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turttle 08-20-2016 05:10 PM

You know summer is ending when...
 
It is still awhile before fall color appears, but I have been noticing things around my yard that tell me, without a calendar, that summer days are coming to a close. I thought it might make a good thread. My list, so far:

1. I saw the first sulphur butterfly of the year this week.
2. There are red berries on my native honeysuckle and spice bush.
3. My beauty berries have some purple color starting.
4. This week, the number of eastern tiger swallowtails in my yard went from hundreds to dozens.
5. My milkweed seed pods are opening.
6. The only frogs still calling are the bullfrogs in my pond.
7. I have the first few acorns hitting my deck.
8. My neighbor's goldenrod is blooming. Mine isn't yet. I think it is amount of sunlight
. 9. My elderberry is rustling with birds eating the berries.
10. My bidens is up and beginning to bloom.

I find it hopeful to think that we may soon be done with temps in the 90s and major humidity. Actually, this weeks forecast is mostly high eighties, for the first time in many weeks. Fall here is beautiful, even if it portends cold temps to come.

What are your late summer events?

dapjwy 08-20-2016 08:17 PM

Great idea for a thread...and great list. :)

For years now, when my early goldenrod begins to bloom, I know summer vacation. Is dwindling.

How wonderful that you've had hundreds of eastern tiger swallowtails! Sorry the numbers are dropping, but I guess that goes with the season. I hope to start seeing larger numbers of butterflies here. My first meadow planting is two years old, my second is finishing up its first year. Each year, I plan to add more until I fill the area. Already in my small planting, I'm seeing a few butterflies visit. As my meadow, trees, bushes, and various host plants grow and fill in, I'm hoping to start seeing the numbers you describe! :)

Thanks for starting a cool thread I'm sure we will start adding to the list as things occur to us. :)

Amadeus 08-21-2016 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turttle (Post 156944)
4. This week, the number of eastern tiger swallowtails in my yard went from hundreds to dozens.

Wow. What a wonderful yard and garden yours must be! Aster and rattlesnake root are two indicators for me.

In what is really my former woodland garden, though I still visit it often, tall white lettuce or rattlesnake root (Prenanthes altissima), was an original resident. I.e. it predated me. It's a really interesting plant, one which I haven't seen mentioned on the sites I visit. (It may be one of those native plants still struggling with its status as a weed; I'm not sure.)

Tall White Lettuce (Prenanthes altissima)

It's well-suited to the shaded woodland garden. Tall, distinctive, late bloomer, popular with small pollinators. Your thread, turttle, gives me the occasion to praise this handsome indicator that summer is ending.

Rebek56 08-22-2016 05:04 AM

The asters are starting to open here, and the tulip tree is already losing its leaves.

turttle 08-22-2016 07:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amadeus (Post 156950)
Wow. What a wonderful yard and garden yours must be! Aster and rattlesnake root are two indicators for me.

In what is really my former woodland garden, though I still visit it often, tall white lettuce or rattlesnake root (Prenanthes altissima), was an original resident. I.e. it predated me. It's a really interesting plant, one which I haven't seen mentioned on the sites I visit. (It may be one of those native plants still struggling with its status as a weed; I'm not sure.)

Tall White Lettuce (Prenanthes altissima)

It's well-suited to the shaded woodland garden. Tall, distinctive, late bloomer, popular with small pollinators. Your thread, turttle, gives me the occasion to praise this handsome indicator that summer is ending.

Tall white lettuce looks like a great plant to have, but I have never seen it here. We have wild lettuce and prickly lettuce that are classed as weeds by most people, though I usually leave a couple. I am not sure if it would like my woods. My soil is hard clay with a small but growing layer of organic matter on top. White lettuce likes rich, loamy soil - most plants do! Thank you for the link on this plant. I like to learn about new plants.

turttle 08-22-2016 07:50 AM

11. I saw a black and white warbler in my yard today. They are not usually here in the summer, so I have to believe the first migrants are starting.

Rebek, my tulip trees are usually amongst the first to turn color here, due to water stress, but this year has been so wet, I am not seeing any yellow leaves yet.

Dap, the eastern tigers wer especially bountiful this year. Their host plants are trees, magnolia and tulip and a few others. They especially like silphium, sunflowers, hyssop, joe lye weed, and tithonia (which is from Mexico, and an annual that doesn't self sow for me). I am also seeing them on the pickerel weed in my pond, and my lantana.

