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Old 02-09-2015, 01:16 PM   #41
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So, NEWisc, what I'm doing isn't even considered moist stratification, is it?
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Old 02-09-2015, 07:23 PM   #42
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So, NEWisc, what I'm doing isn't even considered moist stratification, is it?
Well what you are doing works dap.
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Old 02-09-2015, 08:21 PM   #43
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My notes say I did my first winter sowing on 11-23. I used reclaimed garden center pots (the 2" ones, mostly) and potting soil. I think I posted this list on another thread somewhere, but here it is again: Big-Leaved Aster, Heart-Leaved Aster, Pasque Flower, Pasture Thistle, Poke Milkweed, Purpletop, Rose Milkweed, Slender Gerardia, Tall Bellflower, Whorled Milkweed, Dutchman's Breeches (some direct-sown into woodland garden area, some in pots), Blue Cohosh, Pennsylvania Sedge.

I ended up with 90-some pots total. Hopefully, I will have some success! They are all in a sheltered area, with a piece of window screen over them to keep the squirrels out. They are now covered with snow as well.
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Old 02-10-2015, 02:10 AM   #44
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...
I guess, over the past few years, I've just sowed the seeds, covered them with snow and let the spring's freezing and thawing do the rest--maybe I don't understand the method as much as I thought. I can't imagine, in nature, the seeds getting the ideal temperatures for that long of a time (but, perhaps with cold stratification, we are not mimicking nature, but trying to provide the highest germination rate).
...
Your winter sowed seeds are getting the benefits of cold-moist stratification, you're just doing it in a more natural way, closer to the way mother nature would do it.

Doing it in the refrigerator is more gardener like and allows for a more controlled process with potentially more plants. Seeds are not lost to critters, unsuitable temperature or moisture levels, etc. Ordinarily I'm more in favor of the natural process, but I can't help but feel that we humans have a lot of catching up to do with respect to repairing the damage that has been done to our natural ecosystems. Did I mention that I am sometimes impatient ... ?

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Being more of a lazy gardener*, not only did I not really research stratification methods, but I also, prefer the more hands off approach--with only minimal effort on my part.
I think you could legitimately call that an 'efficient natural process approach' on your part.
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*Now, just because I called myself a "lazy gardener", doesn't mean that I don't keep myself very busy, and sometimes, very busy doing back-breaking work (like moving mini-boulders uphill across an acre or more).
Yes, and I've always enjoyed reading about all the progress you've made on your many projects to restore your landscape for the benefit of all of nature's critters!
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Old 02-10-2015, 07:07 AM   #45
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Your winter sowed seeds are getting the benefits of cold-moist stratification, you're just doing it in a more natural way, closer to the way mother nature would do it.

Doing it in the refrigerator is more gardener like and allows for a more controlled process with potentially more plants. Seeds are not lost to critters, unsuitable temperature or moisture levels, etc. Ordinarily I'm more in favor of the natural process, but I can't help but feel that we humans have a lot of catching up to do with respect to repairing the damage that has been done to our natural ecosystems. Did I mention that I am sometimes impatient ... ?

I think you could legitimately call that an 'efficient natural process approach' on your part.
Yes, and I've always enjoyed reading about all the progress you've made on your many projects to restore your landscape for the benefit of all of nature's critters!
I'm trying the "more natural way" mostly because if I try the "gardener-like way" (in the fridge), I'm sure to forget about them and lose them all

That being said, if my hands-off approach doesn't produce much, I may finally give up and try some seeds in my fridge!

I don't know if I've EVER been so excited for the snow to melt and SPRING to arrive. I can't wait to see if there are any babies in my pots
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:40 PM   #46
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I feel the same way kat. I look forward to seeing how my seeds do
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:06 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by NEWisc View Post
Your winter sowed seeds are getting the benefits of cold-moist stratification, you're just doing it in a more natural way, closer to the way mother nature would do it.

Doing it in the refrigerator is more gardener like and allows for a more controlled process with potentially more plants. Seeds are not lost to critters, unsuitable temperature or moisture levels, etc. Ordinarily I'm more in favor of the natural process, but I can't help but feel that we humans have a lot of catching up to do with respect to repairing the damage that has been done to our natural ecosystems. Did I mention that I am sometimes impatient ... ?

I think you could legitimately call that an 'efficient natural process approach' on your part.
Yes, and I've always enjoyed reading about all the progress you've made on your many projects to restore your landscape for the benefit of all of nature's critters!
NEWISC,

Thank you for the thoughtful, kind response. I'm feeling much better about my 'efficient natural process approach' ! :-)

Also, when I get down on my (perceived?) slowing progress, I'll keep this post in mind. I guess I can be impatient too.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:08 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by katjh View Post
I'm trying the "more natural way" mostly because if I try the "gardener-like way" (in the fridge), I'm sure to forget about them and lose them all

That being said, if my hands-off approach doesn't produce much, I may finally give up and try some seeds in my fridge!

I don't know if I've EVER been so excited for the snow to melt and SPRING to arrive. I can't wait to see if there are any babies in my pots
~smile~ your excitement and enthusiasm shine through in your post.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:10 AM   #49
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Well what you are doing works dap.
Smile.

True. I've really enjoyed my success...and I only hope to have more and more s3ed to collect and sow as those I've grown from seed mature and produce their own. Then, the process of restoration here should speed up.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:12 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by katjh View Post
My notes say I did my first winter sowing on 11-23. I used reclaimed garden center pots (the 2" ones, mostly) and potting soil. I think I posted this list on another thread somewhere, but here it is again: Big-Leaved Aster, Heart-Leaved Aster, Pasque Flower, Pasture Thistle, Poke Milkweed, Purpletop, Rose Milkweed, Slender Gerardia, Tall Bellflower, Whorled Milkweed, Dutchman's Breeches (some direct-sown into woodland garden area, some in pots), Blue Cohosh, Pennsylvania Sedge.

I ended up with 90-some pots total. Hopefully, I will have some success! They are all in a sheltered area, with a piece of window screen over them to keep the squirrels out. They are now covered with snow as well.
Sounds great to me! Let us know when your babies start germinating.
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Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment - Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening This thread Refback 05-06-2015 02:19 AM
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin This thread Refback 11-19-2014 06:59 AM
Ask Mr. Smarty Plants This thread Refback 12-13-2013 10:11 PM


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