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Old 05-24-2009, 10:19 PM   #111
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Oh no! Wildlife Gardener's native plant poster child had a set back. Please don't get discouraged. This happens to all of us. Sometimes more than once.

Your Campanula americana seedlings are fine at my house. You will have those when you want them. Can you please share a list of the seedlings you lost with me?
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Old 05-24-2009, 10:25 PM   #112
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Direct sowing is a viable option. Less risk for the working man.

Keep up the good work. You are an inspiration to others. We are happy to have you here.
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Old 05-24-2009, 10:48 PM   #113
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Thanks for the kind words, guys, and Equil for the generous offer of plants. You know, I was really more frustrated at the loss of time & effort than anything else. I'm still pretty much a newbie at this whole thing & getting reminded of it now & then isn't necessarily a bad thing. The seeds will be easy to replace. I'll do a full inventory of what I lost tomorrow. It's quite possible I still have seeds of most of those species in my fridge. As it was, I probably didn't have room on the utility property & in the front yard for everything I had sowed. A little natural selection may not hurt those seedlings that survived!
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Old 05-24-2009, 11:27 PM   #114
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I've lost my fair share of plants. Everyone has and if they say they haven't lost any they are telling fibs. It's an ouch every time it happens. It's perfectly ok to feel the way you do. You've put more time and energy into your yard than almost everyone I know. You deserve the new title they gave you.
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Old 05-24-2009, 11:55 PM   #115
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Your seedling experience reminds me of my time in the aquaculture industry. Going through the fingerling stage can be trying. One of the sayings that was often heard in those circles was "Your not an expert until you've killed a million fingerlings."

So take heart, you're just working your way to expert.
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:41 AM   #116
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Hi Amel! I lost some seedlings this past week, too, Dang hot weather. Let's get together and mourn the dead over a beer.
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Old 05-25-2009, 09:16 AM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoloniferous View Post
Hi Amel! I lost some seedlings this past week, too, Dang hot weather. Let's get together and mourn the dead over a beer.
As good an excuse as any for a beer.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:09 AM   #118
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OK, inventory time... The species that were totally wiped out were:

  • Carex hystericina - 2nd straight year I've flunked at WS'ing this species, but I've still got a lot of Carex lupulina going strong
  • Aquilegia canadensis - I have lots of flowering plants in the wild garden, so should be easy to collect more seed; I definitely do want this for the front garden
  • Gentiana andrewsii - But I have a lot more seed in the fridge, so I'll prepare another container or two; the Gentiana flavida containers took major hits, but I think some of the tiny seedlings will survive
  • Echinacea purpurea - Not originally native to my county according to most experts, although it has naturalized here; this was intended for the front garden. Commercial seed is easy to find.
  • Clematis virginiana - I still have lots of it growing on fences, so I should be able to collect seed
  • Lespedeza capitata - not a showy species; this was intended for the rabbits. Direct-sowed a lot of it, so hopefully those will make it.
  • Chamaecrista fasciculata - lots of it is germinating in the wild garden, so not a big loss
  • Lysimachia quadrifolia - more disappointed about this one than most, because I have no more seeds, and the area where I direct-sowed it is being taken over by New England asters. Also, Prairie Moon doesn't sell bare-roots of this species, only seeds.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:16 AM   #119
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Tripple Brook Farm: Genus: L: Lysimachia
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:57 AM   #120
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Thanks for the link! I've bought from Tripple Brook before, and they have good plants.

Oh, and for the new title. *chuckle* I will do my best to live up to it.
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