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Old 02-18-2013, 08:36 PM   #21
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Oh yes, as much as I love sprouts for a bit of nutritious crunch, we have stopped buying them too.

Roger does the grocery shopping and I asked him to get the baby spinach leaves from the bulk bin instead of the bagged stuff, but how likely is it that the loose spinach is okay? And I just used some tonight on sandwiches! Sandwich filling was mashed garbanzo beans and avocado, with cut up cherry tomatoes, hard-boiled eggs, sliced green onions, spinach , and salsa verde on rye toast.
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:42 PM   #22
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I don’t have a problem with using horses not raised for meat as meat for human consumption and in pet foods as long as…. they’re healthy and it doesn’t sound like they were. Oh.... and I was ok with them being slaughtered and used to feed zoo animals too. I can honestly say I wouldn't eat 1 of my own unless I was starving to death but.... if food was scarce.... I'd let you humanely destroy and eat 1 of my horses and I could eat a horse you owned. You sure about buspar though? That’s an anxiolytic.
I would highly doubt that healthy horses are slaughtered like cattle for hamburgers, but those patties were labeled "100% beef" so there is no excuse even IF the horses were healthy. Obviously they did not want their customers to know they were eating horses. Especially ones with drugs in them that aren't human-healthy.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:05 PM   #23
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You missed post #17... I do think it should've been labeled properly. Just an FYI, American Horse Meat, "Every year over 100,000 American horses are transported to Canada and Mexico to be slaughtered and their meat shipped to Europe for human consumption. Horse meat is considered a delicacy in Europe costing around $20. per pound.

The horses from America (Canada & Mexico) that are slaughtered for food are race horses, show horses, trail horses, companions and pets. Horse meat in America is considered taboo. Horses are mostly considered pets in America thus the taboo for eating its meat." They do raise horses for meat in other parts of the world. Just not here in the US.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:07 PM   #24
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:20 PM   #25
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100,000 horses???
I did not know there was that many in the United States! That is a lot of horses.

I feel sorry for horses having to make this long trip to the south and the north.

Shipping is stressful on animals; even short distances, but long distances is really getting into inhumane and questions the wholesomeness of the food. There are beef farmers that when it comes to raising their own beef for their own family ask the butcher to come to them so as not to stress their animal.

I feel sorry for the Europeans that are consuming this meat.
It is not safe.
I wonder how much testing for parasites and other stuff takes place - after all -- The British Islands found this horse meat passing for beef full of buspar. Not only that but these horses are treated with plenty of antibiotics -pets and all that they are.

There are rules and regulations for the selling beef cattle that have been treated with antibiotic shots. There has to be a rather long period of time that passes before they can be sold.

Turttle: You are so right about those sprouts.
I bought my own seed sprout trays. It is the only way to eat the stuff like that, and I do like that kind of stuff. Esp the broccoli sprouts. I don't do it all the time - but occasionally. I put it beside my sink and run the water over it several times a day --

It is easy, it does not take too much time, and it does not have to be hot and warm. My kitchen is rather chilly in the winter and they do great.

Last edited by liquidambar; 02-19-2013 at 01:44 PM. Reason: adding on
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:51 PM   #26
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Sheesh.... it seems like we've got that many alone where I live but.... here's the actual stats, National Economic Impact of the U.S. Horse Industry | American Horse Council, "There are 9.2 million horses in the United States"!!! I'd be happy if they got em off all public lands and that includes all the rangeland out west. I don't think the general public realizes how much misery and suffering we could put an end to if we got all "wild" horses off public lands and started allowing a few slaughterhouses in the US. At least we HAD decent regulation in effect.... unlike Mexico where most end up these days.
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:35 PM   #27
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Quote:
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I'd be happy if they got em off all public lands and that includes all the rangeland out west. I don't think the general public realizes how much misery and suffering we could put an end to if we got all "wild" horses off public lands and started allowing a few slaughterhouses in the US. At least we HAD decent regulation in effect.... unlike Mexico where most end up these days.
I'm with you, Lib, 100%. I'm fine with eating horsemeat, too, so long as it's not pumped full of nasty drugs. And this is coming from someone who grew up with horses as pets/companion animals.
The Wildlife Society has info on the problems associated with feral horses and the damage they do. Interesting reading:
http://joomla.wildlife.org/documents...l_horses_1.pdf
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:57 PM   #28
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I feel bad for the horses. Horses came up here a while ago, http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...e-species.html and again here, Should cats and dogs be used as food?.
--
Eeesh…. look at this photo, Sheldon Refuge to Get Tough on Invaders. And this from the Wildlife Society which which…. I happen to agree... almost 100%, http://joomla.wildlife.org/documents...eral.Horse.pdf.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:28 PM   #29
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Camels and horses originated in North America and then both went extinct here, but not in other parts of the world that they migrated to.

So, in a way they are native- ain't they?

That is according to "National Geographics", and all the bones and footy prints back in the day - like the last great ice age or something.

Speaking of horses. I messed up big time bad. I put the horse up, but I still gave him too much pasture . SO it is down, I barely got it up and then my men (hubby and son) put up an electric fence to make the area smaller. I could have had them do that but did not-- why I have to tell them everything ????? Now I have to call the vet I guess. It will cost me 100 dollars. I could call the ferry man -- cost me 20 -- except the last time he was here he was really mad at the horse -- I kinda of figured I would not be able to get him back here.

Well the horse is not on its way to Canada or Mexico, but it still is suffering. What should I do, I know the right foot has an abscess, and probably need to be cut and drained.

Once this horse gets better - if it ever gets better -- I will never again be kind or soft hearted -- it will stay in that darn dry lot for the rest of it's life. If it throws that head up at me and charges the gate, just dying to get out, so it can have company with the cattle I am going to knock it's block off.

Would anyone want a Tenn Walker. It really is a sweet horse - not to ride, but it never kicks and never bites, even when it searches a person's pockets for treats.
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:04 PM   #30
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So, in a way they are native- ain't they?” Ummmm…. no, Jessica Marquis: Uncontrolled horses trample wild habitat. National Geographic’s just trying to ride the fence by keeping the waters muddied so we’ll either buy a subscription to their glossy publication or renew the subscription we already have…. oh…. and can you click on their donate now button the next time you visit their site? National Geographic isn’t so “national” anymore and they’re not exactly “geographic” anymore either. There was a time when their publication was actually “on topic”. It’s not and hasn’t been for a while.
--
I could have had them do that but did not-- why I have to tell them everything ?????” Ohhhhh…. slipping in a trick question are you….. As far as the horse…. I don’t think there’s too many horsie people here except me, you, and turttle and none of us are there to get a look see at what’s going on….. could be something in there that needs to be pulled or could just need more soaking but unless you’ve got the time to screw with this …. gut tells me you better bite the bullet and call the vet before you’ve got a major problem on your hands. And about that ding dong farrier who got mad at your horse the last time he was there…. maybe get a new farrier? If he doesn’t like your horse…. your horse doesn’t like him so there’s really no point having him come back out.
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Oh for sure…. I’ll take that sweetie pie TN Walker pasture pet off your hands….. just as soon as you come and take my sweetie pie Polish and Egyptian Arab pasture pets off my hands.
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