you still have my address or need it again?


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