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Old 04-06-2009, 09:06 AM   #1
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Default Bone Deformities Linked to Inbreeding in Wolves of Isle Royale

Bone Deformities Linked to Inbreeding in Wolves of Isle Royle

Newswise Science News | Bone Deformities Linked to Inbreeding in Wolves of Isle Royle
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Genetic Rescue?

"What we learned raises the question of whether the wolves of Isle Royale should be genetically rescued," Vucetich said.

Up to now, wildlife management agencies in the US and Scandinavia have cited the Isle Royale wolves as proof that small wolf populations can avoid genetic deterioration and remain viable.

"Our study removes one more example that some use to downplay the consequences of genetic deterioration," the Swedish scientist Raikkonen says.
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The decision is complicated, Vucetich observes. "It involves balancing values associated with wilderness, scientific knowledge, healthy ecosystems and animal welfare," he points out. "If only one value mattered, the decision would be easier, but here the values are competing."

Adds Peterson, "This is not a decision just for scientists to make any more."
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:07 AM   #2
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Default Wolves, Moose, and Michigan Tech

Wolves, Moose, and Michigan Tech
by Jennifer Donovan

http://www.mtu.edu/research/archives/magazine/2008/
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The ranks of the wolves and moose of Isle Royale may be thinning, but as the study enters its fiftieth year, the predator-prey research is going strong.

Wildlife ecologists Rolf Peterson and John Vucetich, from Michigan Tech’s School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, and graduate student, Joseph Bump, have compiled data for four new research studies and are preparing papers for scientific journals during the Isle Royale wolf-moose study’s golden anniversary year.
The studies examine
* how arthritis in moose is linked to prenatal nutrition,
* how wolves affect the evolution of the size of moose,
* how wolves cause plants to grow bigger, and
* how moose teeth reveal the effectiveness of legislation designed to lower mercury levels.
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Old 04-06-2009, 11:49 AM   #3
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Reality check> small wolf populations evidently can NOT avoid genetic deterioration and remain viable. This seems like a no-brainer. If the public values the wolf and moose populations on that island, they better do something about the inbreeding.
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