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Old 10-24-2013, 05:10 PM   #1
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Default Great blue lobelia brings beneficial polllinator

September native plant: Great blue lobelia brings beneficial polllinator
Daily Press
7:27 a.m. EDT, October 4, 2013

September native plant: Great blue lobelia brings beneficial polllinator - dailypress.com
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Great blue lobelia, or Lobelia siphilitica is a lovely plant in late fall, when plants with yellow flowers are usually prominent, according to Helen Hamilton, past president of the John Clayton, Virginia Native Plant Society, in southeastern Virginia.

Tall spikes of brilliant true-blue flowers grow on a stiff, unbranched, leafy stalk, 1-3 feet high. Flowers of this genusall have 2 narrow lobes or “ears” above, with 3 wider lobes forming a lip below. The 1-inch long violet-blue flowers of Great Blue Lobelia are striped with white on the 3 lower lobes, which appear more prominent than the lobes above. Leaves are alternate on the stem, finely toothed and pointed.

Great Blue Lobelia is a wetland native species, requiring…
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:24 PM   #2
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I had one come in as a stowaway in a pot of another native I purchased. Later, I got seeds from loris of this and L. cardinalis--my favorite Lobelia.

The blue one was never my favorite, but being native I plan to include it...I figure it will look good en masse. After reading this, I think I'm going to appreciate it more...not only for the pollinators (which is why I'm including it), but also for the blue to contrast the golds we usually see that time of year.
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Old 10-24-2013, 08:24 PM   #3
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I would love to have this plant. Blue is my favorite color. It goes to the top of my wish list!
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Old 10-24-2013, 08:26 PM   #4
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I know there are few blue flowered natives that I can think of. I'm not against the plant, I just REALLY love the cardinal flower.
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Old 10-24-2013, 08:35 PM   #5
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I planted a cardinal flower 2 years ago. It finally bloomed this year. It is very beautiful but I hear it does not spread and it is short lived. I hope I find out otherwise.
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Old 10-29-2013, 07:26 PM   #6
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I planted a cardinal flower 2 years ago. It finally bloomed this year. It is very beautiful but I hear it does not spread and it is short lived. I hope I find out otherwise.
I'm glad it bloomed for you.

I'm no expert on cardinal flower, but I'd guess that, if it list growing in the right site, it will reseed itself. I remember seeing a healthy stand of it at Moraine State park (Western PA) in a wet area stream side. I'd love to have a stand like that established here...or a few stands.

I hope you can get a nice stand established too.
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Old 10-31-2013, 10:06 AM   #7
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This plant is tougher than I thought. It's survived in a less than ideal spot in the garden with no additional water. It's always a surprise to see that blue in late summer. I first saw cardinal flowers in the wild in New York in the ADKs. That was a memorable find. That one and a huge colony of showy ladies' slippers in Vermont really stand out in my mind as "OH WOW!" moments.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:53 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by linrose View Post
This plant is tougher than I thought. It's survived in a less than ideal spot in the garden with no additional water. It's always a surprise to see that blue in late summer. I first saw cardinal flowers in the wild in New York in the ADKs. That was a memorable find. That one and a huge colony of showy ladies' slippers in Vermont really stand out in my mind as "OH WOW!" moments.
They both sound worthy of "Oh WOW!".

I expect to have quite a lot of blue lobelia blooming next year...I planted a ton of seed (from loris)...but I need to transplant them to get them established and ready to bloom. Hopefully, I'll learn to like them more in the years to come.

What I really want to see is a colony of the cardinal flowers established here...I wish I had a wetland habitat ready for them.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:24 PM   #9
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Now dap you need to appreciate your blue lobelia. I really wish I had some.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:34 PM   #10
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Now dap you need to appreciate your blue lobelia. I really wish I had some.
I think, when I have more than one specimen, I will. ...and watching the wildlife attracted to it will help a lot, I'm sure.

My seed is from New Jersey...a bit farther away than I'd like, but still pretty close to me. How determined are you to keep things local?
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