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Old 01-13-2010, 08:24 AM   #1
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Default Tips for Asclepias?

I'm thinking of putting seed for A. sullivantii (I think) and A. syriaca right onto the ground (after it is lightly tilled) under the mulch.

Last winter I sowed seed for A. incarnata indoors and it went nuts as long as I kept it wet. But these other two species are not wetland plants so I thought to put them straight onto the ground.

Thoughts? I do not have much experience growing from seed outside of incarnata.
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Old 01-13-2010, 08:36 AM   #2
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Tim,
Both species require at least 60 days of stratification (either sown in the ground in late Fall or placed in a ziplock bag with moist medium the first part of January. After stratifying the seeds, sow them in a tray filled with good potting soil and lightly cover the seeds. Germination should occur about two weeks later. Let the seedlings grow until they have sufficient root development to withstand transplanting. I sow all of my Asclepias species in an outdoor seed frame. I leave one-half of the seedlings in it for a full year so that the root develops fully. The second year they can be removed and transplanted to your garden. Take a look at my article "Milkweeds" in the forum section.
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Old 01-13-2010, 09:21 AM   #3
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So you're saying that I should get both into ziplocks and then into the fridge for two months?

From there I can sow them . . . okay, I'll try that. Thanks for the advice.
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Old 01-13-2010, 09:57 AM   #4
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TimSaupe - Here's a thread on the seed treatment that Porterbrook is talking about:
Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment
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Old 01-13-2010, 11:19 AM   #5
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The fridge or use winter sowing method where covered contained is placed outside to experience cold moist stratification.
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Old 01-15-2010, 12:10 PM   #6
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Broadcasting the seed directly into the area in which you would like them to grow may be another extremely viable option.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:30 PM   #7
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Default Seed storage before stratification?

I just collected some A. incarnata and my question is how to store the seed before I stratify it? I don't want to put it into moist medium now do I? I was thinking I would just leave it in and envelope in a cool dark place until I'm ready to put it into stratification this winter. Am I on the right track?
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:34 PM   #8
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Yes, cool and dark would be good until you are ready for stratification. I dry them after collecting by spreading the seeds out on a paper plate and placing it on top of the refrigerator for several days. This drying will help avoid problems with mold, etc. Then I put them in envelopes and place the envelopes in a container that is varmint proof.

p.s.: You've already collected your seed, but for others that have yet to collect the seeds it is important to wait until the seeds are mature before collecting them. The seeds should be brown before collecting.
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Last edited by NEWisc; 08-29-2013 at 05:51 PM. Reason: added note
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:51 PM   #9
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Thanks NEWsic I'll dry them first before I put them away. Is the varmint proof container you use ventilated or airtight?
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Old 08-29-2013, 06:56 PM   #10
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If the seeds are properly dried before storage I think either way could work. If the location of the container is a moist environment though (like some basements) ventilated could develop moisture problems. A dry storage area would work with either type of container.

An old file cabinet has worked well for me. I place the envelopes neatly in shoe boxes that are just the right size to hold the envelopes in an orderly fashion. I've also used wooden boxes when they are in a place that I view on a regular basis so that I will notice if any varmint is working on getting into the box.

I think you could find a suitable storage container for your purposes for very little cost at a goodwill or similar store.
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