Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > North American Wildlife

Reply
 
LinkBack (1) Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-07-2010, 01:57 PM   #1
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default What do you mean Chicago has no wildlife???

Chicago Wildlife News

http://www.chicagowildlifenews.com/2009/10/walking-with-wildlife-chicagos-go-to.html

Chicago has a lot of parks and rivers and canals and old rail yards and other spaces where wildlife lives.
Lake Michigan is a major migration flyway so every spring and autumn birds are everywhere. Many even nest here. I see hawks and kestrals on a regular basis.
Cops shot a cougar, talk about confirmed siting.
Personally I have seen garter snakes, frogs, bats, birds, coyotes,a fox,a shrew,rabbits, squirrels,opossum, and turtles. All except the fox and the turtle right in our own garden.

If you add all the bees,butterflies,dragonflies and other insects that abound you begin to see that an urban area does not preclude wildlife.

So keep gardening for wildlife all fellow urban dwellers.
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 02:39 PM   #2
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

Milwaukee has wildlife also. Wisconsin is home to Wild Ones-
Native Plants, Natural Landscapes
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 03:14 PM   #3
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

I seem to remember reading that Tucson Arizona has the most diverse wildlife found in a city, maybe partly because so many of the people living there garden with native plants (water restrictions and all)and have never had to use much in the way of chemicals.
Some local governments are seeing the wisdom of green space for saving money and improving the welfare of its citizens so are changing ordinances and helping with cost. Madison with its grant to help pay for establishing a rain garden on your property is an example that has become a great place to visit if you want to see what a working rain garden looks like after it matures.

I see The Wild Ones have been updating their website. I have often wished that site had more substance. I am a plant person and gardener first and foremost.
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 03:30 PM   #4
Grub
 
gnomenative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Montgomery, Illinois
Default

Actually, Wild Ones will be entirely re-creating their national site. I am on the WO national website team. No release time as of yet, but it should be a much better site!
__________________
It's the flock, the grove, that matters. Our responsibility is to species, not to specimens; to communities, not to individuals." ~Sara Stein
Living Landscapes: http://www.livinglandscapescompany.com/
gnomenative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 03:37 PM   #5
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Thank you gnomenative, I will look for that.
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2010, 02:44 AM   #6
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Nope!!! No wildlife in urban settings...
Urban Habitats This blog has it all across the globe but you'll still like it.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2010, 03:37 AM   #7
Heron
 
jpdenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Tinley Park, Illinois, USA
Default

And the city is surrounded by many areas with plenty of wildlife too. While natural areas tend to be little patches surrounded by development, there's still lots to see, if you know how and where to look, as documented in the excellent but possibly defunct Chicago Wilderness magazine. Their site (click here) has links to articles from their back issues, lots of interesting things to read there. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for a link to the back issues.

John
__________________
Click here for an album of some of my nature photos.
jpdenk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2010, 05:05 AM   #8
Mentor
 
midwesternerr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: STLOUIS USA
Default

Cities offer another advantage too: It's easier to find the wildlife! For example, Aububon groups typically offer field trips to previously scouted locations. Lots of urban parks offer a checklist of what has been seen there, so it makes it easier to try to find a good place to search. The winter is a good time to look for owls. In St. Louis, you can either join hikes or a mailing list to find current bird locations.

There are several good, urban St. Louis parks for wildlife

Forest Park & Tower Grove Park are good for bird watching (migrants, kingfishers, hawks,, owls, etc), flying squirrels, frogs/turtles. There are some coyote and fox in and near those areas but they are seen rather randomly. Those are two of the most urban and easily located parks to visit. The lined snake is still present in some of the most urban parts of St. Louis.

North of St. Louis just a few miles, there are good sites for viewing eagles (Riverlands, & the highway to Grafton, IL)
midwesternerr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2010, 09:18 PM   #9
Heron
 
Prairiefreak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: NE IL, USA
Default

Ummm...I lived for 30 years 1 mile or much less from I-90. Division and Milwaukee. Damen and Chicago. Armitage and Milwaukee. North and Ashland. Fullerton and Western. Believe me, I was looking for native wildlife. Didn't find any. Now, I found them on the outskirts, for sure...but in the neighborhood I lived in, i.e., where I could afford to live...nope.

I'm sure people who could afford to live along the North Branch and in Ravenswood had plenty of native wildlife. Which, incidentally, is where the Chicago PD shot the cougar.

And don't even get me going on those stupid Chicago cops who shot that cougar. They chased that poor animal for 6 hours....and they couldn't get someone there to dart it? Please. They were really happy when they shot it, too, FYI.
__________________
"The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.....and spiders." Me and Franky D.
Prairiefreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2010, 01:24 AM   #10
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Hey... I resemble that remark... I lived in Harbor Point for 4 years. We didn't have much wildlife back when Mayor Washington was in office but... things change. There's hope. I've seen some of the restoration work Daley is pushing. Looking good!!! Looking good!!! The cougar... no words for that fiasco.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chicago, chicago parks, chicago wildlife, parks, parks in chicago, wildlife

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


LinkBacks (?)
LinkBack to this Thread: http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/north-american-wildlife/4861-what-do-you-mean-chicago-has-no-wildlife.html
Posted By For Type Date
Here comes the hawk On the Shores of Lake Chicago This thread Refback 01-26-2010 03:41 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2