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Old 07-17-2019, 12:38 PM   #1
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Default What's blooming now 2019

A continuation of this thread: What's blooming now 2018 .


My container jungle continues to grow outward and develop in its core. Most of the plants show some obvious signs of root constraint despite my efforts to punch lots of holes in the bottoms of pots and leave them undisturbed. However, the fringed yellow loosestrife is blooming luxuriantly:
What's blooming now 2019-fringed-loosestrifes.jpg


One purple-flowering raspberry bush is blooming. The others look quite large but are still not blooming and look unlikely to do so this year:
What's blooming now 2019-purple-flowering-raspberry.jpg


The swamp milkweeds germinated last year, grew tall, and hosted lots of monarch caterpillars, but did not bloom. This year, one of them is blooming a bit:
What's blooming now 2019-swamp-milkweed.jpg


And there's an itty-bitty tall meadow-rue that is blooming just a bit for the first time:
What's blooming now 2019-tall-meadow-rue-little.jpg


Some other things are now in bud and I hope to have some more pictures soon.


Most things in the garden are doing well considering the unfavorable circumstances, with the very sad exception of the Canada lilies. They germinated well this spring and I potted them up early. Despite my giving them every advantage, they all languished and gradually died for no apparent reason. Only one tiny seedling is left.


I've also had trouble germinating bloodroot, doll's eyes, and red baneberry. I expected trouble with the last two, but I recall bloodroot used to reseed pretty readily in the old Buffalo garden. Fortunately, we bought three mature bloodroots at the town plant sale this year, and at least two of the three seem to be doing well.
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Old 07-18-2019, 09:07 AM   #2
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You know Blood roots go dormant don't you? Not dead just resting... As far as baneberry and dolls eye germination . They multiply excessively in my garden all on their own If you've seeds just toss them and let them be. No need to actually tuck them under, they do their own thing. Perhaps one that needs the cold Winter months? to stimulate them into sprouting come spring
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Old 07-19-2019, 10:07 PM   #3
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Actaea are supposedly warm-cold-warm-cold for germination, and some of them have been out there for two years. Some I tried to stratify in the fridge, so that might not have gone well. They're so abundant in the wild around here, so I know they'll do well if they can just get started...


Yes, I realize bloodroot does go dormant. But one of the three went dormant pretty early I'd say. Late June.
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Old 07-24-2019, 06:57 AM   #4
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Amelanchier,

Thank you for sharing your success in container gardening with natives. I did that for many years before we had land of our own. Most things did very well for me, but, I too, lost some.

As for the bloodroot, I recall one year I collected a lot of seed from my small patch, stored it, then went to winter sow it--it was only then that I looked at the germination requirements; the seed cannot be stored--it has to be sown immediately.
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Old 07-25-2019, 07:46 AM   #5
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Yeah, a lot of those seeds that depend on ants for distribution have to be sown fresh. That's also true of the baneberries, I believe. I did sow them fresh, but I'm guessing something about the culture (not the right mycorrhizae, too much sun, not enough leaf compost, too deep a winter freeze, etc.) prevented germination.
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Old 07-26-2019, 06:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amelanchier View Post
Yeah, a lot of those seeds that depend on ants for distribution have to be sown fresh. That's also true of the baneberries, I believe. I did sow them fresh, but I'm guessing something about the culture (not the right mycorrhizae, too much sun, not enough leaf compost, too deep a winter freeze, etc.) prevented germination.
I hope you have better luck next time.

I wish I had known that the year I collected them. Maybe I will try again next spring.
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Old 08-04-2019, 09:38 AM   #7
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White turtlehead:


What's blooming now 2019-turtleheads.jpg


Wild cucumber-root:


What's blooming now 2019-echinocystis2.jpg
What's blooming now 2019-echinocystis1.jpg
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Old 08-04-2019, 12:36 PM   #8
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I have wanted to add turks cap lily to our property for a long time, but I have put it off partly because it is deer candy. However, mid-spring, a friend offered me some (and many other natives from a display garden that needs to be removed). Not the best time to move them, but I did take some. Most I cut in half so they had less to support, but I left some in hopes they would bloom.

I put them in three different spots which I hoped would deter the deer. They got two out if the three.

As I watched the third spot (tucked between the deck, a dogwood tree, and several natives that the deer never seem to touch--cupplant), at one point, I thought the deer got up onto the deck and ate it. I was disappointed, but two days later, I was thrilled to see that it had just been knocked over by the wind and rain.

Finally, it is blooming for me. Not the best photos--had it grown in place and not fell over, it would be more photogenic. (I have it tied up with a twist-tie and wild cucumber vine.)
What's blooming now 2019-20190804_115510.jpg

What's blooming now 2019-20190804_115436.jpg

What's blooming now 2019-20190804_115402.jpg
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Old 08-04-2019, 04:18 PM   #9
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Fantastic! Always liked the look of the Turk's-cap, but I don't think it's quite native to northern New England. Midwesterners get so many of the best species. :P
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Old 08-04-2019, 07:18 PM   #10
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Glad you got to see a few blossoms!
Deer are eating me out of house and home here. I am SOOOO fed up with trying to protect things. Once the fawns grow up a bit they come a scavenging. I'm almost.... to the point of, why do I even bother yet I so love the florals and keep on fighting well up to a point anyway.

Couple years ago I pulled whatever needed trimming yearly, last year the spitters and runners went, this year the duplicates went and just last week, began removing many of what the deer favor. I hate doing it but no sense in me having the things only to get ate before I see the beauty of their blossoms. Two areas of lilies were deleted and in their place, something else shall be split up and moved in to multiply hopefully not favored by the deer.
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