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Old 07-18-2009, 01:15 PM   #1
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Default Sylvatic Plague detected in Badlands National Park

Sylvatic Plague detected in Badlands National Park
By Journal staff | Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Rapid City Journal | News » Top | Sylvatic Plague detected in Badlands National Park
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Badlands National Park official are encouraging visitors to use common-sense safety precautions around wildlife in the park, following the confirmation of sylvatic plague and tularemia among park prairie dogs.

Sylvatic plague was confirmed July 1 in a prairie dog colony in the Sage Creek Wilderness Area in the park. This marks the first time the flea-borne bacterial disease, which can decimate prairie dog populations and pose a threat to endangered black-footed ferrets, has been confirmed in the park itself.
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Old 07-18-2009, 11:12 PM   #2
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"Pets should also be carefully controlled in areas where plague is present, to prevent them from wandering into prairie dog colonies, potentially coming in contact with fleas." When I was there people were letting their dogs run off leash. I didn't see anyone with a pooper scooper either. I can't help but think they should make the entire park off limits to pets. Do they think the sylvatic plague and tularemia jumped states and hitched a ride on air currents to infect the prairie dogs of South Dakota?
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Old 02-08-2010, 02:33 PM   #3
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Default Sick Puppies

Sick Puppies
Prairie dogs served up Jell-O spiked with ‘black death’ vaccine
by Amy Mayer

Conservation Magazine » Blog Archive » Sick Puppies
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You’ll have to forgive prairie dogs if they feel like sitting ducks. For starters, the burrowing rodents face an epidemic of sylvatic plague, a disease sparked by the same bacteria as the “black death” that ravaged Europe in the middle ages. What’s more, the researchers behind a new vaccine don’t have the prairie dogs’ best interests at heart: their real goal is to ensure that black-footed ferrets, who dine on prairie dogs after invading their burrows, have a steady supply of healthy food...
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Old 02-08-2010, 04:27 PM   #4
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dragonfly01 Pispisa / Prairie dogs, etc.

I don't have a problem with prairie dogs (pispisa) getting vaccine via jello.. I have a huge problem with the idiots who think Tunkashila made them to be little moving targets for 'sport' "hunting". That isn't 'hunting'; it's slaughter, since they don't use the little people they slaughter for anything except slaughter.. And ferrets gotta eat, too.

Up in my area, there are a few black-footed ferrets, but none of us who know where they are will tell Game n Fish because so far, they are healthy, as are the pispisa they feed on & it seems like every time someone does the 'good citizen' thing & tells Game & Fish about a previously unknown population of either pispisa or black-footed ferrets, soon after, the slaughterers are out, the ferret population drops even further, & the pispisa have disease. Makes me wonder what the vector is for the fleas when there's no disease before Game n Fish & the slaughterers, & soon after either of them show up, there is. There is no such thing as 'accidental' or 'mere' coincidence, takoszja..
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Old 03-08-2010, 08:01 PM   #5
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Default Enzootic Plague Reduces Black-Footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes) Survival in Montana

Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Enzootic Plague Reduces Black-Footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes) Survival in Montana
To cite this article:
Marc R. Matchett, Dean E. Biggins, Valerie Carlson, Bradford Powell, Tonie Rocke. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. January/February 2010, 10(1): 27-35. doi:10.1089/vbz.2009.0053.
Published in Volume: 10 Issue 1: February 16, 2010

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. - Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases - 10(1):27
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Abstract

Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret reintroduction areas by conducting flea control for 3 years. Beginning in 2004, about half of the ferrets residing on dusted and nondusted colonies were vaccinated against plague with an experimental vaccine (F1-V fusion protein). We evaluated 6-month reencounter rates (percentage of animals observed at the end of an interval that were known alive at the beginning of the interval), an index to survival, for ferrets in four treatment groups involving all combinations of vaccination and flea control. For captive-reared ferrets (115 individuals observed across 156 time intervals), reencounter rates were higher for vaccinates (0.44) than for nonvaccinates (0.23, p=0.044) on colonies without flea control, but vaccination had no detectable effect on colonies with flea control (vaccinates=0.41, nonvaccinates=0.42, p=0.754). Flea control resulted in higher reencounter rates for nonvaccinates (p=0.026), but not for vaccinates (p=0.508). The enhancement of survival due to vaccination or flea control supports the hypothesis that enzootic plague reduces ferret survival, even when there was no noticeable decline in prairie dog abundance. The collective effects of vaccination and flea control compel a conclusion that fleas are required for maintenance, and probably transmission, of plague at enzootic levels. Other studies have demonstrated similar effects of flea control on several species of prairie dogs and, when combined with this study, suggest that the effects of enzootic plague are widespread. Finally, we demonstrated that the experimental F1-V fusion protein vaccine provides protection to ferrets in the wild.
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