The lack of rain may also be a sign, as our summers are wetter than any other season, and it got down to 68 last night - the first time our nighttime temps have been under 75 in weeks. It tried to rain here yesterday, but the dense line of thunderstorms past about a mile north of us. Completely unfair!

linrose 08-22-2016 02:32 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Some signs of waning summer here are early goldenrod, Ironweed and Ageratum blooming. Pokeweed berries are forming and spicebush and Carolina allspice berries are turning red.

dapjwy 08-22-2016 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turttle (Post 156955)
11. I saw a black and white warbler in my yard today. They are not usually here in the summer, so I have to believe the first migrants are starting.

Rebek, my tulip trees are usually amongst the first to turn color here, due to water stress, but this year has been so wet, I am not seeing any yellow leaves yet.

Dap, the eastern tigers wer especially bountiful this year. Their host plants are trees, magnolia and tulip and a few others. They especially like silphium, sunflowers, hyssop, joe lye weed, and tithonia (which is from Mexico, and an annual that doesn't self sow for me). I am also seeing them on the pickerel weed in my pond, and my lantana.

The lack of rain may also be a sign, as our summers are wetter than any other season, and it got down to 68 last night - the first time our nighttime temps have been under 75 in weeks. It tried to rain here yesterday, but the dense line of thunderstorms past about a mile north of us. Completely unfair!

I need to learn my warblers...and I hope to start seeing them and other species I've yet to learn.

I have a tulip tree that is starting to mature--good to know that it is one of the host plants. I plan to add another one or two in my woodlands (one on the slope between our neighborsite and us...the other will be in at the bottom of our second acre). Whatever the cause, your numbers are enviable. :)

I have cupplant and Joe Pye weed...I've also seen them come to my Monarch fistula.

We are getting a break from our recent heat and humidity--at least 2 days before the humidity is supposed to return. We've had some rain after a very long dry spell. Hopefully the weather will start cooperating with you.

dapjwy 08-22-2016 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by linrose (Post 156956)
Some signs of waning summer here are early goldenrod, Ironweed and Ageratum blooming. Pokeweed berries are forming and spicebush and Carolina allspice berries are turning red.

Your pokeweed is further along than mine...but not by that much--mine are just starting to ripen.

I was going to share some photos I took just today of my poke weed and New York ironweed, but they are on my computer, not my phone. Maybe tomorrow.

turttle 08-23-2016 11:17 AM

My pokeweed berries are already ripe, my age datum is in bud but not blooming. Still no blossoms on my goldenrod, though.

I have a native plant that is very invasive all over my yard, this year and last in late summer. It is called Hophornbeam copper leaf, and is a close cousin of Virginia copperhead that I have always had.

Dap, I don't know most of my warblers, but the black and white one is very distinctive. I also,have loads of yellow rumps, aka myrtle warblers, all winter, but they aren't here yet. I had a black throated blue warbler in late spring, but again it is very distinctive. Lots of warblers are yellow with black, and I can't tell them apart without a good photo and a field guide. Your tulip tree will seed itself quite effectively once it matures. I have to pull out seedlings all the time when they show up in less than optimal places. And I get eastern tigers on monarda, too, but forgot since mine has all gone to seed.

It is interesting that some plants mature earlier here and others later, compared to y'all's reports. I suspect it is because of our expanded growing season, and the impact of a much hotter summer this year.

Most of my swamp milkweed has been stripped by milkweed beetles, my butterfly weed by milkweed bugs, and nothing is eating my A. syriaca.

Now I need to out and figure out what is eating all the leaves off of my Cardinal flower.

Gloria 08-23-2016 02:52 PM

When the Goldfinch visiting the seed heads of our garden begin to lose distinctive color I know summer is waning. Our garden is very noisy at the end of summer as the abundant floral display of prairie type plantings draw huge numbers of insects and birds. I'm sitting here right now listening to cicada rhythms winding up and down.

dapjwy 08-23-2016 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turttle (Post 156963)

Dap, I don't know most of my warblers, but the black and white one is very distinctive. I also,have loads of yellow rumps, aka myrtle warblers, all winter, but they aren't here yet. I had a black throated blue warbler in late spring, but again it is very distinctive. Lots of warblers are yellow with black, and I can't tell them apart without a good photo and a field guide. Your tulip tree will seed itself quite effectively once it matures. I have to pull out seedlings all the time when they show up in less than optimal places. And I get eastern tigers on monarda, too, but forgot since mine has all gone to seed.

