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-   -   You know summer is ending when... (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/north-american-native-plants/13088-you-know-summer-ending-when.html)

turttle 08-20-2016 05:10 PM

You know summer is ending when...
 
It is still awhile before fall color appears, but I have been noticing things around my yard that tell me, without a calendar, that summer days are coming to a close. I thought it might make a good thread. My list, so far:

1. I saw the first sulphur butterfly of the year this week.
2. There are red berries on my native honeysuckle and spice bush.
3. My beauty berries have some purple color starting.
4. This week, the number of eastern tiger swallowtails in my yard went from hundreds to dozens.
5. My milkweed seed pods are opening.
6. The only frogs still calling are the bullfrogs in my pond.
7. I have the first few acorns hitting my deck.
8. My neighbor's goldenrod is blooming. Mine isn't yet. I think it is amount of sunlight
. 9. My elderberry is rustling with birds eating the berries.
10. My bidens is up and beginning to bloom.

I find it hopeful to think that we may soon be done with temps in the 90s and major humidity. Actually, this weeks forecast is mostly high eighties, for the first time in many weeks. Fall here is beautiful, even if it portends cold temps to come.

What are your late summer events?

dapjwy 08-20-2016 08:17 PM

Great idea for a thread...and great list. :)

For years now, when my early goldenrod begins to bloom, I know summer vacation. Is dwindling.

How wonderful that you've had hundreds of eastern tiger swallowtails! Sorry the numbers are dropping, but I guess that goes with the season. I hope to start seeing larger numbers of butterflies here. My first meadow planting is two years old, my second is finishing up its first year. Each year, I plan to add more until I fill the area. Already in my small planting, I'm seeing a few butterflies visit. As my meadow, trees, bushes, and various host plants grow and fill in, I'm hoping to start seeing the numbers you describe! :)

Thanks for starting a cool thread I'm sure we will start adding to the list as things occur to us. :)

Amadeus 08-21-2016 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turttle (Post 156944)
4. This week, the number of eastern tiger swallowtails in my yard went from hundreds to dozens.

Wow. What a wonderful yard and garden yours must be! Aster and rattlesnake root are two indicators for me.

In what is really my former woodland garden, though I still visit it often, tall white lettuce or rattlesnake root (Prenanthes altissima), was an original resident. I.e. it predated me. It's a really interesting plant, one which I haven't seen mentioned on the sites I visit. (It may be one of those native plants still struggling with its status as a weed; I'm not sure.)

Tall White Lettuce (Prenanthes altissima)

It's well-suited to the shaded woodland garden. Tall, distinctive, late bloomer, popular with small pollinators. Your thread, turttle, gives me the occasion to praise this handsome indicator that summer is ending.

Rebek56 08-22-2016 05:04 AM

The asters are starting to open here, and the tulip tree is already losing its leaves.

turttle 08-22-2016 07:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amadeus (Post 156950)
Wow. What a wonderful yard and garden yours must be! Aster and rattlesnake root are two indicators for me.

In what is really my former woodland garden, though I still visit it often, tall white lettuce or rattlesnake root (Prenanthes altissima), was an original resident. I.e. it predated me. It's a really interesting plant, one which I haven't seen mentioned on the sites I visit. (It may be one of those native plants still struggling with its status as a weed; I'm not sure.)

Tall White Lettuce (Prenanthes altissima)

It's well-suited to the shaded woodland garden. Tall, distinctive, late bloomer, popular with small pollinators. Your thread, turttle, gives me the occasion to praise this handsome indicator that summer is ending.

Tall white lettuce looks like a great plant to have, but I have never seen it here. We have wild lettuce and prickly lettuce that are classed as weeds by most people, though I usually leave a couple. I am not sure if it would like my woods. My soil is hard clay with a small but growing layer of organic matter on top. White lettuce likes rich, loamy soil - most plants do! Thank you for the link on this plant. I like to learn about new plants.

turttle 08-22-2016 07:50 AM

11. I saw a black and white warbler in my yard today. They are not usually here in the summer, so I have to believe the first migrants are starting.

