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Old 06-08-2010, 12:27 PM   #1
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Default Even Small Patches of Urban Woods Are Valuable for Migrating Birds

"Even Small Patches of Urban Woods Are Valuable for Migrating Birds"
ScienceDaily (June 8, 2010)

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Even tiny patches of woods in urban areas seem to provide adequate food and protection for some species of migrating birds as they fly between wintering and breeding grounds, new research has found.
Quote:
These findings suggest that remnant forests within urban areas have conservation value for Swainson's Thrushes and, potentially, other migrant landbirds," Rodewald said. "Obviously, larger forest patches are better, but even smaller ones are worth saving."
Every native patch really helps!
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Old 03-03-2012, 04:20 AM   #2
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One of the books I read during the summer reading program when I was a kid was about native Americans and bison on the plains..Reading a good book in the summer was started after breakfast, Having good Comprehension skills let my imagination take me right near the thundering snorting herd and then savor the echo of the herd after they crested the next hill..Sometimes friends would start a ball game or go bike riding after lunch. But some days it was just me and my brown covered series of adventure books. Of course there was a 20 foot wide creek next door to explore which went for miles but I was restricted to the length from my elementary school to the candy store on the busy road. I wouldn't walk the creek to the elementary school library but the sidewalk, I was always careful with the books and feared I might slip and have a book fall in the creek. I noticed how the plants all looked dead but the bush I identified as pussy willow had insects first. Then came the spiders followed by flies and so on. It was a rare sight but in the spring the pike would swim from the lake up the creek fins and scales shining in the light fighting the current. A few years later a traffic light was installed at the candy store and my peer group discovered an urban forest and a pond filled with cattails. Of course asking my parents might get a No so I went on my own crossing the street in the crosswalk. Of course the pond had tadpoles and the woods was full of birds I'd never seen in my neighborhood before. Even just being a few acres and probably not having any trees of massive size it was close to water and had decent sized snags that Cooper's Hawks and at least 1 woodpecker called home, I didn't have to keep my secret long as the next year I began Junior High and made some friends that lived on the other side of the busy street. I merely told my parents that I had a new friend and could I cross at the light. It was a hesitant yes so to seal the deal I got a job delivering papers. You guessed it everyday after my route I'd go sit in that little woods, Needless to say that little woods was a hang-out for our age group well into the teens. Not only can some birds stop for a rest and a meal and others make it home the children can use some green space too, Even if it helps one kid out it might be the poor soul who carries a gun to school and harms others.
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Old 03-03-2012, 07:14 AM   #3
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An educational reform movement I can wholeheartedly support is the one to "leave no child inside."
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:37 PM   #4
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When I wrote that I heard that this the Anniversary of Columbine, Our formation years are the most important and we use our experiences from them to live in society. I never believed that TV, Music, or Video Games were a cause..It may be a by-product but children who join the scouts, Go to nature summer camps or even like me who's big project after dinner was looking for tomato horn worms after dinner while carrying buckets of water for the plants will give children an outlet with-out lashing out.
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:40 PM   #5
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sprucetree, what a powerful post!

Thank you for sharing your memory and your insight.

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Originally Posted by sprucetree View Post
One of the books I read during the summer reading program when I was a kid was about native Americans and bison on the plains..Reading a good book in the summer was started after breakfast, Having good Comprehension skills let my imagination take me right near the thundering snorting herd and then savor the echo of the herd after they crested the next hill..Sometimes friends would start a ball game or go bike riding after lunch. But some days it was just me and my brown covered series of adventure books. Of course there was a 20 foot wide creek next door to explore which went for miles but I was restricted to the length from my elementary school to the candy store on the busy road. I wouldn't walk the creek to the elementary school library but the sidewalk, I was always careful with the books and feared I might slip and have a book fall in the creek. I noticed how the plants all looked dead but the bush I identified as pussy willow had insects first. Then came the spiders followed by flies and so on. It was a rare sight but in the spring the pike would swim from the lake up the creek fins and scales shining in the light fighting the current. A few years later a traffic light was installed at the candy store and my peer group discovered an urban forest and a pond filled with cattails. Of course asking my parents might get a No so I went on my own crossing the street in the crosswalk. Of course the pond had tadpoles and the woods was full of birds I'd never seen in my neighborhood before. Even just being a few acres and probably not having any trees of massive size it was close to water and had decent sized snags that Cooper's Hawks and at least 1 woodpecker called home, I didn't have to keep my secret long as the next year I began Junior High and made some friends that lived on the other side of the busy street. I merely told my parents that I had a new friend and could I cross at the light. It was a hesitant yes so to seal the deal I got a job delivering papers. You guessed it everyday after my route I'd go sit in that little woods, Needless to say that little woods was a hang-out for our age group well into the teens. Not only can some birds stop for a rest and a meal and others make it home the children can use some green space too, Even if it helps one kid out it might be the poor soul who carries a gun to school and harms others.
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebek56 View Post
An educational reform movement I can wholeheartedly support is the one to "leave no child inside."
~smile~
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Old 03-03-2012, 10:25 PM   #7
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Thanks Dapjwy.. I was trying to brighten up everyone's weekend with the Tornadoes and Old Winter still having a grip on the NE and Midwest by posting some childhood memories. Haven't seen any Robins yet but they should be here in a few weeks and the Pussy Willows will be fully open by then too.
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Old 03-04-2012, 12:12 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprucetree View Post
Thanks Dapjwy.. I was trying to brighten up everyone's weekend with the Tornadoes and Old Winter still having a grip on the NE and Midwest by posting some childhood memories. Haven't seen any Robins yet but they should be here in a few weeks and the Pussy Willows will be fully open by then too.

I've been keeping my eye out for the red-winged blackbirds return...but I think I'm getting a little ahead of myself...but it can't be too long now.

...and, although we have had two snows in the past two weeks, I don't think winter had a grip on us at all this year! Aside from the fact that nothing has been growing for months, it hasn't been bad at all for me.

I hope everyone is safe from the tornadoes and other strong winds that accompany such weather.
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