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Old 11-06-2013, 06:11 PM   #11
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I'm back. Thanks for linking to this post.

My seedlings didn't try to bloom this first year, so at least I don't have to worry about that part...I hope that I I can get them through the winter. I wish I had a naturally wet spot for them--hey, I do! Right on the edge of the property line! I'll put some there, some elsewhere, and hopefully create a wetland area with a liner so that I can grow more nearer the house.
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:35 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I got all excited thinking that swamp thing posted a new thread. I miss him.
Oops - I probably should have mentioned that this was an older thread.

On the lobelia, you could always put a few plants in a pot in your water feature's pond. Those plants would ensure that you have seed each year to sow in potential self-supporting areas.
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Old 11-07-2013, 05:13 PM   #13
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Oops - I probably should have mentioned that this was an older thread.
I do that all of the time when I see the original poster's name...but, because there were so few replies, I really thought it was a newer thread. I hadn't even seen your link to it until later.

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On the lobelia, you could always put a few plants in a pot in your water feature's pond. Those plants would ensure that you have seed each year to sow in potential self-supporting areas.
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll have to try it.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:21 AM   #14
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"Lobelias are not true perennials, because the flowering stem and its associated roots die after setting seed. They are perennial in effect only because new offsets grow from the axils of the lower most leaves and quickly put down their own abundant white roots. It is especially important, then, that these new offsets be coddled a little in the fall. Think of them as seedlings that must be kept free of debris and competition so that they will have a chance to establish roots before winter. With a little attention, the plants will come back indefinitely. They form low rosettes that remain semi evergreen over the winter and begin to bolt in the spring, sprouting leafy stems that yield to dense spikes ...
Guess I had missed the info about the cardinal flowers the first time around so it's nice the thread was bumped up!

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I got all excited thinking that swamp thing posted a new thread. I miss him.
last time he was on and posting was in 2010!
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:50 PM   #15
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I have successfully propagated L. cardinalis by taking the cut seed heads and scattering them where I would like to have Lobelia. I now have plants in a bunch of places I didn't before, including places that are not nearly as moist as it claims it needs. If you need to cut back the seed stalks anyway (I do, for my leaf netting), put them where you would like more plants and wait and see. If it works, great! It cost you no work. If it doesn't work, oh well, it cost you nothing to try. That is often my method of propagating - it has a low yield, but low effort, which living with hard pan clay and rock, with arthritis that makes digging a problem is the way to go.

On a positive note, I have common milkweed in my garden now from cuttings that I dipped in rooting compound (NAPA?) and rooted in a cup of sand for two weeks then stuck in the dirt. I thought it had died last year two weeks after I stuck it in the ground but it came up gang busters this year. I have multiple elderberry plants from just chopping off side branches and sticking the ends into the dirt up to two axils worth (no pots, just put them where I wanted them). My Arbor Day seedlings I just put straight into the ground with about a 50% success rate and I don't have to dig bigger holes or worry about them rooting out of the bottom of their pots.

My daughter is going to do a project with the propagation specialist at the NC botanical garden; she is very interested in genetics and he wants to breed Carolina blue varieties of several different wildflowers so she is going to help him get started. Maybe she will come home happy to work in my garden!
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:07 PM   #16
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last time he was on and posting was in 2010!
It is hard to believe that I'll have been a member for 4 years pretty soon. 2010 doesn't seem all that long ago, but then I realize 2014 is right around the corner.
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