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Old 04-16-2009, 10:20 AM   #41
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Amel, looks great! There is no need to be embarassed about the state of the yard. After all, in its starting state it was a standard suburban yard. Every change you make just improves it.

About those things that you want to chop down - don't be in such a hurry. Look for ways to use them to get your yard transitioned. In my front yard I have a Norway maple slated to be killed - but not for at least a year, because right now it is the only source of shade in an area that otherwise gets baked bone-dry in the summer heat. Although N. maples are known for sucking up all available water, in our yard, the greenest grass grows beneath the Norway, while the surrounding areas go brown. See if your unwanted plants offer any similar temporary advantages.

Cheers!
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Old 04-16-2009, 02:53 PM   #42
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You're right; replacing those things has to be a low priority, given everything else that needs doing. The spruce does provide a screen that's needed to separate us from the commercial district next door, and it may also help prevent erosion along the cement. There's neither the time nor the money to make it all perfect all at once!
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Old 04-17-2009, 10:05 PM   #43
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There's always tomorrow. They aren't going anywhere.
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Old 04-20-2009, 06:11 PM   #44
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This past weekend was a busy, busy one. I picked up 70 tree & shrub seedlings, 10 each of sugar maple, tulip-tree, black cherry, shadbush (A. canadensis), hazelnut (C. americana), American elderberry, & red-osier dogwood. I traded away roughly 20 of them and planted the other 50 or so. Most of them went on the utility land, with their permission of course. A few went in the wild garden, and several of the shrubs in the front, mostly in the hedge.

The hepatica was still going strong Saturday, and the bloodroot bloomed. Not much new germination; I think the dry conditions were responsible for that. But that is being fixed this week. Today was a complete washout, and tomorrow and Wednesday are supposed to be soggy too. I'm hoping to some serious green this weekend, when it's supposed to be sunny and in the 70s.
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My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-hepatica-macro.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-hepatica-foliage.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-bloodroot.jpg  
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Old 04-20-2009, 09:44 PM   #45
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Not only have you taken on your yard but you have also taken on the utility right of way... incredible. What exactly does the utility area look like where you are planting all these nice natives?
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Old 04-21-2009, 10:37 AM   #46
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I'm cheering for your plants, Amel!
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Old 04-21-2009, 11:29 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
Not only have you taken on your yard but you have also taken on the utility right of way... incredible. What exactly does the utility area look like where you are planting all these nice natives?
If you look at picture #5 in post #1 and picture #3 in post #2 of this thread, you'll see most of the area that I planted. There are still many thorny Rosa multiflora canes on the ground, which I'm using as free mulch for the seedlings, and to keep away vicious rabbits. Of course, my guess is that the neighbors would rather I cleared all of that away. I'm still undecided about whether to do that or not. The rabbits have already snipped the tops off some of the unprotected shrubs I planted. I tried to protect them with chicken wire, but got so frustrated with it I gave it up. (I'm swearing off chicken wire forever.) Fortunately, all the plants the rabbits got to are sprouting from the base, so they're definitely not dead.

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I'm cheering for your plants, Amel!
Thanks for your support! If the plants don't need it, I do!
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Old 04-21-2009, 06:27 PM   #48
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Maybe you should leave the rose canes a little longer if it is indeed helping keep the rabbits at bay.
Not many get the chance to do such a big project, thanks for the pictures and commentary as you go along. Your doing a great job.
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Old 04-22-2009, 12:04 AM   #49
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I hate multiflora rosa. That's an attack plant. I hope you get it all. Would you be able to invest in some tree tubes? At least until your saplings establish. They are re-usable.
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Old 04-28-2009, 08:44 AM   #50
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So this was a busy weekend. Planted a bunch of things from trades and also amended and mulched planting holes (thanks again, Lib! ). I also finally broke down and bought some Deer Off to spray on plants and keep away rabbits. I just can't afford to buy tree tubes for every seedling, I'm afraid. The main active ingredient in Deer Off is rotten eggs. Yum.

Here are some pics of things in bloom in the garden:

1. Squirrel corn, Dicentra canadensis
2. Labrador violet, Viola labradorica
3. Eastern globeflower, Trollius laxus ssp. laxus (one of the species that helps to regionalize this garden, because we are near the southwestern limit of the eastern subspecies' range)
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My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-dicentra2.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-viola-labradorica.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-trollius-laxus.jpg  
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anemone canadensis, aralia nudicaulis, arisaema triphyllum, asclepias incarnata, asclepias tuberosa, eupatorium purpureum, fieldstone, gaultheria procumbens, geranium maculatum, native flowers, native garden, native north american flowers, native plant, native plants, natural environment, niagara frontier, north american flowers, north american native plants, re-wilding project, restoration, rewilding project, sorghastrum nutans, spiraea alba latifolia, symphoricarpos albus, woodland

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