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Old 06-03-2010, 08:06 PM   #1
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After work, I finally mustered up enough energy to get out and mow the paths of my "meadow in the making". Afterwards, I walked the paths. I love walking my paths and looking around. Among the invasives that I'm battling, I see the areas that I've established natives, and other areas where they've come up by themselves.

There were some asters coming up among the unmowed grass at the edge of the path. I went to pinch them back so I'd have a shorter, bushier plant that was less likely to fall into the path as it go older. On the top leaf, I spotted a leaf hopper. As I went to pinch it back, I noticed more of the leaf hoppers on the underside of the leaves. I thought that would be what I'd post about, but as I thought of posting, I heard something and looked up to see a doe run up the hill to the upper level where I stood!

She must have been no more than 15 feet away when she stopped and looked around. She didn't seem upset, but I'm guessing she stopped for a reason. She still hadn't spotted me at this point. I thought about slowly reaching for my cell phone to try to take a picture, but that would have scared her and I'd never have had time to even open the lens cover.

In a moment she looked at me, we looked at each other for a moment or two more, and she turned around and bounded back down the hill.

I just wanted to share! =)
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Old 06-03-2010, 08:10 PM   #2
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What a terrific story, David! Maybe she bounded up the hill because she wanted to thank you for what you've been doing to the land!
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Old 06-03-2010, 08:18 PM   #3
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... Maybe she bounded up the hill because she wanted to thank you for what you've been doing to the land!
Thank you for making me smile.

~smile~
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Old 06-03-2010, 10:09 PM   #4
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I love walking my paths and looking around. Among the invasives that I'm battling, I see the areas that I've established natives, and other areas where they've come up by themselves.
I love that feeling too-- the feeling that, "yes, this is working!". A few weeks ago, I spotted one lonely early monarch and some native bees on a small stand of Lead plant I put in-- it was about the only thing blooming at that time, and it was very popular for awhile. And last weekend I realized that my Celadine poppies had reseeded themselves (hooray) so I was able to transplant and spread them into new areas.
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Old 06-04-2010, 04:06 AM   #5
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dapjwy-
I'd say your native plantings are paying off judged by your lovely encouter with nature!

My Nature Encounter Today....
As I was planting my baby bunchberries under the big oaktrees in our meadow, Flora (3 year old male black bear) was sitting next to me observing me with much curiousity. I was wishing for some way to explain to Flora that the bunchberries can't be eaten until they grow up. They are a bear favorite, so that's probably wishful thinking. Lacking the sounds for complete bear communication other than "smooch/lip smack" for come, "huff" for danger, foot stomp for "go away, I was here first," and foot lick/sniff for "hello, I know you!" (The bear licking my feet not me licking bear paws), I couldn't think of anything to say in bear language for "wait." As in wait until these plants grow up and start producing yummy berries.

I just thought it was rather ironic to be planting something for wildlife, while having the wildlife I was planting it for, sitting right next to me. Flora's gaze shifted up, so I turned and looked. Across the meadow, entering the woods was Miney (Flora's Step Sister) with her new object de' romance, BigBear.

Brings new meaning to the phrase "If you plant it, they will come."
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Old 06-04-2010, 09:25 AM   #6
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Thanks for sharing that great story, David. I know from experience that those are special moments silently communicating with wildlife.
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Old 06-04-2010, 07:14 PM   #7
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I love that feeling too-- the feeling that, "yes, this is working!". A few weeks ago, I spotted one lonely early monarch and some native bees on a small stand of Lead plant I put in-- it was about the only thing blooming at that time, and it was very popular for awhile. And last weekend I realized that my Celadine poppies had reseeded themselves (hooray) so I was able to transplant and spread them into new areas.
Thank you for relating and for sharing your little joys! ~smile~

It is a great feeling, isn't it?
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Old 06-04-2010, 07:26 PM   #8
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dapjwy-
I'd say your native plantings are paying off judged by your lovely encouter with nature!

My Nature Encounter Today....
As I was planting my baby bunchberries under the big oaktrees in our meadow, Flora (3 year old male black bear) was sitting next to me observing me with much curiousity. I was wishing for some way to explain to Flora that the bunchberries can't be eaten until they grow up. They are a bear favorite, so that's probably wishful thinking. Lacking the sounds for complete bear communication other than "smooch/lip smack" for come, "huff" for danger, foot stomp for "go away, I was here first," and foot lick/sniff for "hello, I know you!" (The bear licking my feet not me licking bear paws), I couldn't think of anything to say in bear language for "wait." As in wait until these plants grow up and start producing yummy berries.

I just thought it was rather ironic to be planting something for wildlife, while having the wildlife I was planting it for, sitting right next to me. Flora's gaze shifted up, so I turned and looked. Across the meadow, entering the woods was Miney (Flora's Step Sister) with her new object de' romance, BigBear.

Brings new meaning to the phrase "If you plant it, they will come."
Yes, it is a good feeling to see things paying off. I'm sure there were deer and other wildlife here before I started, but I do think I'm attracting more things and creating more habitat by not mowing everything down.

As for your bears: Wow! Everytime you share your bear stories, I'm amazed. I love the idea of feeling that much of a connection with wild animals. At the same time, I am slightly concerned about your safety. I remember hearing about a man who lived with bears for years until they killed him and his girlfriend. ...I just did a quick search: Timothy Treadwell

Enjoy, but be careful. ~hugs~
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Old 06-04-2010, 07:46 PM   #9
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Thanks for sharing that great story, David. I know from experience that those are special moments silently communicating with wildlife.

I'm thrilled to be part of a group who enjoys and relates to these kind of stories. I'm so glad that you found us and that you contribute so much with such enthusiasm

As for communicating with wildlife, I learned a lot from Becky about bear communication! (Thanks, Becky.) Also, it reminded me of another encounter I had with a deer in a local park. I was walking a trail alone when I met up with a deer--not nearly as close as yesterday's encounter. I had been taking sign language classes at that time and in the quiet of the woods, I signed things like "beautiful deer" and stuff. She seemed mesmerized and watched me for quite a long time. It was a neat experience. I would have tried it again yesterday, but at first I didn't want to draw attention to my being there. When she saw me she seemed a little shocked, then skittish, and next thing I knew, she ran off.
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Old 06-04-2010, 09:28 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by BooBooBearBecky View Post
dapjwy-
I'd say your native plantings are paying off judged by your lovely encouter with nature!

My Nature Encounter Today....
As I was planting my baby bunchberries under the big oaktrees in our meadow, Flora (3 year old male black bear) was sitting next to me observing me with much curiousity. I was wishing for some way to explain to Flora that the bunchberries can't be eaten until they grow up. They are a bear favorite, so that's probably wishful thinking. Lacking the sounds for complete bear communication other than "smooch/lip smack" for come, "huff" for danger, foot stomp for "go away, I was here first," and foot lick/sniff for "hello, I know you!" (The bear licking my feet not me licking bear paws), I couldn't think of anything to say in bear language for "wait." As in wait until these plants grow up and start producing yummy berries.

I just thought it was rather ironic to be planting something for wildlife, while having the wildlife I was planting it for, sitting right next to me. Flora's gaze shifted up, so I turned and looked. Across the meadow, entering the woods was Miney (Flora's Step Sister) with her new object de' romance, BigBear.

Brings new meaning to the phrase "If you plant it, they will come."
Boo Boo,

I really enjoy hearing about these interactions you enjoy with animals so very rare to me. I've but seen one wild bear in my life - in Jasper, Canada. To read of your familiarity with a clan of them is enchanting. thanks!
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