Rebek, my tulip trees are usually amongst the first to turn color here, due to water stress, but this year has been so wet, I am not seeing any yellow leaves yet.

Dap, the eastern tigers wer especially bountiful this year. Their host plants are trees, magnolia and tulip and a few others. They especially like silphium, sunflowers, hyssop, joe lye weed, and tithonia (which is from Mexico, and an annual that doesn't self sow for me). I am also seeing them on the pickerel weed in my pond, and my lantana.

The lack of rain may also be a sign, as our summers are wetter than any other season, and it got down to 68 last night - the first time our nighttime temps have been under 75 in weeks. It tried to rain here yesterday, but the dense line of thunderstorms past about a mile north of us. Completely unfair!

linrose 08-22-2016 02:32 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Some signs of waning summer here are early goldenrod, Ironweed and Ageratum blooming. Pokeweed berries are forming and spicebush and Carolina allspice berries are turning red.

dapjwy 08-22-2016 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turttle (Post 156955)
11. I saw a black and white warbler in my yard today. They are not usually here in the summer, so I have to believe the first migrants are starting.

Rebek, my tulip trees are usually amongst the first to turn color here, due to water stress, but this year has been so wet, I am not seeing any yellow leaves yet.

Dap, the eastern tigers wer especially bountiful this year. Their host plants are trees, magnolia and tulip and a few others. They especially like silphium, sunflowers, hyssop, joe lye weed, and tithonia (which is from Mexico, and an annual that doesn't self sow for me). I am also seeing them on the pickerel weed in my pond, and my lantana.

The lack of rain may also be a sign, as our summers are wetter than any other season, and it got down to 68 last night - the first time our nighttime temps have been under 75 in weeks. It tried to rain here yesterday, but the dense line of thunderstorms past about a mile north of us. Completely unfair!

I need to learn my warblers...and I hope to start seeing them and other species I've yet to learn.

I have a tulip tree that is starting to mature--good to know that it is one of the host plants. I plan to add another one or two in my woodlands (one on the slope between our neighborsite and us...the other will be in at the bottom of our second acre). Whatever the cause, your numbers are enviable. :)

I have cupplant and Joe Pye weed...I've also seen them come to my Monarch fistula.

We are getting a break from our recent heat and humidity--at least 2 days before the humidity is supposed to return. We've had some rain after a very long dry spell. Hopefully the weather will start cooperating with you.

dapjwy 08-22-2016 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by linrose (Post 156956)
Some signs of waning summer here are early goldenrod, Ironweed and Ageratum blooming. Pokeweed berries are forming and spicebush and Carolina allspice berries are turning red.

Your pokeweed is further along than mine...but not by that much--mine are just starting to ripen.

I was going to share some photos I took just today of my poke weed and New York ironweed, but they are on my computer, not my phone. Maybe tomorrow.

turttle 08-23-2016 11:17 AM

My pokeweed berries are already ripe, my age datum is in bud but not blooming. Still no blossoms on my goldenrod, though.

I have a native plant that is very invasive all over my yard, this year and last in late summer. It is called Hophornbeam copper leaf, and is a close cousin of Virginia copperhead that I have always had.

Dap, I don't know most of my warblers, but the black and white one is very distinctive. I also,have loads of yellow rumps, aka myrtle warblers, all winter, but they aren't here yet. I had a black throated blue warbler in late spring, but again it is very distinctive. Lots of warblers are yellow with black, and I can't tell them apart without a good photo and a field guide. Your tulip tree will seed itself quite effectively once it matures. I have to pull out seedlings all the time when they show up in less than optimal places. And I get eastern tigers on monarda, too, but forgot since mine has all gone to seed.

It is interesting that some plants mature earlier here and others later, compared to y'all's reports. I suspect it is because of our expanded growing season, and the impact of a much hotter summer this year.

Most of my swamp milkweed has been stripped by milkweed beetles, my butterfly weed by milkweed bugs, and nothing is eating my A. syriaca.

Now I need to out and figure out what is eating all the leaves off of my Cardinal flower.


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