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Old 04-06-2009, 03:12 PM   #31
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What an exciting project!
Thanks! I read & enjoy your gardening blog too from time to time, saw you mention it on GW a while back.
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Old 04-06-2009, 03:40 PM   #32
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Thanks! I read & enjoy your gardening blog too from time to time, saw you mention it on GW a while back.
Really?! Wow, thanks! Chris and I keep our garden blog mostly for ourselves, so it's a surprise and a delight to bump into someone who has been there. I'm tickled pink.

Please keep us updated about your project! I can't wait to see how it grows up.
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Old 04-09-2009, 06:09 PM   #33
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I got very dirty today. My Prairie Moon order came in, and since they're bare roots, I decided not to go back into the office and finish up that article I'm supposed to submit by the end of the week, and instead do some planting. These went in the front of the house, which is supposed to be a bit more semi-formal or whatever. Mulched beds, a bit of grass still left here and there. Daffs, tulips, crocuses, hyacinths, the usual.

Well, I'm working on a hedge to go across the front of the yard, behind which will be planted some summer-blooming native wildies and sedges. To start it off, I put in a couple of Amelanchier stolonifera (you'll like one that one, Michelle ), running serviceberry. The rest of the hedge will be made up of Cornus sericea (red osier dogwood) and Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis (American elderberry).

Then I planted a few Filipendula rubra (queen of the prairie) in the back border. These front yard beds badly need summer foliage & color. Once the spring bulbs die back, it's pretty barren. This is a start; the rest will hopefully come from my winter-sown containers.

Guess I'll have to go into the office on Saturday & make up for lost time!
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Old 04-10-2009, 12:11 PM   #34
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I put in a couple of Amelanchier stolonifera (you'll like one that one, Michelle ), running serviceberry.
Ah, so YOU are the reason they were all sold out of that one! Maybe some years from now if I happen to be in your area I could drop by to see how my serviceberries are doing.

Hooray for a dirt day! I did some planting yesterday, too. And here comes the weekend!
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Old 04-11-2009, 08:45 PM   #35
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private message me your name and address. I have something to send to you.
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Old 04-11-2009, 09:17 PM   #36
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Ah, so YOU are the reason they were all sold out of that one! Maybe some years from now if I happen to be in your area I could drop by to see how my serviceberries are doing.
Drat - busted! Hey, I could always send you some seeds if you want. Seeds from those ripe, delicious berries I'll be eating this June. haha
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Old 04-15-2009, 11:48 AM   #37
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amelanchier- this is not a project this is a labor of love.
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Old 04-15-2009, 01:16 PM   #38
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Drat - busted! Hey, I could always send you some seeds if you want. Seeds from those ripe, delicious berries I'll be eating this June. haha
You're such a tease!
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Old 04-16-2009, 09:07 AM   #39
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amelanchier- this is not a project this is a labor of love.
Yes, you're absolutely right; it's certainly something I hope to keep working at, well, for a lifetime I guess... But thanks for the terminology; I'll have to use that.

"Dear, it's not an obsession; it's a labor of love!"
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Old 04-16-2009, 09:30 AM   #40
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Here are some pics from Saturday's excavations. This is my embarrassing front yard. Mostly barren, mix of aliens & natives. No invasives, but there is a Rose of Sharon that requires religious dead-heading. And a Norway spruce I really hate - so overplanted around here. One day I may accidentally chop both of them down when the wife isn't looking. Some of the natives in the front include some small hemlocks, ultimately to form a hedge on one side, interplanted with clumps of switchgrass; seedlings of summersweet, swamp white oak, and hophornbeam; a fairly decent-sized serviceberry (A. x grandiflora); and coreopsis. Those will be enhanced with things I'm winter-sowing this year.

N-E-way... I am aiming for a low hedge along the front of the yard, to be composed of running serviceberry, American elderberry, and red-osier dogwood. The second image shows a small bed I'm carving out for some WS'ed seedlings - probably a couple of New England asters in the middle with low-lying old field goldenrod, gentians, and blue flax around the border. The more lawn I can kill the better. Long-term goal: mowed path around beds, that's it.
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My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-hedge-row.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-newbed.jpg  
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anemone canadensis, aralia nudicaulis, arisaema triphyllum, asclepias incarnata, asclepias tuberosa, eupatorium purpureum, fieldstone, gaultheria procumbens, geranium maculatum, native flowers, native garden, native north american flowers, native plant, native plants, natural environment, niagara frontier, north american flowers, north american native plants, re-wilding project, restoration, rewilding project, sorghastrum nutans, spiraea alba latifolia, symphoricarpos albus, woodland

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