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Old 12-17-2012, 09:49 AM   #21
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Well, I would like to say oh Baaaaa not true.
But I have to say yes I have noticed that big trees are dying in the forest. I just assumed they were the short lived trees like locus or wild cherry, or even the walnuts. I bet it is the elms.
There are other trees around them, so I didn't pay too much attention to them, just thinking they are short lived big trees.

But then after reading this, I think that years ago my father told me that locus trees are no longer reaching full maturity because of a fungus. They become huge and then die. Young ones come back easy -enough.

Walnuts have become rather short live trees too -- and Ohio is too close to where I live!!!.
I just had the best time this Fall gathering them. There was a bumper crop this year. Plus, I just planted two that have been bred up to produce big walnuts.

.
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:19 AM   #22
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Good luck with those baby walnuts!
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Old 12-17-2012, 01:49 PM   #23
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Just some things to think about.... Black Walnut isn't native west of the Rockies.... BigHort marketed it as an ornamental.... we bought it and planted it out west to "beautify" our landscapes.
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Geosmithia morbida is the fungus that's wreaking havoc... they suspect its origin is Europe where it's endemic.
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Pityophthorus juglandis is a beetle that's indigenous to the southwest. It spread spores to indigenous species and was kept in environmental check until it jumped hosts.... the rest will be history for our Black Walnuts IMO.... we will be able to contain this introduced pathogen about as well as we were able to contain other introduced pests and pathogens responsible for the loss of American Elms, American Chestnuts, and our American Ash trees.... we won't.
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Here's some interesting PDFs and slide shows that pretty much spell out we're in deep doggie do do.... again, Thousand Cankers Disease - Home, http://www.colostate.edu/Dept/bspm/e...ta%20small.pdf, http://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/TSTAR...pm%20Haack.pdf, Death by a thousand cankers | The Columbus Dispatch
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Thousand Cankers Black Walnut Disease, "What are symptoms of the disease?
A newly recognized fungus, Geosmithia, kills a localized area in the phloem just under the bark in >2cm wood after introduction by the walnut twig beetle. These dead areas often overlap or coalesce from numerous strikes (35 insects per square inch of wood) causing nutrient disruption to foliage and thus leading to branch dieback.

The
cankers rarely show any of the external symptoms that are associated with most canker producing
fungi that affect trees. The affected area is shallow and confined to the phloem of the tree so that it can easily be missed if inspection cuts are made too deeply into the sapwood. Minor weeping may occur at points where walnut twig beetles enter the bark but often no symptoms area associated with the beetle attacks aside from minute entry wounds or star shaped cracks
."
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Internal state quarantines and endless surveys and research into this "disease" and its spread and all the possible silver bullet fungicides won't be able to stop it.... it's a fungus and the vector is a borer. Our $$$ should be put to better use preventing the next introduction but.... seems as if it's business as usual with nobody acknowledging the need to stop the introduction of exotic pests and pathogens at the source for the sake of public health.
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Old 12-21-2012, 10:57 PM   #24
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Unholy alliance!
Fungus/insect.

What is an Arizona Walnut?
Apparently not a black walnut.
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Old 12-23-2012, 10:46 AM   #25
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Unholy alliance is right!!! Arizona Canyon Walnut = Juglans major. Same genus.... completely different species, PLANTS Profile for Juglans major (Arizona walnut) | USDA PLANTS with a distribution that's limited to the southwest and even then to southwestern riparian plant communities, Arizona Walnut. The species doesn't occur "naturally" anywhere east of the continental divide.
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Old 12-24-2012, 10:21 AM   #26
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Thanks for the links. That is interesting reading.
While reading about the Arizona Walnut- it says the other stuff growing around them were aspens, this and that -- and then it mentioned horehound????

I was surprised that horehound grows wild out in the southwest. I wonder if it is native. I always thought that horehound was one of the around the Mediterranean Sea herbs?
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Old 12-27-2012, 01:33 AM   #27
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Horehound is a common name.... common names will trip ya up every time. There's 10 different species of Lycopus....horehound..... documented and all of em are native to NA except 1, PLANTS Profile for Lycopus (waterhorehound) | USDA PLANTS and then there's another genus of horehound with 3 different species, PLANTS Profile for Marrubium (horehound) | USDA PLANTS. I dunno what article you read but look for the scientific name of the horehound. A lot of plants can share the same common name but.... no plant will ever have more than 1 scientific name.
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