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Old 02-03-2013, 04:51 PM   #11
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This is the main page for forest reclamation Sumter National Forest.

Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests - Home

When I was there loblolly pines had been planted in the blow sand left from coal mining.

Apparently now what they are doing is removing the nonnative loblolly pines and replanting the forest areas with native plants.
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:14 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by liquidambar View Post
Dapjwy said "I bought a chestnut from a breeding program. It is supposed to be genetically ~90% the American chestnut."

Where did you get it?
What is the story behind the chestnut - more details please!
It was a rather short story. Read all about it here:

http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...ost112765.html
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As you can see - Sigh! I still did not get how to do those nice quote boxes. I am hopeless on the computer
But as you can see - I can get those cute little icons - well some of them anyway.

But there are some people on here that can get the funniest little guys ever that I don't see is offered to me down at the bottom of the box. That is okay it just make me enjoy them more.
Aww. I'm sure there is still time...you just need more time to process it, more time to explore the site, or a better explanation. . It took me awhile to get the hang of it too. It was only last year that someone here taught me about the quote icon that looks like a word bubble like you see in comic strips. Name:  image.jpg
Views: 26
Size:  1.1 KB. ...with that you first highlight the text you want quoted, then hit the icon pictured above and it will insert the code and create a quote.

As for the smiles...if you look in the upper left of the section where you got your smilie, there is this "Smiles [More]". Click on the "[More]" and it will open another window with a huge selection of smilies. The page sometimes takes a while to open...at least it does for me.
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Last edited by dapjwy; 02-03-2013 at 07:19 PM. Reason: Adding comment
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:15 PM   #13
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Don't let them fool you Hazelnut -- they are probably big enough to cut.
That southern pine is the fastest growing commercial timber ever; it was probably just ready to harvest. A little PR to go along with it.
Oh, I am horrible!
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:33 PM   #14
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Ah Dapjwy we must have posted about the same time.
Thanks for the information on the similes.
I did try --
but I will try again later this evening, and play around a bit more.

We have something like that in Somerset, Kentucky -- But I ain't seen them offering to sell me one or two yet.

How is that chestnut baby doing?
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:23 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by liquidambar View Post
Ah Dapjwy we must have posted about the same time.
Thanks for the information on the similes.
I did try --
but I will try again later this evening, and play around a bit more.

We have something like that in Somerset, Kentucky -- But I ain't seen them offering to sell me one or two yet.

How is that chestnut baby doing?
I hope when you have time you'll get the hand of it.

So far it seems to be doing okay. I was just a little wry of getting it, because I don't really know anything about them, but now I wish I bought more than just the one. I wasn't really thinking that day as it kind of took me by surprise...and they weren't on my list of what I want for the property. My only experience with chestnuts was the awful-smelling flowers of what I assume was the Chinese chestnut growing on the property my sister rented years ago. Oh well, I figured if it was predominantly the American chestnut I should give it a try. I will keep my eyes open for more...and try to go to the same plant swap next year.

By the way I have relatives in Louisville, Kentucky.

...and there is at least one member here from Kentucky, though I've not seen her post lately. Come out, come out where every you are!
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Old 02-05-2013, 02:18 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidambar View Post
Don't let them fool you Hazelnut -- they are probably big enough to cut.
That southern pine is the fastest growing commercial timber ever; it was probably just ready to harvest. A little PR to go along with it.
Oh, I am horrible!
Back about 10-15 years ago they ran studies on plots to see what was the most effective way to rid our longleaf forests of the loblolly. Because the loblolly understory is fuel rich, burning anywhere near a human population can be very risky and quickly get out of control. In those areas about the only thing we can do is cut to rid the forests of the undesirable plants, shrubs and trees. That's the science behind the cutting.

The economics I really have no idea about other than the fact that in this economic downturn funding has been cut dramatically. I lost my job with longleaf restoration in the Francis Marion NF due to the economic downturn. If the loblolly can be sold, selling it will help support these programs so they can continue and maybe one day I can walk and work once again in the longleaf restoration programs.

I can say this. The two doctors I was working under could care less about any PR, but they do care about the economics that support their programs. They care about returning this forest back to the second most diverse forest in the world...second only to a rain forests diversity. For over 30 years they have been part of numerous studies on the best ways to do this. Endangered plants such as the parnassia caroliniana and the american chaffseed have been thriving in control and test plots. A lot of good people are working hard to see this change come about and they do it because of their love for the longleaf environment. There is only 3% of the longleaf habitat remaining in the U.S. They're working to change those numbers. They seek to protect and promote native plants, plant habitats, and plant communities.
That's all they really care about.
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:37 PM   #17
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Maggy: I told you I was horrible!
I am sorry you lost your job.
I do hope that best for all those working in this area.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:55 PM   #18
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What I remember about Sumter National Forest was the poverty of the people. They were farmers who could no longer farm. Sheds with farm equipment, Empty barns no longer in use. I guess this was about 1975-1980. The loblollies at that time were not fully grown. Maybe at 15 ft or so. And the soil was barren, only those pines were growing.

I remember asking the ranger what happened here? This is coal mining land he said, the land surface that you see here is 20 ft below the original top soil. We were there to salvage archeological information--a little late since most of it had eroded away with blow sand.

Looking at coal land for very long will make you cry and ask: What have we done to the earth?

I hope SNF finds a way to restore this land. If the spirit of the people who live there has anything to do with it, Im sure they will succeed.
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Old 02-06-2013, 09:59 AM   #19
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Maggy: I told you I was horrible!
I am sorry you lost your job.
I do hope that best for all those working in this area.
LoL, yes you are but I do understand. I've grown to suspect motive in so many cases as well. These days it's so hard to find people that do things just for the good of it. More and more seem to need a reason other than good. As to a job, hopefully something will come along that I can enjoy. I worked for way too many years doing something I hate and only found out how much better life seemed to be when I was working with llp restoration.

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Looking at coal land for very long will make you cry and ask: What have we done to the earth?

I hope SNF finds a way to restore this land. If the spirit of the people who live there has anything to do with it, Im sure they will succeed.
Yanno I rarely go upstate on any of our Native Plant Society field trips and I think now I may just want to. Luckily the NPS seems to be very active in that area and I am always reading in the newsletters about projects going on up there.

When I was in the Columbus area of Ga and Ala I saw what the cotton industry has done to the land here, Providence Canyon State Outdoor Recreation Area | Georgia State Parks, as well as so many other areas of the state and I too felt like crying. Cats may be destructive to our wildlife but we humans destroy so much more than they do.....makes me wish we saw the same type of articles about our own destructive nature.
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Old 02-06-2013, 11:50 AM   #20
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And you know the early cotton farmers in Alabama were some of the most concerned about soil preservation. In the early 1800s soils along the eastern seaboard had already been badly damaged--mostly by deep plowing. Alabama farmers in the blackbelt were determined to preserve the "black gold" they had found. [The blackbelt is the old Pleistocene sea bottom]. The planters used crop rotation and cover crops to preserve the soil--there is a local newspaper where the planter gentlemen discussed "the science of soil" and shared practices of soil conservation. But with the demise of the plantation system and poverty after the civil war (sorry, "War Between the States") the tenant farms of the 1920s developed and the soil was destroyed.

In archeology so often we see in our soil columns the history of flourishing then demise. And whether man does well is always dependent upon how well he takes care of the soil.
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