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Old 05-15-2009, 08:39 PM   #21
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They sell new for around 20k.
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Old 05-15-2009, 08:40 PM   #22
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You don't need to buy an expensive car. The Yaris is small & gets good gas milage for less than 15,000$ (if you are willing to forgo the options, you can get it for around 11,000$). The Prius and the Yaris will be worth the same when the mechanic declares them totaled, which is about the price of the tow to the junkyard! On the other hand, is someone buys a prius over a hummer, obviously given the same amount of driving one is preferable to another.

I used to ride public transportation, in the Netherlands I'd much rather use the trains/trams/bikes and it's a wonderful system. But here in the US, I just find it's too hard to get around without a car. I think there are always solutions, but with my finacnial situation I do have to consider my options carefully and for me the yaris does reduce my carbon footprint (I drive the same amount as I did before, it just uses less gas, costs less now). the prius was out of my price range.
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Old 05-15-2009, 10:17 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairiefreak View Post

For instance, I got my car for $5K. It has a big honkin' 8 cyl engine.
I got my last one for $1200 (a 1989 Honda Civic which finally gave up the ghost about six weeks ago, but I drove it for three years first, commuting 150 miles round trip daily the first year). I got 41 mpg in that thing.

My replacement is a 2001 Kia Rio which set us back $1600. Mileage thus far looks to be about 37 mpg; not as good as the Honda, but nothing newer is that good except the hybrids, which I can't afford, and it had gotten to the point that we couldn't afford to keep the older vehicle running, either.

So it is possible to have the best of both worlds -- low cost and environmental conscience. Sometimes you have to be willing to make other sacrifices -- stylish I'm not, in either car. As if I cared.

And if you do need a big truck some of the time (we have two, also older), at those prices many people can afford to have an older work truck and a fuel efficient car for commuting. Insurance is so much lower on older vehicles that you can do all of the above for much less than most car payments.

Buying used has the additional advantage of not adding the all the pollutants from the production of a new vehicle.
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Old 05-16-2009, 08:14 AM   #24
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I think that Prairiefreak has a point, one that I was alluding to in my original posts:

Conservationists must try to find a way to save the environment that allows all socioeconomic classes to participate, or risk alienating yet another segment of society. Or, perhaps more workable (but probably more work): Find the common ground where poverty and conservation intersect and have that serve as a beginning platform.

For instance, why there isn't more of an emphasis on the TAX benefits of recycling is beyond me. Once our county landfill is full, how much will it cost to find another site, purchase the property, have an impact study performed, get it up and running, etc?
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Old 05-16-2009, 08:27 AM   #25
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Clivus Multrum, Inc.
15 Union Street
Lawrence, MA 01840

800-425-4887
978-725-5591

forinfo@clivusmultrum.com

Composting Toilets and Greywater Systems by Clivus Multrum

This firm has been around forever. If you're wanting to get off the grid - the sewer grid - this is an option.

Donna in Nebraska
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Old 05-16-2009, 08:28 AM   #26
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Conservationists don't control local government. The people control local government. Recycling is provided free of charge to all residents of my community. Emphasis was placed on the cost savings to the community as a whole. All socioeconomic classes are represented in my community. All residents were provided with garbage cans and cans designated for recycling. Not all residents recycle. This is something that all socioeconomic classes could do yet don't. Many residents take the time to sort their garbage. Many don't. It is most noticeable on garbage collection days which residents do and which don't. A horse can be led to water but it can't be made to drink.
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Old 05-16-2009, 10:05 AM   #27
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Those greywater toilets look great. I don't know if they would be approved by me.

We have to pay for garbage collection. Recycling is free. Most don't bother recycling. It's too easy to throw everything into one garbage recepticle.
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Old 05-16-2009, 11:46 AM   #28
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I watched a program last night, "Liquid Assets". It featured a small town Hermine, Penn that was build over a hundred yrs ago with no sewage system. It all went into the streets and rivers.
Liquid Assets Community Education and Public Outreach
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:39 PM   #29
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Is there a re-broadcast of this? I would like to watch it.
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:40 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fearless Weeder View Post
A horse can be led to water but it can't be made to drink.


Warning:
Do not read the following comment if you are of a sensitive nature!!!


Well you can make him drink but you have to suck pretty hard on his south end.
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