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Old 02-07-2015, 01:40 PM   #31
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Bump for related post.
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Old 02-08-2015, 10:36 AM   #32
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Last week, I started sorting throuth some of the seeds I'd collected during summer and fall--I still have tons more to do.


Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment-2015-02-03-08.34.56.jpg

So far, I've only sowed the closed gentian and the Verbena hastata...then covered them with snow. I don't know when I will get to the rest, but I am running out of time. I've winter sowed things as late as February before with success, but th e month will fly by, so I better get the rest out there...and soon!


Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment-20150202_123443.jpg

Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment-20150202_123532.jpg

Thanks for bumping up the thread. What are others doing?
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Old 02-08-2015, 09:11 PM   #33
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I did my first batch on January 22 - those that needed longer amounts of time:
Chelone glabra - I read this needs 120 days, which puts me well into May. So I did one set outside and one set in the fridge to test how long it really takes
Iris versicolor
Monarda fistulosa
Agastache scrophulariifolia
Aquilegia canadensis
Viola lanceolata
Lobelia cardinalis
Lobelia siphilitica
Panicum virgatum - testing one batch on the windowsill to see if it really needs cold moist stratification
Chamerion angustifolium
Symphiotrichum laeve
Symphiotrichum nove-angliae

My next batch just needs to be started before March 1. Those seem to only need 30 days or less of CMS, or none at all:
Asclepias tuberosa
Asclepias incarnata
Helenium autumnale
Rudbeckia hirta
Senna hebecarpa
Elymus virginicus
Schizachyrium scoparium
Sporobolus heterolepis

I'm not great at keeps records of this stuff but I'm really trying since I'm doing so many species and I keep reading different information about the requirements of some species. I'd really like to get my methods down pat so it'll be second nature down the road.
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Old 02-09-2015, 02:43 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Last week, I started sorting throuth some of the seeds I'd collected during summer and fall--I still have tons more to do.


Attachment 42106

So far, I've only sowed the closed gentian and the Verbena hastata...then covered them with snow. I don't know when I will get to the rest, but I am running out of time. I've winter sowed things as late as February before with success, but th e month will fly by, so I better get the rest out there...and soon!


Attachment 42104

Attachment 42105

Thanks for bumping up the thread. What are others doing?
I am reluctant to be the one that might lower your procrastination guilt motivation , but I think you still have a significant amount of time.

There is a common misunderstanding about the timing of winter sowing in northern climates. As long as the seeds that are outside in containers are in a frozen state virtually nothing is happening. There may be a little freeze-thaw action which could help on seeds with waterproof seed coats, but that's about it. No cold-moist stratification is occurring. Cold-moist stratification action doesn't start until the seeds are consistently above freezing temperatures. So seeds put out in December or January or February (in most cases) just sit there in a frozen state; nothing is happening.

If you want to get the benefits of cold-moist stratification (higher germination rates) and you want to figure out a 'last date' for doing this, you could work back from your area's last frost date.

To find your area's last average frost date go to this website:
Plant Maps - Plant, Tree ,Gardening ,Climate and Hardiness Zone Maps
Type in your zip code and click on the 'Zoom to Zip' button. It will take you to a map of your state. Among the menu items you will find on the right side is "Your State Last Frost Date Map". Click on that and you will find the last frost date for your area.

Now if your seed containers are to remain outside you really don't want those seeds to start pushing up leaves before that date anyway. If, for example, the seed you are working with require 30 days of cold-moist stratification and your last frost date was May 10 you could still reasonably put out your winter sown seed containers as late as April 10. Now you won't have perfect cold-moist stratification conditions outside for those 30 days so your seeds will likely germinate a little after the May 10 date, but you probably won't have to deal with frost problems either.