I pull out my field guide for all but the more common birds...I know a lot, but there are plenty mode that I've yet to learn.

My tulip tree has yet to bloom...perhaps next year. The funny thing is, the neighbor just a little down the road from me has an enormous, mature tulip tree that I would expect to seed all through our second acre--in 9+ years, I've yet to seek any seedlings! :( (Same goes for my own mature serviceberry.)

I know tulip trees are fast growers, but I don't want to wait for seedlings to grow up. I think I'm going to have to buy one or two--even if they are 2-3 year old seedlings.

dapjwy 08-23-2016 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gloria (Post 156964)
When the Goldfinch visiting the seed heads of our garden begin to lose distinctive color I know summer is waning. Our garden is very noisy at the end of summer as the abundant floral display of prairie type plantings draw huge numbers of insects and birds. I'm sitting here right now listening to cicada rhythms winding up and down.

That is a positive view of summer ending...I guess it is leading up to a bountiful fall and a lot of activity.

EllenW 08-24-2016 09:14 PM

All my tadpoles are gone. I have been keeping a pool of water by the barn filled all summer adding water when we had no rain. There were always tadpoles in it.

dapjwy 08-25-2016 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EllenW (Post 156967)
All my tadpoles are gone. I have been keeping a pool of water by the barn filled all summer adding water when we had no rain. There were always tadpoles in it.

Aw...that sounds so sad. Such a great experience, but sad that it is over.

I find myself realizing that I'll have to wait until next year for some things--flowers to bloom, trees to finally make berries, birds or other creatures to come back. I try to enjoy each season as it comes--and I think I do...but there are some favorites that I can't seem to wait for.

My meadow will be older and larger each year...same with the trees I've planted. Sometimes I'm fine; other times I get impatient.

EllenW 08-26-2016 06:07 PM

Yes dap, When it comes to gardening it is definitely about patience. I try to focus on successes while waiting for the smaller plants to grow

dapjwy 08-26-2016 11:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EllenW (Post 156969)
Yes dap, When it comes to gardening it is definitely about patience. I try to focus on successes while waiting for the smaller plants to grow

I try to do the same.

One of my three oldest black gum trees is really getting full and is now probably 7 feet tall or more. I want to find pictures of it from past years to show how much it really has grown. I also want to start taking a picture of me standing beside it each year. I can't wait until it blooms--not sure, but I suspect it is male...time will tell.

Too bad the other two, although they are growing fine, are a bit behind this one, so I doubt I'll have berries for a while. :(

Also, originally I planted 5 of them, only these three survived. I've added more bareroot seedling black gums...none seem to haveat taken off...and some have disappeared (overgrown areas). My latest ones are growing in a starter bed...I hope they will transplant well.

Aside from these trees, my sassafras is starting to take off...and us making berries for the first time this year.

I vacillate between frustration and exhilaration...lately, I am really starting to think that the next 2 to 3 years will really begin to show the transformation as things grow in an mature, and seed production will begin to increase exponentially, allowing me to grow more and more individuals from seed.

I've said it before that I just need a few more years, but I'm much more confident that it will happen in the next 3 years. Perhaps I should take pictures of me out in my meadow as well! :)

linrose 08-27-2016 11:20 AM

Yes, pictures please! Waiting for trees to grow is like waiting for the water to boil, only a lot longer! Happy to hear your sassafras is producing berries this year, that's good news.
We have three blackgums that we planted also, one about as big as yours and two tiny ones all from the local Arbor Day giveaway. We did put wire mesh around them so we could find them out in the tall grass of the field and to keep the deer away. Once in awhile we'll go out and whack the grasses from around the wire cages to keep the seedlings from being shaded out.

I think 10 years is a realistic period of time to see significant growth in trees, maybe less in some like tuliptree and sycamore or longer in trees like blackgum and white oak. Yellowwood was one of the first trees we planted here a dozen years ago and now it is a young adult and looking fine. On the other hand the white oak Jason transplanted from another part of the field around the same time is still only about head high.

dapjwy 08-27-2016 06:29 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by linrose (Post 156971)
Yes, pictures please! Waiting for trees to grow is like waiting for the water to boil, only a lot longer! Happy to hear your sassafras is producing berries this year, that's good news.
We have three blackgums that we planted also, one about as big as yours and two tiny ones all from the local Arbor Day giveaway. We did put wire mesh around them so we could find them out in the tall grass of the field and to keep the deer away. Once in awhile we'll go out and whack the grasses from around the wire cages to keep the seedlings from being shaded out.

