Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > General Gardening Boards > North American Native Plants > North American Native Plant Propagation and Winter Sowing

Reply
 
LinkBack (3) Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-20-2015, 10:15 AM   #61
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

disuhan
Have you ever tried sprouting seeds in the coconut coir before????
I ask because I had planted a variety of seeds into it last year and hardly ANYTHING sprouted. What did...... STAYED runted throughout the entire summer! I ended up purchasing tomato plants etc because most if not all of my plants never ever went on to amount to much of anything much less produce!

Has anyone ever had any sprouting and-or growing success using the coconut coir???
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 07:49 PM   #62
Heron
 
kchd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: c. Mississippi
Default

Hava, I have used coconut coir with success for germination, but after the 2nd true leaves form on your seedlings, you need to either transplant to more fertile potting mix or start fertilizing when you water them.
__________________
"That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics."
Aldo Leopold
kchd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 08:47 AM   #63
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Thought I'd try it, but if it doesn't have much in it to keep things growing, guess I'll stick with the ole tried and true sterilized mix I've been using all these years as it saves both time and money by not having to purchase more soil and not needing to transplant. Thanks Kchd
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 12:21 AM   #64
Grub
 
disuhan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Burlington, VT
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
disuhan
Have you ever tried sprouting seeds in the coconut coir before????
I ask because I had planted a variety of seeds into it last year and hardly ANYTHING sprouted. What did...... STAYED runted throughout the entire summer! I ended up purchasing tomato plants etc because most if not all of my plants never ever went on to amount to much of anything much less produce!

Has anyone ever had any sprouting and-or growing success using the coconut coir???
I tried it for the first time last year and I had issues, not with the sprouting, but I didn't have the ability to transplant them fast enough and yes they all died. But I thought it was just because I let them dry out too often and I didn't pay them enough attention. I will be more diligent this year.
disuhan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 12:24 PM   #65
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Dapjwy was talking about trying it last year or so and I actually thought about bringing him a bag or two when we had gone to visit him but hmmmmmm with the stuff Equill and I had already gathered and packed for the visits there wasn't any more room to bring bags of coir to him.

Dapajwy Did you ever get around to giving it a try and if so did it go on into producing any sort of decent sprouts or plants..... or not?
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 02:19 PM   #66
Heron
 
kchd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: c. Mississippi
Default

Coconut coir is extremely low in nutrients. That's why your seedlings will not grow well unless you fertilize them (if left growing in the coir) or transplant them into a better soil/mix for growth. If you don't want to transplant them, mix up some fertilizer in water and give it to your seedlings weekly.
__________________
"That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics."
Aldo Leopold
kchd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 05:12 PM   #67
Lungwort
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Livonia, MI
Default

Started my Prairie Moon Nursery large & small seed prairie mix and my purple pale coneflower seeds on a 90 day cold-moist stratification today. I have quite a bit more seed to stratify at the 60 and 30 day marks before the last hard frost here in SE Michigan.

Counting down to Spring!!!!
rhauser44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 06:33 PM   #68
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Dapjwy was talking about trying it last year or so and I actually thought about bringing him a bag or two when we had gone to visit him but hmmmmmm with the stuff Equill and I had already gathered and packed for the visits there wasn't any more room to bring bags of coir to him.

Dapajwy Did you ever get around to giving it a try and if so did it go on into producing any sort of decent sprouts or plants..... or not?
I forgot all about it after hearing about it here. I've never tried it. I'm still using ProMix...with great success.

Thanks for thinking of me, havalotta.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 06:36 PM   #69
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhauser44 View Post
Started my Prairie Moon Nursery large & small seed prairie mix and my purple pale coneflower seeds on a 90 day cold-moist stratification today. I have quite a bit more seed to stratify at the 60 and 30 day marks before the last hard frost here in SE Michigan.

Counting down to Spring!!!!
Great news, rhauser!

Keep us posted...and good luck.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cold, cold period, germinate, germination, important, moist, native flowers, native plants, natives, planting, plants, propagate, propagation, seed, seeding, seedlings, stratification, treatment, wild ones, wildflowers, winter sowing

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


LinkBacks (?)
LinkBack to this Thread: http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/north-american-native-plant-propagation-winter-sowing/406-cold-moist-stratification-important-seed-treatment.html
Posted By For Type Date
Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment - Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening This thread Refback 05-06-2015 02:19 AM
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin This thread Refback 11-19-2014 06:59 AM
Ask Mr. Smarty Plants This thread Refback 12-13-2013 10:11 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2