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Old 01-09-2011, 06:51 PM   #21
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Yes, bumping is a way to bring a topic back to the top of the threads. I thought this was a good one since people were discussing winter seed sowing.
Hey, I actually figured that out!

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I like how you were able to color-code the different species of seeds that you had mixed together. How did you do that??
I used Photoshop for that. I think I copied the picture and pasted it as a layer, then I turned that new layer to black and white. Lastly, I used the history brush around the seedlings that I wanted to show up as green.

I have no idea where the original pictures are stored on my computer, but luckily I can find it on the blog, save it, and post it here. That is the closest thing I have to a journal and it is all in one place. I'm so glad I started it, I just hope I keep up with it. I really want to be able to show "before and after" shots--it will be a long time before I have any "after" shots, but at least this next spring and summer I'll take more "during" pictures.

Here's hoping that I have the same success with the seeds I collected this year. Many are the same, but I also have some meadow rue seeds that I collected from the side of a road.

Does anyone know what needs to be done for meadow rue seeds to germinate?
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Old 11-17-2011, 07:51 AM   #22
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Wait, so I don't need to go spend a $1000 on plants?! This winter sowing business really works?

I am so happy I found this info, and in time to winter sow this year! I'm feeling pretty impatient about waiting for seeds to grow into fully blooming, wildlife-attracting plants, but I could really use that Grand on more important stuff.

My biggest fear is that since I know hardly anything about gardening, I won't be successful, but after reading through these suggestions/methods, I'm feeling more confident that I can do it.

This all started when I happened across the prairie moon website looking at pictures of natives I wanted. I ordered a catalog immediately, and I'm glad to hear such positive feedback about them.

Thanks everyone! (I find myself saying that a lot around here - such wonderful people and information!)
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:10 AM   #23
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Wait, so I don't need to go spend a $1000 on plants?! This winter sowing business really works?
(giggle) No you do not. Winter sowing truly does work. However, please understand there will be no instant gratification as there would be with the purchase of mature plants.

You have a considerable amount of time to your advantage. If my understanding is correct, you do not intend to move for five years perhaps seven. This would afford more than ample time for the maturation of any seedlings.

Have you discovered our native plant nursery listing threads-
North American Native Plant Nurseries- United States M-Z
Catalogs from nurseries located in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware will offer seed more compatible with your region.
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:30 AM   #24
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I would love to stay put for 5-7 years yes, that's the current plan. But due to my field of work, I could end up moving in a year or less. I've never stayed anywhere more than 14 months since I graduated college. I'm trying to stop that trend though.

How many years do most plants take to bloom? Is this too general a question for "most plants"? I could handle just growth this year (2012), if they bloom next year (2013), but I don't have much more patience than that.

What I think I will end up doing is purchasing a few mature plants that I don't need as much of, like the buttonbush I want, and the aquatic plants I need/want because a) I'm thinking wintersowing aquatics is different and/or harder than others and b) when I build my pond in spring I will need plants in it immediately.

Thanks for the suggestion about closer nurseries selling seeds also - there are a few species I'm looking for that are more Northeast/Atlantic coast that Prairie Moon shouldn't be expected to (and doesn't) have.
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Old 11-17-2011, 12:14 PM   #25
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You are most welcome.

While using seed from local ecotypes is always preferable, it is not always possible (sigh). It is for this reason our native plant nurseries threads were created.

Perhaps this may help explain why the purchase of plants and seed from nurseries within our own regions has become increasingly more important-
Local Ecotype Guidelines
Hence, the use of seed from nurseries as far away as MN, TX or even OH would not be in the best interests of the fauna that will be visiting your gardens.

Might I suggest a book to you?
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Old 11-17-2011, 09:58 PM   #26
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I'm all ears on the book suggestion. I have a lot to learn.
I have read Tallamy's Bringing Nature Home, but not much else about native plants yet.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:20 PM   #27
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- such wonderful people and information!
~smile~ We told you so!

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Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
Have you discovered our native plant nursery listing threads-
http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/north-american-native-plants/180-north-american-native-plant-nurseries-united-states-m-z.html
Catalogs from nurseries located in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware will offer seed more compatible with your region.
Thanks for the link TheLorax. I forgot about that one!

(Nice to see you posting again. )


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How many years do most plants take to bloom? Is this too general a question for "most plants"? I could handle just growth this year (2012), if they bloom next year (2013), but I don't have much more patience than that.
Most (or maybe I should say many) perennials will bloom their second year, but I was surprised to see a couple of mine bloom the first year (not profusely, but a couple did). Annuals will bloom the first year, go to seed, die out, and grow again from seed to repeat the process the next year. I can't think of too many native annuals, but I'm sure they are out there. Two that come to mind are touch-me-not/jewelweed (Impatiens) and daisy fleabane (Erigeron). Other wildflowers, such as Trillium are supposed to require as many as seven years from seed to bloom.

I've grown a lot of asters, butterfly weed, and Penstemon digitalis from seed...among others.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:37 PM   #28
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Seeds are probably the best bet from a pocket book standpoint. Next best on the pocket book would be plugs and bare roots. They’re intimidating at 1st but they’re much more affordable than purchasing plants in pots… it’s just getting over the hump of buying em and trying em is all. I totally agree with Lorax that sticking to local ecotypes would be best but…. like she said… not easy unless we’re members of local native plant groups that have seed swaps. Mid-Atlantic sources would work for sure for a Long Island gardener. Maybe try rooting around at some of these nurseries for what you want, http://agmap.psu.edu/Businesses/5593, Enchanter's Garden, https://www.midatlanticnatives.com/mid_atlantic_natives_home.html, Our Native Plants | Blue Water Baltimore, New Moon Nursery - "From the Water... to the Woods", Thistlebrook Natives, Toadshade Wildflower Farm, Edge Of The Woods Nursery, and this 1 that’s a little bit too far south but… might work, Coastal Plain Native Plants - Growing Wild Nursery. Maybe give these folk a call, Environmental Concern - dedicated to working with all aspects of wetlands; the most active and fascinating ecosystems in the world. and Southern Tier Consulting ? They "might" have some local ecotype seed available.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:52 PM   #29
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Thanks you guys. I will try some wintersowing (with progress reports) this year and see what happens. If I bust, I'm only out a few bucks. And I'd still have time to buy plants come spring anyway.
I did just find a nursery in CT that sells plugs, so I'm definitely going to shop there, and they don't take credit cards, so that will keep me in line with getting only what I need.

It's a good thing I like planning stuff or I'd be even more antsy to get started than I already am! I can't wait for spring!!!
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Old 11-18-2011, 12:39 AM   #30
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So patience isn't exactly 1 of your virtues, eh? It's not 1 of mine either.
--
"If I bust" You won't!!! Even your 1st year out you'll have more successes than failures. Just don't let your medium dry out.
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Lizards Tail is a favorite pond plant of mine. It's elegant and pleasing on the eye yet.... fun to play with. Look that 1 up.... it's probably native to where you garden and I think it'll tickle your fancy.... if nothing else... you can tickle your boyfriend's bare feet with it when he falls asleep outside in a hammock. The scientific name is Saururus cernuus. It's a larval host to quite a few butterflies supposedly... none of which I know the names of but I know for sure it supports quite a few moths. I've got little solar lights by a pond that has that plant in it and I've seen moths nectaring from it. The moths look like little fairies in the soft glow of the solar lights.
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