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Old 02-05-2019, 05:09 PM   #21
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Honestly the figwort wasn't on my radar at all, but it was given to me in a seed trade. It looks like a weed but I figured it wouldn't look too out of place in a wild part-shade area, and if it support pollinators, why not?
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:47 PM   #22
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The wood betony is in our yard, but then most of our yard is kind of a wild prairie like area. They are in several locations throughout that area. The host plants that they are using are the native grasses, primarily little bluestem.

The first plants were transplants, and I was careful to keep thier host plants in good condition while doing the transplant. Since then a few additional wood betony plants have appeared; they self sowed from the seeds of the original plants.
Good to know that little bluestem is a host to them. Maybe someday I will get it to grow here.

Also, I love your tagline.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:51 PM   #23
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It's been a similar kind of experience for me. I think that it may be a natural evolution for people interested in the environment and native plants to move gradually from form to function when considering the value of a plant.

If a plant is good for pollinators it has my interest. If it's a natural supporting participant in an ecosystem I'm interested. Beauty is not irrelevant, but it has a much greater depth and broader scope than just the color of its flowers or the structure of its foliage.
I agree.

For many years, I have been interested in a variety of plants that are not very showy...or have small flowers not noticed at even a short distance. However, unless I encountered them, or found them on a field guide, I would not know them. The figworts were just not one I had ever remembered encountering.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:58 PM   #24
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Honestly the figwort wasn't on my radar at all, but it was given to me in a seed trade. It looks like a weed but I figured it wouldn't look too out of place in a wild part-shade area, and if it support pollinators, why not?


Mine would look much better out in the more wild areas of our property, however, when I was given 5 plugs or so, I planted them in the only area that had soil already prepared--right near the house at that time. I figured it would allow me to keep an eye on it and learn to recognize it. Definitely, not the best spot for it.

I did collect seed the first time it bloomed...so hopefully I will get more...but the second or third year, they grew out of dormancy, then when about 10 inches high, they were attacked by an insect or something, turned brown and died.

This fall I noticed two more not too far from there. Glad I could recognize them without seeing them bloom. Here's hoping they return, and that I can transplant them to a more appropriate setting.
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Old 02-18-2019, 12:11 PM   #25
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Default ...make that 2019

I am getting a late start...and I seem to be dragging my feet, but I am getting closer to actually sowing my seeds:
Winter Sowing 2018-20190217_121808.jpg

Winter Sowing 2018-20190217_170232.jpg

Winter Sowing 2018-20190217_132416.jpg

Winter Sowing 2018-20190217_194857.jpg
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Old 02-18-2019, 02:10 PM   #26
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Looks like about what I was doing last week but instead.... made potpourri out of my excess seeds and heads
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Old 02-19-2019, 07:41 PM   #27
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I am getting a late start...and I seem to be dragging my feet, but I am getting closer to actually sowing my seeds:
Attachment 46263

Attachment 46264

Attachment 46265

Attachment 46266
Progress! I tried using the plug trays one year. I lost almost everything it the spring, when I got busy at work and didn't keep up with watering. They just dried out too fast. The 1020 flats don't dry out as fast here.

My flats are now happily "chilling" under a nice blanket of snow. I'm eagerly awaiting spring so I can see what survived the early cold/dry weeks of winter.
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Old 02-19-2019, 07:42 PM   #28
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Looks like about what I was doing last week but instead.... made potpourri out of my excess seeds and heads
I never thought of making potpourri. Great idea! I always just dump all my extra seeds out into the garden areas. I don't like to save them from year to year. I'd just end up with a huge stash that would never get used up.
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Old 02-20-2019, 12:42 PM   #29
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I've done that too.
Flung the excess to the hillside hoping they'd settle in and sprout on their own.
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Old 02-20-2019, 06:12 PM   #30
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Progress! I tried using the plug trays one year. I lost almost everything it the spring, when I got busy at work and didn't keep up with watering. They just dried out too fast. The 1020 flats don't dry out as fast here.

My flats are now happily "chilling" under a nice blanket of snow. I'm eagerly awaiting spring so I can see what survived the early cold/dry weeks of winter.
I could see that happening to me...but, I think I kept them near the house with some shade--and I would cover them with a screen on very hit days to block some of the sun and hopefully hold in a bit more moisture--I recall.doing that one time where we were going to be out of town for 5 days. They survived.

I also have grown them in kiddie pools filled with water--with drainage holes drilled into the sides about half an inch form the bottom. I got that idea from here from Equilibrium, I think.

I did the same with the clear containers (pot saucers) I used this year...but on a smaller scale--drilling holes in the sides very close to the bottom. That way it holds a thin layer of water on the bottom, while still allowing it to drain and not get waterlogged during rains.
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