Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Reduce That Ecological Footprint > North American News and Current Events

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-13-2010, 12:30 PM   #1
WG Staff
 
Staff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default NY- Unwanted, unloved and living here

Unwanted, unloved and living here
If it slithers, stings, eats or just grows, the state wants invasive species gone
By Brian Nearing, Staff writer
First published in print: Thursday, April 8, 2010

Unwanted, unloved and living here -- Page 1 -- Times Union - Albany NY
excerpt from above:
Quote:
ALBANY -- The state is compiling a hit list of invasive plants, animals and insects -- from exotic invaders like a voracious Chinese fish to ornamental shrubs available at the local nursery.

A report by the state Invasive Species Council recommends the creation of a ranking system to judge the danger presented by a particular species, and a complementary set of state fines against anyone possessing the most risky specimens.

The proposed system would be New York's first comprehensive approach to prohibiting or regulating commerce in invasive plants and animals to...
__________________
The tendency of man's nature to good is like the tendency of water to flow downwards.
-Mencius
Staff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 12:31 PM   #2
WG Staff
 
Staff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default Council Proposes Action to Protect Forests, Farmlands and Waterway from Invasive Species

Council Proposes Action to Protect Forests, Farmlands and Waterway from Invasive Species
This story was released on 2010-04-06

Media-Newswire.com - Press Release Distribution - PR Agency
excerpt from above:
Quote:
(Media-Newswire.com) - For the first time, New York would classify non-native plants and animals to help prevent the spread of invasive species through waterways, forests and farmlands, under a proposal unveiled today by the state Invasive Species Council.

The Council released a draft report, "A Regulatory System for Non-Native Species," that calls for a multi-pronged approach to tackling one of the state's fastest growing environmental threats. Among other recommendations, the Council proposed a new assessment system for invasive species - such as zebra mussels, Sirex wood wasps and Eurasian milfoil - that would allow the state to categorize them as "prohibited," "regulated" or "unregulated." Such a classification system would...
__________________
The tendency of man's nature to good is like the tendency of water to flow downwards.
-Mencius
Staff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 01:20 PM   #3
POM Judge & Official Non Gardener
 
Sage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Default

gudgreef...no wonder the DEC people can't get their real work done...
Sage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 02:54 PM   #4
Salamander
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Annapolis, MD
Default

Actually, I wish we had something like that here--even if things were just broadly labeled, "This plant/animal is not native to the continental US and may have the potential to become invasive" at least people couldn't say they didn't know, and it brings it to their consciousness that there are native alternatives available.

Many people just assume that if it's for sale in a nursery, it must be fine to plant.
Dare I draw a parallel between the quality of plants in a nursery and the quality of "food" in a grocery store?

I know several large mail-order nurseries that don't obviously identify native and non-native plants. It would be a simple matter to add a symbol.

Without getting too political, I'd think that in this age of xenoph. . .
Ahem. . . Patriotism!, nurseries and other similar businesses could easily capitalize on native plants' status by putting a little US flag symbol next to them to indicate that they are indeed native plants and not imported from some other country or continent. And wouldn't it be great if the non-native symbol was the same little flag with the universal 'no' sign over it, like the No-Smoking symbol. I wonder how quickly that would effect gardener's purchases and the nurseries that propagate all those non-native nuisance plants?

Hmmn. . . today's cloudy, damp weather must be making me cross. . .
Teresa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 03:20 PM   #5
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Default

This kind of action is not only possible, it's doable. Wisconsin has already done it:
Invasive Species - WDNR

Beside the obvious benefits to the environment, it allows environmentally responsible businesses to at least compete on a level playing field with environmentally irresponsible businesses.
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 05:52 PM   #6
Fox
 
Bulucanagria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: S. Grafton, Massachusetts
Default

Some time ago there was an article in one of the local papers talking about invasives and why they were a problem. One of the environmentalists interviewed stated that there should be fines for landowners who don't eradicate invasives on their property.
My friend has a 54 acre farm and many of the plants on it are non-native and some are invasive. He works full time and then some just to run his business. If faced with the potential for costly fines for not searching all corners of his land for invasives, I know what his response would be. He would clear his land of all plants, native and non-native alike. He would just mow everything down.
It is ridiculous to think about penalizing landowners for not doing something that professional land-managers and botanists struggle for years to accomplish. If you want to regulate or prohibit the sale of invasives, that's one thing. Be careful, however, about asking too much of people or you may find you're making needless enemies and throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
__________________
BULUCANAGRIA'S FLICKR
Bulucanagria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 07:03 PM   #7
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

Around here you can get into big trouble cutting down more than a certain number (5?) of trees over a certain size without a good reason and a permit, so the baby-with-the-bathwater problem has already been headed off.

The state of Washington has been doing this for twenty years. They started with a big public awareness campaign and it's been pretty successful. The state and federal lands are subject to the same rules as private landowners.

My impression is that the laws were phased in very slowly, and mostly consists of notices from the state and possible fines.
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 07:48 PM   #8
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

Another approach to solving the landowner issue is to offer bounties to landowners who maintain healthy ecosystems on their property. A bit of carrot, a bit of stick...?
amelanchier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 08:17 PM   #9
Butterfly Educator Extraordinaire
 
bridget1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Ventnor City, New Jersey, USA
Sunrise we can hope!

My boyfriend and I have been to every garden center within a 75 mile radius from our area and we have found very few that carry any natives! If you speak with the 'average' person who gardens, they are more concerned with how the plant looks and whether insects/deer/critters will eat it.

The garden centers 'could' do the right thing, but unless someone tells them to do the right thing, I doubt they will. Maybe other states will jump on the bandwagon and follow NY's lead!
__________________
"Just living is not enough," said the butterfly, "one must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower." ~Hans Christian Anderson

http://mslenahan.edublogs.org/
bridget1964 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2010, 08:57 PM   #10
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

Unfortunately, NY isn't really leading here. New England, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and other states are far ahead of NY in dealing with these issues. This state doesn't actually prohibit a single plant, even stuff like Heracleum mantegazzianum that can, in extreme cases, cause blindness in humans. Most of us here are saying "about time!"
amelanchier is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
environmental threat, eurasian milfoil, exotic invaders, invasive animals, invasive insects, invasive plants, invasive species, invasive species control, invasive species eradication, living, non-native species, sirex wood wasps, unloved, unwanted, zebra mussels

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2