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Old 03-19-2014, 08:14 PM   #1
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Default native companion plant species

There is a lot of info out there on the use of companion planting in the veggie garden to deter pest insects which negatively affect our crops; but, most of the suggested plants are not native. I have no problem with planting non-natives that I'm going to consume, like veggies and most herbs (although some herbs have now become invasive in the US). So here's my question: what native plant species make good companion plants in the veggie garden to deter pest insects? All I've seen recommended so far are Monarda species.
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Old 03-19-2014, 09:40 PM   #2
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What a great idea for a thread. I look forward to hearing some cool answers. The only things I know are not native, marigolds. Rosemary helps to keep deer away, but that is also not native, and not what you asked. Most discussions of companion plantings for vegetable gardens center around attracting pollinators, not around deterring pests.
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Old 03-19-2014, 10:46 PM   #3
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I know that nasturtiums are are effective to deter pest insects, too. Fortunately, it is also edible. Maybe some of the native Allium sp. would work.
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Old 03-20-2014, 08:46 PM   #4
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You could probably use something like Sun choke to let your peas or beans climb

I would think some thing like cup plant would be good for letting some cukes or squash to run through.

But I'm thinking since for generations our Fore-Fathers from Europe grew Heirloom Tomatoes and such the bad bugs will always seek out the juiciest plants.
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Old 03-21-2014, 08:02 AM   #5
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deer

I have garlic planted around my hosta beds....Perhaps "Wild leeks" would be a good choice.

I took a browse for you and merged a few suggestions from:
Top native plants for deterring deer – Cottage Life
Animal Advocates - How to humanely deter deer
http://voices.yahoo.com/natural-deer...64.html?cat=32

Quote:
Native plants evolved along with the deer, developing their own defenses [alkaloids and certain physical characteristics] that keep deer away."
(This list states "Native" to North America)
Quote:
Native plants to deter deer

• Foxglove beardtongue (Penstemon digitalis)
• Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
• Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
• Lance-leaved coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata)
• Lavender hyssop (Agastache foeniculum)
• Little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)
• Nodding onion (Allium cernuum)
• Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis)
• Side-oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula)
• Stiff goldenrod (Solidago rigida)
Quote:
Deer generally spurn thorny and highly aromatic plants (Sages, sagebrushes, wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa) and those with leathery, (buckeye's toxic; bay tree, too spicy) prickly or furry leaves (currants, barberries, rattlesnake master (Eryngium yuccifolium) and prickly pear cactus (Opuntia humifusa) Succulent plants and grasses are usually safe. Spurges are shunned for their milky sap.
One suggests... mixing Helenium, Butterfly Weed, and Wild Columbine with your favorite plants to naturally protect them from deer.

Quote:
California natives to consider: Western redbud, coyote brush, buckwheat, barberry, sage, wild ginger, iris, yarrow and monkeyflower.
It also states:
The more you water, the more juicy and tender the new growth, stems and leaves become.
"Grown dry" Natives develop a hard, less-appetizing texture!
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Old 03-21-2014, 08:10 AM   #6
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For those of you who live in the Adirondacks-New York area

Quote:
Beardtongue (Penstemon digitalis)
Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardii)
Blue flag iris (Iris versicolor)
Blue vervain (Verbena hastate)
Blue wood phlox (Phlox divaricata)
Culver’s root (Veronicastrum virginicum)
Foamflower (Tiarella cordifolia)
Flowering spurge (Euphorbia corollata)
Giant purple hyssop (Agastache scrophulariifolia)
Goldenrods (Solidago spp.)
Great blue lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica)
Crane’s bill (Geranium maculatum)
Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema spp.)
Jacob’s ladder (Polemonium vanbruntiae)
Maiden Hair Fern (Adiantum pedatum)
Mapleleaf viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium)
May-apple (Podophyllum peltatum)
Monkey flower (Mimulus alatus)
Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia)
New England aster (Aster novae-angliae)
Sneezeweed (Helenium autumnale)
Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)
Sweetflag (Acorus calamus)
Switch grass (Panicum virgatum)
Virgin’s-bower (Clematis virginiana)
Wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
Wild columbine (Aquilegia Canadensis)
Wild ginger (Asarum canadense)
http://www.lakegeorgeassociation.org...ives_1_000.pdf
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Old 03-22-2014, 06:11 AM   #7
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Take spicebush off the list of deer-repellent plants. If I don't spray ours with deer repellent every ten days or so, it gets eaten. Of course, our deer even eat rudbeckia hirta.
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Old 03-22-2014, 08:43 PM   #8
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Thanks for the list, Hava! I have many of those species in the flowerbeds. I also don't really have much trouble with deer getting into my veggie garden. Maybe it is because I predate them . My major issues are insect pests. Squash bugs are my #1 problem. I will be planting Nasturtium this year as a deterrent. Even though it is not native, at least I can eat it. I would love to find a native plant to deter squash bugs!! Do you ever get those?
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Old 03-22-2014, 08:47 PM   #9
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Sprucetree, I am growing sunchokes from seed for the first time this year. Can't wait to see what they do in the garden!

I also have a very healthy patch of Solidago that surrounds one of the veggie gardens. It is taking over as I slowly eradicate the privet thicket. Now there's an example of being grateful for an aggressive native!
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Old 03-22-2014, 09:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kchd View Post
Thanks for the list, Hava! I have many of those species in the flowerbeds. I also don't really have much trouble with deer getting into my veggie garden. Maybe it is because I predate them . My major issues are insect pests. Squash bugs are my #1 problem. I would love to find a native plant to deter squash bugs!! Do you ever get those?
Whoops...Sorry bout that. Guess I boinked right on over into deer when I read pests...Totally missing you were talking about "Insect" pests.
native companion plant species-p1080049.jpg
Would these the squash bugs you're speaking of?
I saw lots of those while in Florida. We have our share of them here too. Aren't those the ones that emit a quite unpleasant scent when disturbed?
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