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-   -   What's blooming now 2019 (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/north-american-native-plants/13372-whats-blooming-now-2019-a.html)

amelanchier 07-17-2019 12:38 PM

What's blooming now 2019
 
4 Attachment(s)
A continuation of this thread: http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...ow-2018-a.html .


My container jungle continues to grow outward and develop in its core. Most of the plants show some obvious signs of root constraint despite my efforts to punch lots of holes in the bottoms of pots and leave them undisturbed. However, the fringed yellow loosestrife is blooming luxuriantly:
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One purple-flowering raspberry bush is blooming. The others look quite large but are still not blooming and look unlikely to do so this year:
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The swamp milkweeds germinated last year, grew tall, and hosted lots of monarch caterpillars, but did not bloom. This year, one of them is blooming a bit:
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And there's an itty-bitty tall meadow-rue that is blooming just a bit for the first time:
Attachment 46338


Some other things are now in bud and I hope to have some more pictures soon.


Most things in the garden are doing well considering the unfavorable circumstances, with the very sad exception of the Canada lilies. They germinated well this spring and I potted them up early. Despite my giving them every advantage, they all languished and gradually died for no apparent reason. Only one tiny seedling is left. :(


I've also had trouble germinating bloodroot, doll's eyes, and red baneberry. I expected trouble with the last two, but I recall bloodroot used to reseed pretty readily in the old Buffalo garden. Fortunately, we bought three mature bloodroots at the town plant sale this year, and at least two of the three seem to be doing well.

havalotta 07-18-2019 09:07 AM

You know Blood roots go dormant don't you? Not dead just resting... As far as baneberry and dolls eye germination . They multiply excessively in my garden all on their own If you've seeds just toss them and let them be. No need to actually tuck them under, they do their own thing. Perhaps one that needs the cold Winter months? to stimulate them into sprouting come spring

amelanchier 07-19-2019 10:07 PM

Actaea are supposedly warm-cold-warm-cold for germination, and some of them have been out there for two years. Some I tried to stratify in the fridge, so that might not have gone well. They're so abundant in the wild around here, so I know they'll do well if they can just get started...


Yes, I realize bloodroot does go dormant. :) But one of the three went dormant pretty early I'd say. Late June.

dapjwy 07-24-2019 06:57 AM

Amelanchier,

Thank you for sharing your success in container gardening with natives. I did that for many years before we had land of our own. Most things did very well for me, but, I too, lost some.

As for the bloodroot, I recall one year I collected a lot of seed from my small patch, stored it, then went to winter sow it--it was only then that I looked at the germination requirements; the seed cannot be stored--it has to be sown immediately.

amelanchier 07-25-2019 07:46 AM

Yeah, a lot of those seeds that depend on ants for distribution have to be sown fresh. That's also true of the baneberries, I believe. I did sow them fresh, but I'm guessing something about the culture (not the right mycorrhizae, too much sun, not enough leaf compost, too deep a winter freeze, etc.) prevented germination.

dapjwy 07-26-2019 06:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amelanchier (Post 161688)
Yeah, a lot of those seeds that depend on ants for distribution have to be sown fresh. That's also true of the baneberries, I believe. I did sow them fresh, but I'm guessing something about the culture (not the right mycorrhizae, too much sun, not enough leaf compost, too deep a winter freeze, etc.) prevented germination.

I hope you have better luck next time.

I wish I had known that the year I collected them. Maybe I will try again next spring.

amelanchier 08-04-2019 09:38 AM

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White turtlehead:


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Wild cucumber-root:


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dapjwy 08-04-2019 12:36 PM

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I have wanted to add turks cap lily to our property for a long time, but I have put it off partly because it is deer candy. However, mid-spring, a friend offered me some (and many other natives from a display garden that needs to be removed). Not the best time to move them, but I did take some. Most I cut in half so they had less to support, but I left some in hopes they would bloom.

I put them in three different spots which I hoped would deter the deer. They got two out if the three. :(

As I watched the third spot (tucked between the deck, a dogwood tree, and several natives that the deer never seem to touch--cupplant), at one point, I thought the deer got up onto the deck and ate it. I was disappointed, but two days later, I was thrilled to see that it had just been knocked over by the wind and rain.

Finally, it is blooming for me. Not the best photos--had it grown in place and not fell over, it would be more photogenic. :) (I have it tied up with a twist-tie and wild cucumber vine.)
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amelanchier 08-04-2019 04:18 PM

Fantastic! Always liked the look of the Turk's-cap, but I don't think it's quite native to northern New England. Midwesterners get so many of the best species. :P

havalotta 08-04-2019 07:18 PM

Glad you got to see a few blossoms!
Deer are eating me out of house and home here. I am SOOOO fed up with trying to protect things. Once the fawns grow up a bit they come a scavenging. I'm almost.... to the point of, why do I even bother yet I so love the florals and keep on fighting well up to a point anyway.

Couple years ago I pulled whatever needed trimming yearly, last year the spitters and runners went, this year the duplicates went and just last week, began removing many of what the deer favor. I hate doing it but no sense in me having the things only to get ate before I see the beauty of their blossoms. Two areas of lilies were deleted and in their place, something else shall be split up and moved in to multiply hopefully not favored by the deer.

dapjwy 08-05-2019 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amelanchier (Post 161702)
Fantastic! Always liked the look of the Turk's-cap, but I don't think it's quite native to northern New England. Midwesterners get so many of the best species. :P

I am thrilled to have it and finally see it bloom.

