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Old 04-19-2010, 04:12 PM   #31
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I would like to learn more about the seedling picture contest please.
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Old 04-19-2010, 07:43 PM   #32
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I'm still setting it up, but there will be several categories, for native plants, invasive plants, and food plants. There will be a prize for best picture and some runner-up awards.
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Old 04-20-2010, 12:40 AM   #33
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Rubbing hands together with glee and getting all psyched to see photos!!! You rock swamp thing!!!
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:03 PM   #34
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My favorite are the large costco chicken boxes and lettuce boxes and the to go boxes with a large lid. Starbucks clear with a dome works well also. I have a lot of the same sizes so stack them and drill through at the same time for the holes.

It's almost time to start winter solstice is Dec 21.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:26 AM   #35
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Last winter was my first attempt at winter sowing and it went really well. I used 3.5 inch pots but instead of covering them with plastic, I placed them into a clear under-bed bin with a clear lid that snaps on. I didn't worry about them again until it was time to start checking on them. One bin held 50 pots. As long as the height of the item is less than the bin, you could use any item you want. It worked very well for me, so I'm doing it again this year.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:34 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Native View Post
Last winter was my first attempt at winter sowing and it went really well. I used 3.5 inch pots but instead of covering them with plastic, I placed them into a clear under-bed bin with a clear lid that snaps on. I didn't worry about them again until it was time to start checking on them. One bin held 50 pots. As long as the height of the item is less than the bin, you could use any item you want. It worked very well for me, so I'm doing it again this year.

That sounds like a *great* tip, Missouri Native. Thanks for sharing it.

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When I joined about a year ago, I just jumped in and started posting like you (which is fine, by the way )...it took me a while to introduce myself. Everyone here is so friendly and willing to share their experiences and knowledge. You'll fit in great!
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Old 01-09-2011, 07:16 PM   #37
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umm. OK, so... does no one just plant directly into the soil?

I bought a load of seed from Prairie Moon there. And, basically I broadcast it about my garden before the big snows came.
Actually, not quite true, I planted it in patches, I lifted a patch of the oak leaves I gathered up from the local woods, and then sprinkled the seed on the earth, and then dropped the leaves back on. Immediately after this about 2+ feet of snow fell, so I think they should get nice and pressed down.

I haven't seen ground since then, more snow fell on Friday, and there is more coming this week.

I'm just worried that this might not work out? I was supposing that this is what happens in the wild, so it should continue to work.

I bought a good load of seed, since it becomes relatively cheaper as you increase the amounts. I justified it by saying X costs less than a drink after work in NYC, so I'll just skip the drink.

I actually bought purposely too much seed, and I broadcast this on all the untended gardens I look out on. I know most of the people, so I will break the news to them in the fullness of time.

Now I am wondering how these will do, with all this care and attention you guys are lavishing on your seedlings...
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Old 01-09-2011, 07:36 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philip View Post
umm. OK, so... does no one just plant directly into the soil?


I'm sure someone (or many someones) will give you a more complete answer, but here are my thoughts:

I'm thinking that it could, and probably should work...at least for some things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by philip View Post
I bought a load of seed...basically I broadcast it about my garden before the big snows came...I planted it in patches, I lifted a patch of the oak leaves I gathered up from the local woods, and then sprinkled the seed on the earth, and then dropped the leaves back on. Immediately after this about 2+ feet of snow fell, so I think they should get nice and pressed down.

...I'm just worried that this might not work out? I was supposing that this is what happens in the wild, so it should continue to work.
Now I am wondering how these will do, with all this care and attention you guys are lavishing on your seedlings...


My main concern is competition. Will the seeds be competing with full grown plants? Is there bare soil under the leaves? Will the leaves smother the seeds? Will critters eat the seeds?

I guess what I'm saying is that you may get some (or hopefully a lot) of seedlings, but as in nature, just a small percentage of the seeds will germinate and of these how many will make it.


By planting them where you can watch and tend to them as the sprout, then you can move them to their desired location (some people may grow them in a starter bed for a year or so, I planted mine out where I wanted them to grow--normally right after a rain or when rain was expected. I did water them at times, but mostly they were on their own.

...I didn't think I lavished much care on mine...I even found them wilting one day and had to move them to the shade and water them. That was about it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by philip View Post

I bought a good load of seed, since it becomes relatively cheaper as you increase the amounts. I justified it by saying X costs less than a drink after work in NYC, so I'll just skip the drink.


You sound like me...that is how I think, but normally I think I'd be willing to skip a dinner out (not that we do that too often any more)...and spend the money on plants. I'm not very into cappuccinos and the like.
Quote:
Originally Posted by philip View Post
I actually bought purposely too much seed, and I broadcast this on all the untended gardens I look out on. I know most of the people, so I will break the news to them in the fullness of time.


Sounds like you may be interested in this thread:
Guerilla Gardening
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Old 01-09-2011, 08:46 PM   #39
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I'm in your camp, phillip. But... a scattering of leaves will allow seeds to germinate and find daylight in which to grow. A layer of leaves is likely to block access to light and result in smothered sprouts or simply no germination due to no light. Wet, snow-compressed leaves can be a pretty dense cover.

I've spread seeds casually in the yard where the grass (I don't mow) is thin, and a few of the savannah-mix plants are showing up year-by-year. The first year or two I didn't think I was getting any results.

I'm just not a winter-sowing person, but I'm trying again this year because I need some seedlings for a volunteer gardening project.
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Old 01-10-2011, 08:30 AM   #40
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I get you.

I suppose the proof of the pudding is in the eating. It's too late now, I've planted all my seed.

I put a sprinkling of leaves down, since that's all that was left. My leaf mulch seems to be breaking down at a ferocious rate.

It's actually not totally guerrilla gardening Two of the people are just not able to garden.
And the third I am cross with, since he drove his car into my motorbike and knocked it over.. hahaha.
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