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Old 04-14-2010, 11:34 AM   #11
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I don't know about penalizing landowners for the non-native invasives on their property.
This morning I spent almost two hours pulling up garlic mustard and oriental bittersweet, and I am often close to tears when I see how much is still left, never mind the english ivy, japanese honeysuckle, pachysandra, multiflora, etc.

However, nothing is more annoying to me than walking into a nursery or big-box hardware store and seeing english ivy for sale when I've been battling it here for years without much success. That stuff really should come with a warning label!
(I hesitate to go so far as making it illegal, and I really do want to believe that when people know better, they do better. . .)
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Old 04-14-2010, 07:08 PM   #12
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Default After a 20-Year Mapping Effort, Hoping to Save Dozens of Native Plants

After a 20-Year Mapping Effort, Hoping to Save Dozens of Native Plants
By Sindya N. Bhanoo
Published: April 2, 2010

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Aims to Save Native Plants - NYTimes.com
excerpt from above:
Quote:
American colonists once watched for the spring bloom of the Nantucket shadbush, a sign that it was warm enough to bury the winter’s dead.

Today, that shadbush and dozens of other flora native to the New York region face extinction, a result of urban development and the encroachment of invasive plants from foreign lands, scientists from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden report...
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:56 PM   #13
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I totally agree it would be nice to have native plants labeled with little US flags but…. I don't think that's what was upsetting Sage. We’re all getting hung up on invasive plants when somebody is trying to sort out how come the DEC people are out to get our geese. The problem isn't just the loss of native plants to too many geese. Part of the problem is that they’re protected under the migratory bird treaty act back from the days when they were at risk of exiting stage left like the passenger pigeons did. Those days are long over but…. we’re still protecting them which…. sort of doesn’t make sense any more. Some of the problems with the Canada goose are laid out here pretty well, http://www.mycentraljersey.com/article/20100217/NEWS/100217027/Union-County-aims-to-control-Canada-Goose-population but the biggest problem since their numbers are so out of control is spelled out here, http://www.cdc.gov/Ncidod/EID/vol11no06/pdfs/04-0717.pdf. Outbreaks of illness associated with raw food products
have been increasing, in part because of increased human
consumption of fresh produce (1). However, several
sources of preharvest contamination have been identified,
including fecal material, contaminated irrigation water,
and wild fowl (1). In a previous study, 32% of the
Salmonella isolates from wild birds submitted to the
Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study were
resistant to sulfamethoxazole, and 18.1% were resistant to
both sulfamethoxazole and streptomycin (8). These findings
are likely a result of interaction of these populations
with environmental sources of enteric bacteria. In our
study, the spectrum of E. coli resistance was very different
among agricultural habitat geese, depending upon their
exposure to livestock wastes. With growing populations of
Canada Geese and associated evidence that they contribute
to microbial water contamination (5,6), we hypothesized
that observed resistance patterns might be related to the
anthropogenic land usage of the bird habitats and that
Canada Geese could serve as a vector of antimicrobial
resistance genes between sources of fecal wastes and other
environmental media. Little or no resistance was observed
among the E. coli isolates recovered from Canada Geese in
regions with no known direct contact with liquid wastes.
However, geese in direct contact with liquid swine wastes
had a significantly higher prevalence of antimicrobial
resistance. Comparing these data with those reported
recently by NARMS shows similar resistance profiles
between E. coli isolates recovered from Canada Geese in
contact with livestock wastes (Craven County) and those
recovered from both food animals and fresh fruits and
vegetables (12,13). In addition, a substantial number of
isolates from several Canada Geese that had direct contact
with lagoons containing liquid swine waste carried integrons
and their associated resistance genes.”
That’s a huge documented threat to public health and the costs of monitoring our drinking water are in the hundreds of thousands per county not to mention the costs of boil orders for water. That’s why the DEC people are out to do what ever they can to manage geese and deer numbers. Next biggie with too many geese is that they’re real hard on native vegetation…. they’re not as hard on native vegetation as mute swans but this is one of those times when too much of a good thing combined with all the mute swans that flat out destroy native vegetation means we’re stuck with even more declines in native fish, dragonfly, and amphibian populations which creates a domino effect in the higher order predators dependent on them for survival. Most amphibians need some kind of plant material for spawning. They have to anchor their egg masses to aquatic vegetation. Same thing with native fish. Most freshwater native fishes need that aquatic vegetation to breed, lay eggs, and avoid predation. And then there’s our dragonflies and damselflies. Some dragonflies lay their eggs in water filled cavities but most lay their eggs in aquatic vegetation. When we allow too many disturbances to the aquatic vegetation by letting goose numbers skyrocket beyond the carrying capacity of our land…. other species besides humans pay a high price…. with their lives. Barring millions and millions of dollars we have to blow monitoring water to safeguard public health, no vegetation for amphibians to anchor eggs to and their eggs end up floating around getting gobbled up by predators…. not good for amphibian populations already under tremendous stress from the chytrid fungus.
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:09 PM   #14
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Very well stated-
Quote:
When we allow too many disturbances to the aquatic vegetation by letting goose numbers skyrocket beyond the carrying capacity of our land…. other species besides humans pay a high price…. with their lives. Barring millions and millions of dollars we have to blow monitoring water to safeguard public health, no vegetation for amphibians to anchor eggs to and their eggs end up floating around getting gobbled up by predators…. not good for amphibian populations already under tremendous stress from the chytrid fungus.
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Old 04-21-2010, 11:21 PM   #15
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They're not talking about forcing homeowners to remove them but they are talking about charging anyone "found to have willfully introduced a dangerous invasive for the state's cost of eradicating it." That's fair. You'd think some of the plants on NY's list like English Ivy would be no-brainers but.... they're not... at least to me that one wasn't. That plant's real pretty. We had some growing up the front and one side of our old house. It was appealing and it gave the house curb appeal.... or so we thought. The bill to remove it and tuck point the brick wasn't too "pretty".... we about passed out when we started getting price quotes to fix all the mortar on our house. English Ivy is worse than acid on mortar... it eats it right out from between the bricks over the years. Here's an idea of what it does to your house only our house was a lot older and the English Ivy had been growing on it for decades so we had more damage, Brick Walls Destroyed by Water & Vines NJ Pa. More and more people know about invasives. I don't think that many realize plants like English Ivy can do in their bank accounts. It would be real nice if plants like English Ivy and Weeping Willow were sold with warnings that they can cost homeowners big money.
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environmental threat, eurasian milfoil, exotic invaders, invasive animals, invasive insects, invasive plants, invasive species, invasive species control, invasive species eradication, living, non-native species, sirex wood wasps, unloved, unwanted, zebra mussels

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