I think 10 years is a realistic period of time to see significant growth in trees, maybe less in some like tuliptree and sycamore or longer in trees like blackgum and white oak. Yellowwood was one of the first trees we planted here a dozen years ago and now it is a young adult and looking fine. On the other hand the white oak Jason transplanted from another part of the field around the same time is still only about head high.

I'm thinking that after 10 years (I agree that is a reasonable time frame) they should start shooting up and filling out more each of year.

Now that I think of it, it hasn't yet been 10 years.we will *start* our 10th year here this fall, but we've only had 9 growing seasons...each year, I have tried to add more trees, so, after the first 3 years, they should start putting on growth (1st year they sleep, second they creep...)..and each year I will have something going to look at as it leaps. :)

Hmm...I'll have to take more pics...or sort through the tons I took for something showing the progress. For now, I can share the berries of my sassafras--the first year they produced! :)
Attachment 44344

Attachment 44345

EllenW 08-28-2016 10:55 AM

Now I see that I have new tadpoles in my water pool. Summer is hanging on. I thought I was finished adding water to that pool. Not yet

jack 08-28-2016 01:37 PM

THis summer has been a bust here in Mass. THe drought has many of the trees already in dormancy, and the flowers are all either undersized or non-existent. THere are strict watering bans in all of the towns and cities, so I'm fortunate that my natives are well established, though I'm sure I'll lose one or two that look so terrible with curled up brown leaves appearing to be already dead. We need rain very badly here- I never remember such a dry summer since I started gardening too many years ago...

dapjwy 08-28-2016 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EllenW (Post 156974)
Now I see that I have new tadpoles in my water pool. Summer is hanging on. I thought I was finished adding water to that pool. Not yet

~smile~

Cool.

dapjwy 08-28-2016 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jack (Post 156975)
THis summer has been a bust here in Mass. THe drought has many of the trees already in dormancy, and the flowers are all either undersized or non-existent. THere are strict watering bans in all of the towns and cities, so I'm fortunate that my natives are well established, though I'm sure I'll lose one or two that look so terrible with curled up brown leaves appearing to be already dead. We need rain very badly here- I never remember such a dry summer since I started gardening too many years ago...

I'm sorry you are going through such a severe drought, Jack.

We had an extended period with. I rain and plenty of sun and heat. I never water, but I did water all of my recent transplants, plantings, and my first year meadow germinated by seed...and those added as plugs.

You are lucky to have everything established. I basically left my established stuff to fend for themselves. We've been getting periodic rain since...sometimes quite a bit, but I did pull out the hose again yesterday for my rock garden planting in full sun. It is so unlike me to ever water this much. I guess that men's that I've put in a lot more plants (and larger sections) than I normally do. That's one more step in the right direction.

Hope you get some much needed rain, soon.

EllenW 08-29-2016 11:01 AM

I'm so sorry that you have had a drought jack. I really hate dry weather. When I was trying to establish plants here we had a drought and water restrictions. I saved rinse water from washing dishes and would put a bucket in the shower to catch some water to water plants. It was awful.

linrose 08-29-2016 04:39 PM

Wow jack, I didn't realize you guys were in such an extreme drought. Here we are on the other side of the rain spectrum with more rain than we usually get. We've seen drought years for sure and in those years we hope that our trees and shrubs will survive. I'm sure if yours are well established they will even if they take a knock back next year.

turttle 08-30-2016 12:46 PM

I saw my first yellow rumpled warbler at my feeder today! My ageratum is blooming. There was a clouded sulphur on my tithonia. And the male ruby throated hummingbirds are coming through. Their numbers have quadrupled this week, so I have to assume it is the first wave of migrants. I saw one at my tithonia, which is red but not tubular. Given the swallowtails love it, there must be a lot of nectar in those flowers.

My penstemon seeds pods are ripe and open, as are partridge peas. Hibiscus are also setting seeds. I have passion fruits galore falling off of my passiflora incarnata though it still has lots of blooms.

I can't find caterpillars on my Cardinal flower, or on all of my native viburnums which are being stripped. Snowberry clearwings cats eat viburnum as do rose hooktip moths, both of which I have, but the caterpillars are good at hiding.