Yes, I just checked its range...I guess it doesnt reach up into New England. :(

dapjwy 08-05-2019 09:39 PM

Sorry you are dealing with all of that, havalotta.

havalotta 08-06-2019 07:18 AM

Thanks for feeling for me. I went online last night and researched the heck out of what I have that I could multiply in place of what I ripped out that the deer were eating. I just had to get in the right frame of mind to be able to delete some of my favorites. :farmer Things change so guess it's time I adapt...the deer sure do. That is... they KNOW where the goods lay so hahahhaha it's not going to be such easy pickings for them next year! Yard looks like heck right now with all the shifting I've done Next year'll perhaps include another changing of the guards. Time will tell.

dapjwy 08-06-2019 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havalotta (Post 161709)
Thanks for feeling for me. I went online last night and researched the heck out of what I have that I could multiply in place of what I ripped out that the deer were eating. I just had to get in the right frame of mind to be able to delete some of my favorites. :farmer Things change so guess it's time I adapt...the deer sure do. That is... they KNOW where the goods lay so hahahhaha it's not going to be such easy pickings for them next year! Yard looks like heck right now with all the shifting I've done Next year'll perhaps include another changing of the guards. Time will tell.

Good luck with that.

I know the deer will sometimes chomp on my phlox...but that just has them blooming a little later and a bit shorter. I like them shorter, so I consider that a free pruning service. :)

amelanchier 08-08-2019 01:10 PM

Is electric fencing too much of a hassle or expense for you? I don't have it, but some friends do, and it seems to be quite effective for them.

havalotta 08-08-2019 09:07 PM

I highly doubt the subdivision would allow it but it did come across my mind a time or two.
Went to camp for a 2 day rest from removing rock,s laying a brick retaining wall and pitching gravel only to come home to sticks..
Hostas, lilies all gone! I feel summer's now over. It's a bust. :squish

will-o-wisp 08-13-2019 02:33 PM

Aww havalotta, sorry you got chomped. We have plenty of deer in town because of the reservation at the top of the Orange Mountains but they don't often come all the way up to my block, too close to urban areas. What works here are 8-10 ft. fences. even in the reservation.

Funny story about the mountains, when I was little my Aunt offered to take me and my much younger sister who was in a stroller to see the Orange Mountains. So we walked for a long long time and finally got to the base of the mountains and when my Aunt said there they are and I saw green foliage covering a huge expanse rising up to the sky I just sat down on the sidewalk and cried and cried. She was shocked and tried to comfort me and ask what was the matter but I was inconsolable. Finally I told her they are not Orange!!! I expected Orange Mountains the color of a cream sickle with white snow on top as if they were right out of the game Candyland. Fortunately there was a wonderful ice cream parlor at the base of the mountain to make up for the disappointment.

I got a lovely surprise a few days ago. I heard quite a commotion in the backyard and when I looked out of one of the back windows I saw quite a gathering of birds and then I smelled a lovely sweet smell coming in through the window and there was the Summer Sweet, pink Clethra blooming for the 1st time.

havalotta 08-14-2019 12:33 PM

Oh Willo you made me laugh out loud. I remember candyland! One of my childhood games as well

dapjwy 08-14-2019 10:02 PM

Willo,

Thank you for sharing your childhood memory. At least it makes a wonderful story. :)

Rebek56 08-25-2019 09:07 AM

Oh, Havalotta, I feel your pain. When we lived in West Virginia, we had to deal with nightly visits of the local deer herd; they spent the day in a forest preserve, then tippy-toed across the golf course on the next block, then crossed the street to the Catholic school about sunset to graze their hill, then at roughly 10:00 PM came down and started working their way up our street. I sprayed a few things I did not want to lose (mostly fancy daylilies) with deer repellent (which worked as long as it went on at least every week) but eventually developed my Three Ps for Gardening Near Deer: plant only the Poisonous (like daffodils), the Prickly (which fortunately for me extended to fuzzy stems like rudbeckia hirta and most native bunchgrasses), and the Pungent (like monarda and clethra).

Good luck!

havalotta 08-29-2019 12:44 PM

Ya I'm not wanting to spray things with repellents or what ever much less weekly . A I added a couple more pieces of fencing to what I already had up. Eventually another bed will be closed in but I'm not liking the cluttered look around things. Nothing more I can do to protect what I have but to remove one bed to finish off enclosing one I can see from the home.

I like your suggestion the three P's poisonous, prickly or pungents.
You pretty much nailed it with that description as far as what deer leave alone!!!!

will-o-wisp 09-12-2019 03:07 AM

Two plants are blooming throughout the garden with abandon, the yellow flowered brown eyed susan, Rudbeckia Triloba, and purple asters and the small flowered white heath asters. All of these plants spread, seed on their own and it is more of where don't you want them then where should I add them.
I only cut the front streetside asters back once this season instead of twice so they are rather tall and glorious, full of skippers, bees and wasps. I usually have lots of light purple anise hyssop at this time but letting so many susans bloom has greatly reduced their number. The hyssop when it seeds attracts our state bird, the lovely Goldfinch so I'll have less of the finches this year.

havalotta 09-13-2019 06:57 AM

Sounds like you should remove a few of the susans to allow the others to flourish or they will take it over entirely don't you think?


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