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Old 03-14-2010, 08:54 AM   #21
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Your dog must have very strong teeth hazelnut! My dog always loved to eat the persimmons when they dropped. She needed a lot of walks after that!

BTW, I'm also a yankee. I went to school in Vermont and lived in Maine and New Hampshire, then Ontario, Canada before moving to Kentucky. I'm still a Red Sox fan.

Calliandra, I cheked out Danthonia spicata. Its common name is poverty oatgrass on the PLANTS database. I didn't know about it. It does sort of look like oats. Why did you choose it? Is the MO wildflower nursery near you? You are lucky if it is. My closest native plant nursery is 60 miles south of us in Tennessee. There's one in Louisville but that's even further away.

Equil - houseplants don't count either! (I can't ever keep them alive so I don't have any.) You could be up to a 10!
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Old 03-14-2010, 12:25 PM   #22
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Well thats one blessing of having a new house, we put in all the plants.
Besides the small bit of lawn and the vegetable garden, everything we have is native to Indiana. I have bought cultivars in the past, mostly shrubs but I have better luck with the specious. So now I lean that way. I try to stay with plants local to my county. I would love a woodland garden. But right now I have to be satisfied with planting shrubs and tree and sun loving plants. A woodland garden 50 years in the making.
I don't think I'm extremist, I just like natives better.
1. They're unique. Ironic, yes.
2. Better for the environment
3. I'm fascinated by the interplay of different species and life forms
4 . They're historically interesting

A real purist, IMO, would be someone who only uses plants/seeds propagated from locally growing natives. I'd like to be that pure but with my lot conditions, its not possible.
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Old 03-14-2010, 04:17 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linrose View Post
Calliandra, I cheked out Danthonia spicata. Its common name is poverty oatgrass on the PLANTS database. I didn't know about it. It does sort of look like oats. Why did you choose it?
Yes, you are right, it is poverty oatgrass. It has curly leaves that turn tan, and it stays low to the ground, so sometimes works as a lawn alternative (won't make a carpet like fescue does though). I haven't seen it come up yet so I don't know how it will look-- I broadcast two batches. One was a mix of Danthonia spicata and Coreopsis lancelota over a scrubby area that is partly shaded, the other batch was just poverty oatgrass alone broadcast over the sparse areas of my lawn. I'm hoping that patches will come up-- I'm not expecting full coverage, just interest. Here's a pic from
http://www.missouriplants.com/Grasses/Danthonia_spicata_plant.jpg:
Where do you fall on the "native plant gardener" scale?-danthonia_spicata_plant.jpg

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Originally Posted by linrose View Post
Is the MO wildflower nursery near you? You are lucky if it is.
I AM so lucky. MO Wildflower comes to a farmer's market 20 minutes from my house.

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Originally Posted by linrose View Post
My closest native plant nursery is 60 miles south of us in Tennessee. There's one in Louisville but that's even further away!
Could they ship seedlings?

MO Wildflower has sent pots to me via UPS, and they arrived in surprisingly great condition. The plants didn't seem to mind spending a couple of days in a box and they were packed with moist materials so they didn't dry out.
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Old 03-14-2010, 06:47 PM   #24
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Hmm . . . while this is just personal opinion, I would give myself a seven. I use cultivars, but only of plants that are Ohio natives. A lot of my purchases have been made of straight species from local nurseries or an Audubon center sale. If it's not native to Ohio, I won't plant it.
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Old 03-14-2010, 08:13 PM   #25
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If it's not native to Ohio, I won't plant it.
I would have thought that would be 8/9-ish... I mean, what more could you reasonably do without growing your own local seed?
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Old 03-15-2010, 02:03 AM   #26
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I'm terrible.... Or at least I can say I was terrible....For years and years I ordered everything I thought was PRETTY!
Before moving into our current home. I dug, potted, watered, built rabbit and sun protection and stored those pretties for over a month before planting them due to selling and buying lags. Through the following years I dug, flipped and smothered sod with newspapers, edged, added manures, and multiplied.

Along the way, I smartened up and started removing a lot of the shade lovers and plants that spread too readily by seed or runners. They were eventually replaced by wildflowers. Weather they are native or not, I do not know. My current beds are quite the mix.

Once we learned about the harmful effects of run off going into the bay we added an area of pea gravel and let a natural area grow up between the grass and the bay as a form of protection zone.

I once sold just about anything that needed dividing. Again, through time comes knowledge.
The baby burning bushes along with many others will no longer be available!

I was never good at guessing things in a 1 to 10 scale .....Sooooo What rate do you think I deserve? I'm sure it would be quite low, like a 4?
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Old 03-15-2010, 08:37 PM   #27
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Right, there's a long learning curve. I'm slowly moving along the curve. But I don't buy many plants. And when I am actually shopping, I don't have the USDA plants database in my pocket, so I have to rely on the seller's information (usually insufficient). On the other hand, I think looking for local genotype is impractical for the non-professional, and probably irrelevant. Plants get around... birds, wind, water. I'm content to look for local as in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey. Give me a 6.
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Old 03-15-2010, 09:23 PM   #28
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"I once sold just about anything that needed dividing. Again, through time comes knowledge.
The baby burning bushes along with many others will no longer be available!"...
you rock havalotta!!!
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Old 03-16-2010, 04:08 AM   #29
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Well, I can hardly rate very high on this test because my small backyard is dominated by 2 60+ft. Norway Spruce and the front foundation plantings are non-native yews. I also have some plants and shrubs that are native to a little further south -Calycanthus,vernal Witch Hazel, Oak leaf Hydrangea, and Fothergilla. Then there are the cultivars of plants and shrubs and the few remaining exotics.


At this point I try to buy straight species and local but even if I wanted to find the local geneotype I probably couldn't at this time.
I'd probably rate a 2 or 3.

But if you look at it another way I have taken a 98% non-native suburban property and added a good combination of wildlife and environmentally plants, removed invasives, and added many natives. This way I rate a 5.
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Old 03-17-2010, 12:05 AM   #30
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While looking up some Aldo Leopold quotes earlier today, I happened across one that made me think of this thread:
Quote:
We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive.
Aldo Leopold
For me, it's not so much about where I am, but more about where I'm going. I have removed a lot of invasives, planted a lot of natives, given presentations encouraging the use of native plants, etc.; but I really think that my most important accomplishment is a continued awareness of my impact on the environment. I don't have any illusions of achieving perfection, but I am sure that careful consideration of the consequences of my actions can make a difference.

So, looking at the rating scale here, I'd like to think I'm a 7 or 8 working towards 10.
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