I am ready for fall! These high humidity days in the nineties are getting tedious!

katjh 08-31-2016 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jack (Post 156975)
THis summer has been a bust here in Mass. THe drought has many of the trees already in dormancy, and the flowers are all either undersized or non-existent. THere are strict watering bans in all of the towns and cities, so I'm fortunate that my natives are well established, though I'm sure I'll lose one or two that look so terrible with curled up brown leaves appearing to be already dead. We need rain very badly here- I never remember such a dry summer since I started gardening too many years ago...

We went through a very dry spell in June and July. My established natives did just fine, although they did get kind of droopy. I had to water the new plantings every other day or so. Then we went on vacation for three weeks....While we were gone, it was MONSOON season here! Lots of rain and a day with tornadoes (rare here in Grand Rapids, MI). The buckets I left out to collect rain water are full to overflowing and the friend I had lined up to water potted plants and veggies never had to come do so. We've been home since Sunday evening and I haven't had to water anything yet.

katjh 08-31-2016 08:15 PM

I know fall is approaching when the goldenrod is in full bloom. I have Canada, stiff, showy and zig-zag. They are beautiful this year. The Indian grass and big bluestem are going to seed, large-leaf aster is blooming and New England aster is about to pop any day. Goldfinches are busy, busy, busy with the Echinacea seeds and the black-eyed susan seeds. The thistles have gone to seed and have their down - also keeping the goldfinches busy. Their happy chatter in the yard all day long is such a treat! There are LOTS of seed pods on the rose milkweed and a few on the younger butterfly weed. My spicebush is slowly growing, but no seeds yet. I did see a few flowers this spring! The three elderberry bushes I have were picked clean when we got home from our vacation. Birds must have been VERY busy while we were away!

jack 09-09-2016 11:30 AM

Still without any significant rain here. There are very strict water bans throughout the area, and the effects of the drought are in evidence throughout the yard. My blueberry bushes produced these dried out small berries, and many of my shrubs have dead branches scattered amongst the foliage. Last week we were to have gotten some rain from the hurricane remnant heading up the coast, but it petered out before it arrived, and we got, perhaps, a quarter inch all told from the system.

THis is definitely the driest summer in my memory...

turttle 09-09-2016 12:16 PM

Hi, Jack! I will stop complaining of my lack of water. Overall we have had a way above average summer for rainfall but it has been coming in torrents that mostly just wash away my topsoil. Hermine gave me only 3/4 of an inch here in Chapel Hill, though it did flood most of the Outer Banks. I have been dragging a hose around to anything less than two years old, and to anything really droooping, but we are in a well and have no restrictions. I remember living in Clifornia and dealing with no water. Not fun.

I have a few red leaves on my red buckeye, which always loses its leaves early. Days are still in the 90s and my goldenrod isn't blooming, though wingstem along the roads, whichu Squally blooms with the goldenrod, has been in flower several weeks. No sign of asters yet, either.

I, too, have tadpoles in my stream again, and thousands of toadlets in my yard. Many of my perennials have gone to seed, and I am in my usual quandary of wanting to scatter the seeds to have these plants in more areas of my woods, cutting back so,the later blooming plants can be seen, and also leaving the seed heads for the birds.

I have acorns falling and am needing to,sweep dead leaves off my deck, even though they haven't turned color yet. I know it is really fall when enough acorns and leaves are falling that I have to drag out my leaf netting for the pond and stream.

havalotta 09-16-2016 09:50 PM

You know summer is ending when...
The corn tassels grey
sumacs turn firey red
milkweeds release their seed
mushrooms liter the forest floor
turkeys strut about with more than likely their last batch of young
asters attract the bees
wind increases
nights cool
spiderwebs capture the dew
Queen ants fly
the scent of decay is in the air
moss is exceptionally green
grasses brown
Growth slows down
Weeds ready to spit seeds
cukes stop producing

I know when summer is ending when...A very strong urge takes over my very being to go somewhere!

dapjwy 09-16-2016 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havalotta (Post 157102)
You know summer is ending when...
The corn tassels grey
sumacs turn firey red
milkweeds release their seed
mushrooms liter the forest floor
turkeys strut about with more than likely their last batch of young
asters attract the bees
wind increases
nights cool
spiderwebs capture the dew
Queen ants fly
the scent of decay is in the air
moss is exceptionally green
grasses brown
Growth slows down
Weeds ready to spit seeds
cukes stop producing

I know when summer is ending when...A very strong urge takes over my very being to go somewhere!

