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Old 01-26-2013, 11:45 AM   #11
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I've started using coconut coir as my seed starting medium. Last year I bought a bag of "ready to use" seed starter that was coconut coir with some added perlite. I was happy with it. This year, I bought compressed bricks of coconut coir to use.
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Old 01-26-2013, 12:16 PM   #12
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Several years ago I planned to open a propagating green house, which never happened. But as a result I have crates of coconut coir. It seems to be naturally anti-fungal and is great for rooting camellias and other plants. I can imagine it would be great for starting seeds in plugs also. They would be "ready to go" to repot and grow.

Also, coconut coir is "renewable" where as there is some question about the future availability of peat.
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Old 01-26-2013, 04:00 PM   #13
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Hazelnut,
The anti-fungal and the renewable characteristics of coconut coir are exactly why I like it over peat. I also find it easier to wet than peat.
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Old 01-26-2013, 05:31 PM   #14
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It seems to have the right pH and consistency too. Its amazing to make a flat of cuttings in coir plugs and the next time your look at them, there is a root ball full of fresh little white roots.
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:17 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kchd View Post
I've started using coconut coir as my seed starting medium. Last year I bought a bag of "ready to use" seed starter that was coconut coir with some added perlite. I was happy with it. This year, I bought compressed bricks of coconut coir to use.
I need something to start my seeds--not just the veggies, but a LOT of native seeds as well. I'm trying to figure out where to get something without going broke. Compressed coconu coir has piqued my interest. Where do you get it, how much does it cost, and can I use it as I would potting soil?
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:19 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelnut View Post
It seems to be naturally anti-fungal and is great for rooting camellias and other plants. I can imagine it would be great for starting seeds in plugs also. They would be "ready to go" to repot and grow.

Also, coconut coir is "renewable" where as there is some question about the future availability of peat.
Sounds good to me!
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:34 PM   #17
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coconut coir.

It is available at Amazon. It comes in bricks which you soak. The bricks make quite a bit of medium. I like to use it in the plug flats rather than in the regular seedling flats. The plugs are quite a bit deeper for a really healthy root system.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:14 PM   #18
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coconut coir.

It is available at Amazon. It comes in bricks which you soak. The bricks make quite a bit of medium. I like to use it in the plug flats rather than in the regular seedling flats. The plugs are quite a bit deeper for a really healthy root system.
Thanks, hazelnut, I'll check it out.

I agree, a bigger and deeper pot is preferred. For my wildflower seedlings, I've been using window boxes...and I hope to find some other large low containers to accommodate all of the seeds I have to plant this year--probably more than ten times the seeds I've planted in the past.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:28 PM   #19
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Coconut coir is good "stuff". I've used it for orchids and some carnivorous plants. I do use a peat mix for starting my veggie seeds because I don't want any problems with damping off. I'm starting inside a greenhouse though and even with intakes and exhausts and fans.... the air circulation isn't what it would be if the seed was being started outside. If our weather was good enough to start seed in the open air, I'd back off of the peat mix I currently use in favor of a compost mic. Tomatoes and squash don't seem to have any problems sprouting in my composters... the composters are outdoors though.
--
I've got about 10 bricks of coir sitting around since I gave away all my Nepenthes and most of my orchids. Maybe I should try starting a tray of tomatoes then check what bricks are selling for these days.
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Old 01-27-2013, 01:51 AM   #20
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Wildwatcher - aha - that makes sense. I was kinda wondering what you mean about the mistakes. As for the parsley - you mean keeping the seeds damp until they sprout? Dad says his mom would cover the seeds with a damp dishtowel, and I believe he's used a board on top of the dirt until they sprout.

I have had good luck starting them in a mini greenhouse. Otherwise known as the clear plastic clamshells you get salad or sandwiches in.
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