Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > General Gardening Boards > North American Native Plants > North American Native Plant Propagation and Winter Sowing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-04-2019, 10:29 PM   #41
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by katjh View Post
My flats are all buried under so much snow that I'm not even sure exactly where they are! I haven't stepped on them yet, so that's a good thing.

I had some plants left at the end of the season last year, too. Not many, and nothing terribly exciting. I tried tucking them all close together and covering them with leaves. We shall see if that worked.
Here's hoping we both find that ours survived the winter--AND we get them.planted early this year!
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2019, 10:30 PM   #42
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
You can sow your seeds in cardboard egg cartons. No transplant shock later on...just plant pod and all when the time comes
I might have to give that a try.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2019, 04:35 PM   #43
Hippie Gardener
 
katjh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Michigan
Default

Another arctic blast this week! After this, the long-term forecast looks like temps trending UP at last.
I hope to get out and take some cuttings from elderberry and ninebark yet this winter, but I'm out of potting soil to plant them in. I'll have to scrounge around at work and look for some broken bags, once the snow melts. I think I'll do some pussy willow cutting this year as well.
Speaking of pussy willow...when I went out to fill bird feeders on Sunday, I noticed that some of the buds on my pussy willow are already starting to break. I was a bit surprised by that since it's been so cold. I'm sure they'll bust out just as soon as we get some warmer temps and some sunshine. Another sure sign that spring isn't far off now.
__________________
One with the earth, with the sky, one with everything in life. I believe it will start with conviction of the heart.
~Kenny Loggins~
katjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2019, 06:31 AM   #44
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: NJ
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by katjh View Post
Another arctic blast this week! After this, the long-term forecast looks like temps trending UP at last.
I hope to get out and take some cuttings from elderberry and ninebark yet this winter, but I'm out of potting soil to plant them in. I'll have to scrounge around at work and look for some broken bags, once the snow melts. I think I'll do some pussy willow cutting this year as well.
Speaking of pussy willow...when I went out to fill bird feeders on Sunday, I noticed that some of the buds on my pussy willow are already starting to break. I was a bit surprised by that since it's been so cold. I'm sure they'll bust out just as soon as we get some warmer temps and some sunshine. Another sure sign that spring isn't far off now.
Do you think pussywillow would grow well in a low spot in a yard or field? Will it tolerate standing water in the spring and winter or should it be at the edge of the water, and will it survive if the soil dries out in summer? I dont think the soil is compacted, water just infiltrates slowly and the water table rises over the winter.
skip1909 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2019, 09:46 PM   #45
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by katjh View Post
Another arctic blast this week! After this, the long-term forecast looks like temps trending UP at last.
I hope to get out and take some cuttings from elderberry and ninebark yet this winter, but I'm out of potting soil to plant them in. I'll have to scrounge around at work and look for some broken bags, once the snow melts. I think I'll do some pussy willow cutting this year as well.
Speaking of pussy willow...when I went out to fill bird feeders on Sunday, I noticed that some of the buds on my pussy willow are already starting to break. I was a bit surprised by that since it's been so cold. I'm sure they'll bust out just as soon as we get some warmer temps and some sunshine. Another sure sign that spring isn't far off now.
I have been wanting to root more elderberry, too. I was planning on sticking them straight into the ground very early in the spring. Maybe I should try half that way and half in potting mix.

We have frigid temperatures this week, too. And my pussy willow has been starting to just open for about two weeks now.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2019, 10:01 PM   #46
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skip1909 View Post
Do you think pussywillow would grow well in a low spot in a yard or field? Will it tolerate standing water in the spring and winter or should it be at the edge of the water, and will it survive if the soil dries out in summer? I dont think the soil is compacted, water just infiltrates slowly and the water table rises over the winter.
I am no expert, but I would think that it could handle standing water. We have one that was here before we moved here, growing in moist well-drained soil (pretty much average soil)--no standing water, but it would naturally grow near water or in a boggy situation, I believe.

I would be a little bit concerned about it drying out over the summer. (I am picturing a dried up mud hole. If it just no longer has standing water and is just average soil, I would expect it would be fine.)
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 02:09 PM   #47
Hippie Gardener
 
katjh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Michigan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skip1909 View Post
Do you think pussywillow would grow well in a low spot in a yard or field? Will it tolerate standing water in the spring and winter or should it be at the edge of the water, and will it survive if the soil dries out in summer? I dont think the soil is compacted, water just infiltrates slowly and the water table rises over the winter.
I think the pussy willow would do fine in that situation as long as "dries out in summer" means average garden soil. I don't see the standing water being an issue. They seem to grow well in our local nature preserve where they are in standing water for a good part of the early spring.
Mine are both in my back yard. Average garden soil. I did water them occasionally for the first season or two if we had a prolonged dry spell. Since then, I have not supplemented watering at all and we've had a couple of hot, dry summers.
__________________
One with the earth, with the sky, one with everything in life. I believe it will start with conviction of the heart.
~Kenny Loggins~
katjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 02:11 PM   #48
Hippie Gardener
 
katjh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Michigan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I have been wanting to root more elderberry, too. I was planning on sticking them straight into the ground very early in the spring. Maybe I should try half that way and half in potting mix.

We have frigid temperatures this week, too. And my pussy willow has been starting to just open for about two weeks now.
I've done some elderberry cuttings straight into the ground as well. My problem is that I forget to water when I do it that way. Putting them in pots for the first few months helps me keep an eye on them.
__________________
One with the earth, with the sky, one with everything in life. I believe it will start with conviction of the heart.
~Kenny Loggins~
katjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 02:14 PM   #49
Hippie Gardener
 
katjh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Michigan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I am no expert, but I would think that it could handle standing water. We have one that was here before we moved here, growing in moist well-drained soil (pretty much average soil)--no standing water, but it would naturally grow near water or in a boggy situation, I believe.

I would be a little bit concerned about it drying out over the summer. (I am picturing a dried up mud hole. If it just no longer has standing water and is just average soil, I would expect it would be fine.)
I agree....I'm no expert either, but, as I said in my above post, mine are both doing fine in average soil. They seem to be pretty tolerant once they are established. One of mine was aggressively pruned by rabbits for about 3 years. I thought it was dead. In the spring of 2017, it just sprung up out of nowhere and is now a good sized shrub.
__________________
One with the earth, with the sky, one with everything in life. I believe it will start with conviction of the heart.
~Kenny Loggins~
katjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2019, 08:20 AM   #50
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: NJ
Default

Thanks for the info about the pussy willow. I think I will pick one up this spring from bowman hill if they have them. Yes when it dries out it blends back in with the rest of the lawn (which is mostly weeds and violets). I've been looking to add some kind of smaller willow for caterpillars and this seems like an adaptable one. Salix humilis is my next choice but that one is less common in trade around here.
skip1909 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
2018, sowing, winter

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2