Great list.

linrose 09-19-2016 03:46 PM

Nice list hava!

You are ahead of us, we still have temps in the 90s (sigh) but the goldenrods are out in full force in the field and the cicadas have stopped chirping from the trees. Dried leaves have started to fall from the tuliptrees from lack of significant rain over the past couple of weeks and the chinkapin oak by the deck is dropping little niblits of immature acorns, time to wear shoes outside again.

Jason saw a monarch yesterday, the first sighting in a long time. Spicebush swallowtails are still about and sulphurs are around a lot. I think they are the big cloudless sulphurs that are so impressive. Hummingbirds are still seeking nectar at the honeysuckle and salvia.

I usually go out and take photographs as the season changes but my mode of transportation to the outback (my riding mower) is in the shop for two weeks. I have seen many berries on the trees and shrubs and I think they will be gobbled up by the birds before I get out there. I never have berries on my winterberries to bring in for Christmas decorations as the birds beat me to them.

dapjwy 09-20-2016 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by linrose (Post 157129)

I usually go out and take photographs as the season changes but my mode of transportation to the outback (my riding mower) is in the shop for two weeks. I have seen many berries on the trees and shrubs and I think they will be gobbled up by the birds before I get out there. I never have berries on my winterberries to bring in for Christmas decorations as the birds beat me to them.

I hope you do make it out there.

It sounds like your property provides tons of berries for wildlife. Too bad that the winterberry holly never make it in as Christmas decorations, but at least they goto a good cause. I always thought they were eaten much later in the winter. So far, I only have one male, so it will be a while before I figure out if they will last as winter interest or get gobbled up early instead.

I am happy to say that, slowly but surely, more berry producers are maturing and more will be added in coming years. I'm excited about providing a succession of blooms and a succession of berries.

turttle 09-21-2016 08:08 AM

I have my first color changes going on. Scattered red leaves on black gum, red leaves on my red buckeye, yellow leaves on my painted buckeye and tulip trees. However my poor dogwood which looked like it would shed its leaves early because of the lack of rain is putting out new leaves now that we have had three inches in the past two days.

My beauty berries are weighing down their branches with fruit, my passionflower is dropping fruit, my native honeysuckles and my largest spice bush have scattered berries on them. The squirrels are going crazy in the dogwood getting the fruit.

Acorns are falling, and it must be fall because I put up my leaf netting yesterday. It is early for it, but I am going to Germany for two weeks, and it would be too late to do it when I get back.

havalotta 09-22-2016 10:14 AM

I saw a batch of interesting pods on my deck one morn. Upon looking up, I noticed they had fallen from the beech tree overhead. Not being familiar with them a search led to the fact that they are actually edible. I even found a recipe for beech nut pie however.....There's no way I'd shuck that many of those lil things to create one. I suppose if you were starving that would be a good find.

dapjwy 09-24-2016 07:39 PM

My flowering dogwoods' berries are nearly ripe (on one tree if not the others yet)...but I do have something similar going on with my silky dogwood--half of it (one or two stems are blooming again, while the other half has started showing fall colors.

So, I can relate, turttle. I'm glad that your dogwoods have survived the drought.

dapjwy 09-24-2016 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havalotta (Post 157155)
I saw a batch of interesting pods on my deck one morn. Upon looking up, I noticed they had fallen from the beech tree overhead. Not being familiar with them a search led to the fact that they are actually edible. I even found a recipe for beech nut pie however.....There's no way I'd shuck that many of those lil things to create one. I suppose if you were starving that would be a good find.

A couple of years ago, I found a beech nut on a wooded road. I recognized it, remembered that it was edible, but decided to bring it home and plant it.

linrose 10-01-2016 03:49 PM

Well we got the mower back so I'm goin' mobile again (subtle reference to The Who from 1971's album 'Who's Next') I learned to drive listening to that album, OK I'm old, so sue me!!!

The temps are down to the 60s and 70s with fog and light rain, love it! The acorns are dropping from the Chinkapin oaks, the dogwoods are bronzing and the berries are bright red. Jays are calling, always an indicator of fall.

