Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > General Gardening Boards > North American Native Plants > North American Native Plant Propagation and Winter Sowing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-15-2010, 03:26 AM   #1
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
PlantInPot What's happening with your propagating this summer?

Is anyone propagating plants this summer?

I haven't done any cuttings this year. My backyard is kind of a wreck from removing the old concrete patio and starting to replace it with brick, and it's tiny, so there's no room for any propagating this year with the pallettes of bricks and the piles of sand and gravel to arrive. But I have lots of potting and repotting of seedlings to do yet.

Last fall there were two 10x20" trays of Aronia seedlings in 2 1/2" pots 4" deep. I managed to get one trays worth into gallon pots before winter, and they're almost four feet tall. But the tray that I neglected to repot into larger pots... well, I tried to move it today, and it was stuck firmly to the ground. Oops...

Blurry pictures, but you get the idea:

What's happening with your propagating this summer?-dsc06815.jpg

What's happening with your propagating this summer?-dsc06816.jpg

What's happening with your propagating this summer?-dsc06817.jpg

From time to time, I pick up the gallon-sized pots, just to keep this sort of thing from happening, but I guess I forgot this tray. I poured a bucket of water around the tray on the ground to loosen it so it could be lifted without tearing most of the roots, which seemed to work.

I guess this is what landscape fabric is used to prevent. A bed just for seedlings would be good, but then I'd have to weed it, although the pots get plenty of weeds too.
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 08:43 AM   #2
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

Heh, heh... Yeah, it can be hard to keep up w/ that stuff. I still have some things I haven't planted out. There's some hop sedge I've kept transplanting into larger and larger containers; it's now basically full size, but I don't want to transplant in mid-summer. Also some purple sneezeweed, cream gentian, Culver's root, & northern dropseed. Then I've got some containers that never germinated: bottle gentian and fringed gentian. I can't understand why not a single seedling germinated. Gentians are really starting to get on my nerves. But hope springs eternal - I keep watering them.
__________________
"I take the part of the trees as against all their enemies." -J.R.R. Tolkien
amelanchier is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 09:05 AM   #3
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

For twelve years or more, I kept all of my plants in pots--inluding young trees. Every couple of years I'd have to pull them out of the pots, trim the roots, trim and equal amount of the tops, then put them back into the same pots. I still have a few that need planted in the ground, but I've not found a place for them yet. Several times when transplanting them, I've had to cut the pot away to prevent breaking large root.

I'm glad you got them out of the ground with so many long roots attached. If you can't extricate them from the pot without too much damage, then I'd go the "cut the pot" route.

Late winter this year, I finally planted a lot of wildflower seeds I'd collected from my yard. I planted them all in plastic window boxes that the previous owner had. The seeds were not labeled and they were mixed together, only roughly grouped together. Most of them are still in that same container. I have planted some in the ground, moved several more into larger pots where I planted some full grown milkweed that I rescued from a friend's garden--fated to become compost.

I just planted those milkweed in the yard along with the seedlings that have had more room to grow, yesterday. So, I've been planning on repotting or planting the rest--or at least more of them...every time I take some out, the rest have more room.
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 01:55 PM   #4
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

Definitely going to have to cut these pots - I was lucky to get them out of the tray without cutting it!

Amelanchier, the weather is why lots of the winter-sown seedlings haven't been planted. It's been bone-dry and hot this summer and I would have had to water each plant twice a day just to keep them alive. I just hope they can get big enough to make it through next winter if I plant them this fall. I'm mostly concerned about planting the native phlox and showy goldenrods.

I did plant out some poke milkweed seedlings a couple weeks ago, and have been going around everyday and make sure they have enough water.
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 02:00 PM   #5
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

I still have 4 prairie dropseed in gal. pots. Last time I started the seed and transplanted right away but while small the rabbits kept eating all new growth to the ground. So this time I have allowed to grow in pots all summer,as the rabbits do not bother the older growth they can be planted soon. Looks like there will be much more seed to plant for next year from the older clumps. I like the idea of sharing native prairie grass, but most people don't want to start the seeds.

Still need to fiqure out how to over winter the lobelia cardinalis.Sitting in an inch of water has worked this summer but it may need drier feet for the winter.
Do you think I should bury the pots?
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 02:19 PM   #6
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

That, or better yet, try to get the plants in the ground this fall. They grow here without a whole lot of water, except the few that are in full sun.

The hummingbirds have been feeding from the Lobelias for a couple weeks now, but I'll be lucky to get a picture.
Attached Thumbnails
What's happening with your propagating this summer?-dsc06793.jpg  
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 03:55 PM   #7
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Default

Quote:
Still need to fiqure out how to over winter the lobelia cardinalis.Sitting in an inch of water has worked this summer but it may need drier feet for the winter.
Do you think I should bury the pots?
Lobelia cardinalis has some unusual characteristics that require a little different culture than most plants. From Wildflowers: A Guide to Growing and Propagating Native Flowers of North America by William Cullina:
"Lobelias are not true perennials, because the flowering stem and its associated roots die after setting seed. They are perennial in effect only because new offsets grow from the axils of the lower most leaves and quickly put down their own abundant white roots. It is especially important, then, that these new offsets be coddled a little in the fall. Think of them as seedlings that must be kept free of debris and competition so that they will have a chance to establish roots before winter. With a little attention, the plants will come back indefinitely. They form low rosettes that remain semievergreen over the winter and begin to bolt in the spring, sprouting leafy stems that yield to dense spikes ... " Also, if you are working with plants grown from seed this spring " ... the tiny rosettes can be transferred when as big as a penny (dilute liquid fertilizer speeds them up immensely). They will often try to bloom the first fall, but is better to clip these spikes off to encourage rosettes to form."

A common mistake that I often see is mulching Lobelia cardinalis. Mulching can smother the rosette. They are hardy to zone 3, so there is no need to mulch. They will do well in ordinary garden conditions as long as they are kept moist, they can't tolerate completely drying out. They can tolerate short periods of flooding. Although they can be grown in ordinary garden conditions, they really need a continuously moist location in order to reseed themselves.

I think they are a fantastic plant, there's just no other red like them. My hummingbirds actually become territorial and chase other hummers away from "their" cardinal flowers.

Amazon.com: Wildflowers: A Guide to Growing and Propagating Native Flowers of North America (The New England Wild Flower Society) (0046442966092): William Cullina: Books
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 11:29 PM   #8
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

My lobelia cardinalis is in the bog area of my pond, with wet feet all year. I am in Chapel Hill, zone 7b, not nearly as cold as you, but we had a hard freeze for twelve days this winter where it didn't get above freezing.

These plants overwinter in place, planted so that the soil is fully saturated with water up to the base of the stem, and with no special coddling, come back in the spring, for two years now. (I believe in the sink or swim method of gardening, if you need coddling, you don't survive in my garden). I don't know if you could get away with being this cavalier with lobelia in Illinois, but it works here in NC. Good luck.
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 11:57 AM   #9
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Default

Bump for lobelia cardinalis info.
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 05:35 PM   #10
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

I got all excited thinking that swamp thing posted a new thread. I miss him.

I propagated a lot more species from seed this year than pat years, but I still have a lot left to put in the ground. I'm not sure if I even got 10% of them planted last month. Time is running out.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
happening, navtive plants, over winter, plant, plants, plants in pots, potted plants, propagate, propagating, propagation, seedling, seedlings, summer, transplant, winter sowing, winter sown

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2