If you cold-moist stratify your seeds in the refrigerator you could time things the same way, but since the refrigerator is almost the ideal temperature 24 hours a day every day, your seeds would be ready to germinate May 10 if you started them on April 10.
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Old 02-09-2015, 07:18 AM   #35
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I did my first batch of wintersowing, ever, thanks to kchd and wildwatcher. They are starting to come up. My only concern now is how long to wait to transplant out those little seedlings that came up a hundred per square inch. . .
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Old 02-09-2015, 09:30 AM   #36
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I did my winter sowing. Mine all have lids on them. I put holes in the top and bottom of the containers. I'm worried that there might be too much moisture in the containers. There is a lot of condensation on the lids. I have never done this before. Today it is raining but I will check on them on a day when it is not raining. I might have to leave the lids off so they can dry out a little. I don't want them to rot.
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Old 02-09-2015, 01:01 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
I did my first batch on January 22 - those that needed longer amounts of time:
Chelone glabra - I read this needs 120 days, which puts me well into May. So I did one set outside and one set in the fridge to test how long it really takes...

My next batch just needs to be started before March 1. Those seem to only need 30 days or less of CMS, or none at all...
Nice list of species you have there, disuhan.

I tell you, you've already done more research than I on the amount of time it required by each species. Although, I have to admit, I did research about the closed gentian (Gentiana andrewsii)--since that is not common for me, and I was lucky enough to find a small patch near our friends' house. I'd really like to see these succeed. (I have little doubt that the other seeds I've collected will grow...they have in the past.)

The gentian is supposed to require a bit longer time period than I have given it, so we'll see--I can start a second batch and keep them in the fridge longer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
I'm not great at keeps records of this stuff but I'm really trying since I'm doing so many species and I keep reading different information about the requirements of some species. I'd really like to get my methods down pat so it'll be second nature down the road.
I hear you on the record-keeping. I'm sure it will pay off for you--and for all of us, too, if you share your findings here.
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Old 02-09-2015, 01:09 PM   #38
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I am reluctant to be the one that might lower your procrastination guilt motivation , but I think you still have a significant amount of time.

There is a common misunderstanding about the timing of winter sowing...

Don't be reluctant at all, NEWisc! I'll take any extra time I can get!

And, thank you for the additional information.

I guess, over the past few years, I've just sowed the seeds, covered them with snow and let the spring's freezing and thawing do the rest--maybe I don't understand the method as much as I thought. I can't imagine, in nature, the seeds getting the ideal temperatures for that long of a time (but, perhaps with cold stratification, we are not mimicking nature, but trying to provide the highest germination rate).

Being more of a lazy gardener*, not only did I not really research stratification methods, but I also, prefer the more hands off approach--with only minimal effort on my part.

*Now, just because I called myself a "lazy gardener", doesn't mean that I don't keep myself very busy, and sometimes, very busy doing back-breaking work (like moving mini-boulders uphill across an acre or more).
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Old 02-09-2015, 01:12 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biigblueyes View Post
I did my first batch of wintersowing, ever, thanks to kchd and wildwatcher. They are starting to come up. My only concern now is how long to wait to transplant out those little seedlings that came up a hundred per square inch. . .
Congratulations, biigblueyes!

I have the same problem--normally, I have great plans to separate all of those tiny seedlings, either putting them in larger individual pots or, more likely, putting them out in the ground. The problem I encounter is that, when they are coming up, I have tons of other things to do around the property that time of year. I've been known to let them grow (in that crowded condition) all the way into the fall before planting them out!

This year, I'm hoping to be able to direct sow.
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Old 02-09-2015, 01:15 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by EllenW View Post
I did my winter sowing. Mine all have lids on them. I put holes in the top and bottom of the containers. I'm worried that there might be too much moisture in the containers. There is a lot of condensation on the lids. I have never done this before. Today it is raining but I will check on them on a day when it is not raining. I might have to leave the lids off so they can dry out a little. I don't want them to rot.

Ellen,

I never use lids--I sometimes cover them with screens.

I have holes on the bottom (or, often near the bottom--I drill six small holes three on each side, about a 1/4 inch from the bottom to allow for drainage, but still keep them from drying out too fast).
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Cold Moist Stratification - an Important Seed Treatment - Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening This thread Refback 05-06-2015 02:19 AM
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin This thread Refback 11-19-2014 06:59 AM
Ask Mr. Smarty Plants This thread Refback 12-13-2013 10:11 PM


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