EllenW 10-02-2016 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by linrose (Post 157200)
Well we got the mower back so I'm goin' mobile again (subtle reference to The Who from 1971's album 'Who's Next') I learned to drive listening to that album, OK I'm old, so sue me!!!

The temps are down to the 60s and 70s with fog and light rain, love it! The acorns are dropping from the Chinkapin oaks, the dogwoods are bronzing and the berries are bright red. Jays are calling, always an indicator of fall.

Yes I remember that song. The weather has turned a lot cooler here too. It was a really hot summer. My dogwoods have bright red berries also. At times I hear flocks of load jays here. Love to hear them. Not a lot of fall signs here yet. We have had several days of rain and it sounded like spring. I heard lots of frogs at night. Everything is lush and green after all the rain. The asters are blooming. That's a sign of fall.

linrose 10-02-2016 05:15 PM

Just noticed the aromatic asters have started blooming. The New England asters have been blooming for awhile now.

dapjwy 10-05-2016 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by linrose (Post 157207)
Just noticed the aromatic asters have started blooming. The New England asters have been blooming for awhile now.

I am always surprised how close we seem to be in bloom time....considering that you are so much more south than I am.

turttle 10-08-2016 02:37 PM

My male American goldfinches are molting into their winter plumage. They look pretty ragged at the moment.

We just got back from Asheville, and were impressed with the asters blooming everywhere. I don't know what species they are, other than not one I have. I collected a few seeds and am going to try them out in a pot. I have quite a different climate than the NC mountains, so it is not clear they will grow here.

dapjwy 10-11-2016 07:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turttle (Post 157238)
My male American goldfinches are molting into their winter plumage. They look pretty ragged at the moment.

We just got back from Asheville, and were impressed with the asters blooming everywhere. I don't know what species they are, other than not one I have. I collected a few seeds and am going to try them out in a pot. I have quite a different climate than the NC mountains, so it is not clear they will grow here.

I haven't seen goldfinches around since much earlier this year....however, I hope that some of my meadow planting will be attractive to them--especially the evening primrose which are starting to go to seed...supposedly one of their favorites.

turttle 10-18-2016 08:21 AM

I see the most goldfinches on Rudebeckia triloba. I have a few evening primrose but they are not where I can easily watch them. I can say that they are a favorite of Japanese beetles!

I finally put a blanket on my bed. It must be fall!

havalotta 11-11-2016 09:12 AM

Still warm here! In the 60's yesterday.....Been doing my SPRING chores now while I can hopefully getting ahead some in that respect. Replaced a gate out back on the veggie bed. Spray painted a table, topped off another bed with chopped leaves, worked some more on the project out front. Got the last strip of edging in sooo All ready to either incorporate leaves and soil OR top it off with landscaping fabric and pebbles. Kind of undecided at the moment as I'd like to play around with a strip of florals for a few years but then after that....I'd have to remove all the good soil I've added to lower it enough to top it off with the pebbles....Hmmmm

katjh 11-11-2016 09:36 PM

Wow! You've been busy, Hava! It's still warm here as well. I've been busy trying to keep up with the falling leaves in the front yard (I don't rake the back yard at all). I decided to expand the border along the front sidewalk "just a little". Well....I got crazy with the warm weather and dug up almost all of the remaining lawn in the front yard. I collected some seed from my yard and ordered some from Prairie Moon. As soon as I'm sure the leaves are about done falling and blowing in from the neighbor's yards, I will direct sow them and see what happens in the spring. I hope this works cuz it's a pretty large area to fill with plugs/plants.

havalotta 11-12-2016 08:58 AM

Having all this extra warmth at the end of the year is great!
May as well use it wisely (And I see you have) Still a lot of time left before moving on to wrapping gifts and prepping for Christmas

NEWisc 11-23-2016 12:27 PM

Winter arrived last weekend. Temperatures got back to normal and a bit of snow appeared here and there. It's time for me to start filling the bird feeders for the season. I do look forward to seeing all those excited chickadees enjoying the sunflower seeds.

katjh 11-23-2016 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWisc (Post 157452)
Winter arrived last weekend. Temperatures got back to normal and a bit of snow appeared here and there. It's time for me to start filling the bird feeders for the season. I do look forward to seeing all those excited chickadees enjoying the sunflower seeds.

I've just started filling my feeders for the winter. The jays are so excited! I'm seeing plenty of house sparrows, of course, but I'm also seeing juncos, woodpeckers, nuthatches.


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