Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > General Gardening Boards > North American Native Plants > North American Native Plant Propagation and Winter Sowing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-11-2009, 10:04 PM   #11
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

Booboobearbecky: I sure like your tool lay out. What is the black and decker cutter?
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2009, 03:05 AM   #12
WG Operations, Facilitator
 
BooBooBearBecky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northern Wisconsin
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgerowe View Post
Really good instructions and photos, BooBooBearBecky. Thanks very much! Do you have any photos of the pots with their plastic hoods on?
I don't have any photos of my recycled dirt & seed filled containers wrapped up in the platstic. I was taking photos this past winter when I was doing my winter sowing, but once I started playing in the dirt I forgot about the camera. I'll make up a sample of how to do this and post here in a few days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelnut View Post
Booboobearbecky: I sure like your tool lay out. What is the black and decker cutter?
The black & deck thing-a-ma-jig is an electric rechargable scissors. I purchased them to get all that clam shell packaging open that everything nowadays is sold in. Then I discovered they work really well for cutting up reclyed plastic containers used for winter sowing. So much safer than using a knife or a pair of regular scissors....buzz buzz buzz and you're done. No hand cramps and no blood.

BooBooBearBecky
__________________
"Getting your hands dirty is the best way to keep your head clean."
BooBooBearBecky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2009, 08:27 AM   #13
WG Writer
 
hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default

"No cramps no blood". That would be a pleasant relief!

I have a little cutter on my dremel for making drain holes. I used to heat an awl on the gas burner and then melt through the plastic to make the holes. Not a good idea - the fumes from the plastic are very noxious and toxic.

The older I get the more I realize toxic exposure like this affects your immune system. At some point you don't bounce back as well as you should. So its a good idea to take care of your self and think about what you are doing if you expect to still keep going through your 70s and 80s. You have to live with your own history.
hazelnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2009, 09:49 PM   #14
WG Operations, Facilitator
 
BooBooBearBecky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northern Wisconsin
Default

Hazelnut,
Thanks for the tip on using a dremel with a cutter attachment to make drain holes.

I used to use an electric drill, but my hand just gets too tired, so I opted for the soldiering iron. I'll have a dremel, so I'll see if I can find a cutting/hole making attachment for it.

Thanks for the tip!
BooBooBearBecky
__________________
"Getting your hands dirty is the best way to keep your head clean."
BooBooBearBecky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2010, 01:36 PM   #15
Carbon
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: eastern Washington
Default

great info all! one of my favorite subjects here, winter sowing, as of last year. last year was the first time i tried this and had great success. i found this website:

WinterSown.Org ~ The Authoritative Site for Winter Sowing Information.

through another forum and it was really helpful. a lot of info has been added since last year, and lots of pics too! i am doing a lot this year and if i ever find my camera, i'll post some pics. i don't have any from last year. love your pics booboobear!

i winter sowed mostly flowers and herbs last year. this year i'm doing some veggies, like cabbage and toms and such as well.

i use Sunshine potting mix, same as i use for transplants, soilblockers and all. it works great and no weeds. i'm hoping to eventually start making my own mix sometime soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by biigblueyes View Post
Last year I used bottles/jugs, cut them almost all the way through, leaving a "hinge" so I could flip the top part of the bottle back, add soil and seeds, then flipped it back in place. I had to water them occasionally. Should I have taped around the cut to seal it?

Do you have to water yours occasionally?
i use a lot of bottles and jugs too, and i have tried a couple techniques, one like yours biigblueyes. when i do the hinge type i have had to put a small piece of tape on the opposite side of the hinge to keep it closed. not to seal it, but to make a snug fit. i also have cut the bottles totally in half and cut a couple slits on opposite sides to slip the top and bottom together. i gather one wants to make a snug fit, not a seal so the air can circulate.

i also put holes in the top as well as the bottom. if the soil gets too wet, i put more holes in the top and sometimes the sides. to make holes i use an ice pick.
bunkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2010, 08:31 PM   #16
Pope
 
Hedgerowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia
Default

I would love to see photos of the techniques you have used with your bottles and jugs, bunkie.
Hedgerowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2010, 12:59 AM   #17
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

Quote:
i also have cut the bottles totally in half and cut a couple slits on opposite sides to slip the top and bottom together.
This is a very nice idea.
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2010, 01:42 PM   #18
Carbon
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: eastern Washington
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgerowe View Post
I would love to see photos of the techniques you have used with your bottles and jugs, bunkie.
here's apics of our dog lizzie guarding some of our winter sown pots!

http://i48.tinypic.com/34iocb6.jpg
bunkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2010, 02:29 PM   #19
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bunkie View Post

i use a lot of bottles and jugs too, and i have tried a couple techniques, one like yours biigblueyes. when i do the hinge type i have had to put a small piece of tape on the opposite side of the hinge to keep it closed. not to seal it, but to make a snug fit. i also have cut the bottles totally in half and cut a couple slits on opposite sides to slip the top and bottom together. i gather one wants to make a snug fit, not a seal so the air can circulate.

i also put holes in the top as well as the bottom. if the soil gets too wet, i put more holes in the top and sometimes the sides. to make holes i use an ice pick.
Great idea. I've started doing that now too. The problem is that I can't pop tops because squirrels will dig in them, and I can't tape them shut even a little bit or algal growth starts when the weather gets a bit warm. So I'm hoping that cutting holes and slits in the top will allow enough air circulation in a taped-shut container to prevent the algal growth.
amelanchier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2010, 02:14 PM   #20
Carbon
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: eastern Washington
Default

catching up here...

amelanchier, those holes in the tops and the bottoms are very important. that's a good idea!

here's a pics of some of our winter sown seedlings from this year. they are germinating like crazy! i'm putting them in our greenhouse till it's time to plant them in the gardens.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2s6n97p.jpg
bunkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
containers for winter sowing, germination, how to winter sow, native plant germination, recycled containers, recycled plastic, sowing, techniques, tips, tips for winter sowing, winter, winter sow, winter sow containers, winter sow native plants, winter sowing, winter sowing techniques

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2