Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Natural Gardeners Unite > Organic Gardening

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-18-2013, 07:30 PM   #11
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

A small (lower fenced in area) works well too. I think it's because there isn't much space for which to land before hitting the other side.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2013, 06:33 AM   #12
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
The hog panels can be cut with bolt cutters and they make excellent supports for vines... not so great for tomatoes though but.... stakes usually work well enough for those.
I'm curious about that comment - hog panels would seem perfect to me - giving plenty of support even late in the season, when the tomato plants are huge and heavy.

What makes them NOT your favorite for tomatoes?
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.

Last edited by biigblueyes; 06-22-2013 at 06:34 AM. Reason: removing extra stuff
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2013, 06:22 PM   #13
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

What about a garden that is all done. That is kind of an idea garden -
Attached Thumbnails
What would your “ideal” veggie garden look like if….-crafts-gourds-001.jpg  
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 05:03 PM   #14
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Hog panels are too hard to bend into the shape of a tomato cage. The other problem with them is using them as is and trying to tie tomato plants to them.... the tomato plants leaf out and it's hard sticking your arm through the panel to get to the tomatoes. Tomato cages and plain old stakes are probably our best bet.
--
liquid> that takes the prize for being the ideal garden!!!! A garden that somebody else put all their sweat equity into!!!
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 11:34 PM   #15
Fox
 
wildwatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northcentral rural Arkansas, usa
pawprint No idea what I would plant every year

I'm always a day-dreamer, and the question (what would your 'ideal' veggie garden look like...) just makes me close my eyes and smile.

The location, I have not far to go, actually just out the front door, I have this very gravelly clay base area that is adjacent to our existing Dogwood Arbor(mossy area). So as I day-dream, I think of the towering Red Oaks (4), that live there, I know the light green dappled light they allow to the ground should be plenty for a shady veggie garden. I imagine tending some plants under the protection of those long limbs. I think a veggie garden there would benefit the Red Oaks as they seem to like it when visitors are present. And they might like the new soil arrangements I would make...I'm pretty sure they have never had beans growing over their spreading roots.

But before I have some garden worthy dirt trucked in like Equilibrium has had done in her front yard, I think Havalotta's idea of underground irrigation would be really tricky & fun to install, I would make it not only for the new veggie garden, but also at least provide a tap for the adjacent Dogwood Arbor also. The thing about these oaks is they are approx. 30' apart, so the canopy they provide does allow approx. 6 hrs of always dappled sunshine, should be enough.

The area is bounded without fence but very light use driveways which should keep the plot well drained, and easily accessible from any direction. About those Red Oaks tho, I day-dream of cleaning around each one, raking and shoveling, chopping some of the other existing plants out of there, I rake the dirt & rock out of the roots all the way around the things in a radial pattern. Expecting that the new humus rich garden dirt I will bring in, will mix with the loosened clay and rock and the trees will be glad I was there. That first base layer will be thick as first, and I will be happy to walk & water & pack it down, only thinking of the trees at this point, careful grading, push the dirt up on the tree, then raking it away in radial patterns from the trunk outward. This should provide a depression in the grade around the trees.

I know...LOL...I play these ideas in my mind, and pull a few off every now and then. Anyway once I have all the Red Oaks all safely graded, I'll make myself some boundary around the trees, as I know my tendency is to bring more dirt (for the veggie garden) and layer it thicker again, but the thick additional layer should not go up against the trees, just to the boundary. Then I shall do the same to the (2) White oaks, they are on the N side and their thick dark shade won't affect the veggies below. There are a few other understory trees in there, but they are somewhat near the N side with the White Oaks, so again their deep shade is Ok with me, besides I want some fun flowers to hang out there anyway. But the veggie garden dirt treatment will extend to the N boundary, because I like the idea of 'extra dirt' nearby.

What is 'ideal' about this veggie garden? It is fun to think about.

Weird game huh.

ww
__________________
"Actuality, be what you are" -Charlie Parks
wildwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 03:22 PM   #16
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
Hog panels are too hard to bend into the shape of a tomato cage.
Oh! Use the hog panels instead of wire for fencing. It doesn't sag and your posts don't give you problems when you try to take the slack out of it.
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 06:54 PM   #17
Fox
 
wildwatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northcentral rural Arkansas, usa
pawprint a few layout sketchs for shady veg. garden

Maybe these pix will show what my day-dream might look like.

ww
Attached Thumbnails
What would your “ideal” veggie garden look like if….-dream-garden-001.jpg   What would your “ideal” veggie garden look like if….-dream-garden-006.jpg  
__________________
"Actuality, be what you are" -Charlie Parks
wildwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2013, 11:55 AM   #18
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

~~
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2013, 08:50 AM   #19
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

biig> I did use left over hog panels.... for pea and bean supports!!! I just couldn't bend them into the shape of a tomato cage though for the bush varieties... I'm not strong enough.
--
wildman> I can't read the labels on your photos. You've got an awful lot of shade there. What are you planning on growing.... native spring ephemerals and native shade tolerant grasses and sedges.... more moss or.... early food crops like spinach and lettuce? That looks like an ideal area for shrooms and woodlant ferns too!!! Just curious.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2013, 01:37 PM   #20
Fox
 
wildwatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northcentral rural Arkansas, usa
pawprint my 'ideal' garden is not realistic?

Oh sorry about the unclear labels, the 'red area' would be for gardening. The yellow is for 'driveway area'...except around the big trees, those are also denoted with yellow and would be thinner depth of added dirt over those root areas of the big trees...which would be good for perennial wildflowers, ferns, & shrubs.

I would try all sorts of normal garden plants, lettuce, watermelons, whatever. I'm finding in my regular garden area that has no shade between 10:00 & 14:30 each day, just swelters under the sunlight. But that regular garden does OK, the rest of the time. I just don't like seeing my beans, squash, lettuce all of 'em, go into 'OMG it is too hot' mode. The only time they don't go into the OMG mode is when I water before 07:00, and I don't like making the plants so dependent on me bringing the water everyday. That is why I was thinking 'just grow 'em in the dappled, all day shade'.

If I had some success in the dappled shade garden, I could try planting some sun loving stuff like fruit trees or let the wild black berries grow where my regular garden is now.

Did you know this trick?...that if you click on a pix, and it comes up in that special frame...click on it again, and it will open in it's own frame, of which you can hold down the CTRL button & scroll UP or DOWN to zoom in or out. Still wasn't much help on my unclear labels, but I didn't know if you know the trick.

ww
__________________
"Actuality, be what you are" -Charlie Parks
wildwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
design, garden, ideal, if…, layout, veggie, “ideal”

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2