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Old 11-09-2010, 12:01 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by benj1 View Post
For sure, 4B, you are getting great results. I seem to have curcurbit virus here; none of my curcurbits have been successful for several years.
You could try sprinkling the area you want to plant cucurbits liberally with baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).
An organic fungicide sprayed onto the soil a good time before planting cucurbits might work also.
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Old 11-09-2010, 12:23 AM   #22
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I just Googled that agrabon cloth to check it out and WILDLIFE GARDENERS was at the top of the list! WHOOP WHOOP
I think I know why wildlife gardeners came up at the top of your google search....

I spelled it wrong!!!

The correct spelling is Agribon, Also known as row cover fabric. Agribon is a brand name, there are many brands of cover fabric available. Costs vary depending on brand name, amount purchased and of course the place you purchase it from.

I purchased my Agribon row cover fabric from Johnnys Seeds. Simply because they had such a variety to chose from, different styles, widths, lengths, weights, etc.

Jonnys Seeds Agribon Row Cover Fabric

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Row Covers and Hardware

Fabric row covers are lightweight blankets made of spunbonded polypropylene which is sunlight, rain and air-permeable.
They offer 4 benefits:
1) Capturing warmth, resulting in healthier plant growth and earlier yields.
2) Protecting plants from damaging winds.
3) Most effective, least toxic, form of insect control.
4) Protecting your plants from light frost, thus extending the growing season.
I should mention that when emptying my circular compost cages to reverse the mulch (putting the most decayed stuff on top), I sit on a metal folding chair and use one of those short style shovels. This makes managing my mini-compost bins easy for me physically.

Whatever you use to line your wire cage, make sure it is poreous, but not overly so or it will dry out very quickly.
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Old 11-09-2010, 09:35 AM   #23
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Whatever you use to line your wire cage, make sure it is poreous, but not overly so or it will dry out very quickly.
The landscape fabric I mentioned does let water pass through and also blocks the weeds from coming through when laid upon the ground.
I think it should work out ok. It's not too expensive and holds up for years and years and years.
I dug through the foundation stones yesterday (that had been installed some 20 years ago) to tuck a bush in and found the old landscape fabric beneath them to be just as sound and strong as the day it was set in....Amazing!
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:39 PM   #24
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I've grown rambling plants like pumpkins, mini pumpkins, squash, zuchinni, watermelon, gourds and grapes in all kinds of places. Tubs, hanging planters, compost piles, fences, and even in the lawn.

...Attachment 21179 Attachment 21180Attachment 21181 Attachment 21182 Attachment 21178
Everything looks so great and healthy!

I like the idea of growing things in tubs. ...I may do that then bring them into the greenhouse when the weather gets colder.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:46 PM   #25
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I'm seriously thinking of digging up all the iris and tossing them on the driveway ...
This year I took out most of the iris and other perennials from the flower beds the previous owner planted...and then neglected, let get overgrown, and fill with tree seedlings.

There was a strip with irises on one side of the greenhouse, I took them out and am creating a lasagna garden on each of its sides. I hope I can make it look attractive.
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Old 02-22-2015, 02:27 PM   #26
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Seems I had mentioned wanting to remove my iris way back in 2010 and here it is already 5 years later.
Bout time I actually go about and do that.
The task has now been entered onto this years bucket list!
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Old 05-17-2015, 02:11 PM   #27
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All finished removing MOST of the iris, now on to the Edible Landscaping......

The deer eat up the majority of my tulips and hostas pretty much every year so last FALL I decided to edge the bed in garlic. Not only do I have as much garlic as I could possible need it seems to have had a real impact upon keeping the deer at bay. That is unless they moved on out of this area (which I highly doubt!) I actually have TULIPS in bloom. They aren't chomped off as they've been in the past.
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Old 07-02-2015, 12:06 AM   #28
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It was a very nice and interesting article.
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